Select Page

Collection: Indian Home Guard

Bounty Declaration of Sarah Chickasaw and Sarah Daugherty

United States Agency For Cherokees, Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, July 25, 1870. SIR: I have the honor to state that a check, numbered 25467, in favor of Sarah Chickasaw, widow of Throw Chickasaw, Company K, Third Indian Home Guards, was obtained from me by a Cherokee woman named Sarah Dougherty under the following circumstances, and to ask how the amount is to be made good to the proper claimant: Sarah Dougherty, who does not speak or understand English, applied to me through the interpreter, Mr. Benge, for bounty money due Sarah Chickasaw. No discharge accompanied the check in question, but as the letter of transmittal gave the husband’s name, I told Mr. Benge to ask it of her. He informed me she gave the name correctly, and stated he had known her during the war by the name of Sarah Chickasaw, and was satisfied she was the person the check was intended for; but I learned afterwards he did not tell me what the former interpreter, Mr. Sanders, said to him in Cherokee about his suspicion that she was not the proper person. After consideration the check was paid, indorsed in my presence, and cashed with money I had borrowed from traders for the purpose and transferred into circulation. Some days afterwards the proper claimant appeared and established her identity beyond doubt, stating that she had heard that Sarah...

Read More

Bounty Declaration of TILDA

Creek Agency, Creek Nation, March I1, 1870. Personally appeared before me, F. A. Field, Captain, United States Army, Indian agent Creek Nation, the undersigned, a Creek woman, and a widow of AR-HAR-LOC-YARHOLA, late of Company E, First Regiment Indian Home Guards, who testifies that she has received but $85 on account of the services of her deceased husband, although she is entitled to the sum of $200 bounty, and about $100 for pay due as a sergeant up to the time of her husband’s death, and that she has made repeated applications for the payment of her just dues, but has never been able to obtain it. The affidavit now prays that the Government may send the money due her. Her XX mark TILDA Sworn to and subscribed before me this 11th day of March, A. D. 1870. F. A. FIELD, Captain, United States Army, Indian...

Read More

Bounty Declaration of Sarah Jefferys

Creek Agency, December 30, 1869. SIR: I have the honor to report that Sarah Jefferys, widow of George Jefferys, Company G, Eighty-third Regiment, United States Colored Troops, and applied for her bounty, or the bounty her husband was entitled to for his services. She states that J. W. Wright took the discharge of her husband, with the promise to procure the bounty for her, and that she has never received or heard anything from it. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, F. A. FIELD, Captain, United States Army, Agent. Colonel E. S. PARKER, Commissioner of Indian. Affairs, Washington, D....

Read More

Seminole Revoke Power of Attorney

We-Wo-Ka, Seminole Nation, ss: Be it remembered that on this 14th day of September, A. D. 1567, before me, E. J. Brown, Acting United States agent for the Seminole Indians, personally came the persons mentioned below, who, being first by me duly sworn, and having the oath duly interpreted to them by Robert Johnson, United States interpreter, depose as follows: We are members of the First Regiment Indian Home Guards, in the company and under the captain designated opposite our names, and were honorably discharged. Some time in the month of ___, A. D. 186-, we delivered to J. W. Weight our certificates of discharge, made and subscribed the necessary declaration for the purpose of obtaining bounty or back pay, to which we were entitled under the provisions of the act of Congress approved the – day of , A. D. 186, We also executed and delivered to the said J. W. Wright, a “power of attorney” to act as our attorney in fact, and draw the bounty or back pay for us. We further state that up to the present time we have not received the same or any portion thereof from the said J. W. ‘Wright, or from any person for him or from any source whatever. We make this declaration for the purpose of having the same paid to us as soon as possible through the...

Read More

Bounty Pay letter for Tef-fah

Creek Agency, September 1, 1869. Sin: I have the honor to enclose herewith discharge and other papers of a Creek subject named Tef-fah. He says that the account of his retained pay is correct, but he further states that he is entitled to bounty, and as he has not received it, he would like to know whether it cannot be added to the enclosed account. As I know nothing about it, I respectfully refer the matter to you. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, F. A. FIELD, Captain, United States Army, Agent. Colonel E. S. PARKER, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Washington, D....

Read More

Bounty Declaration of Nancy Kesterson

Shelbyville, Missouri, Jane 21, 1869. SIR: I wrote you some time ago concerning the claim of Nancy Kesterson, as mother of George M. Kesterson, but have received no answer. At the request of claimant I now write, again. The Second Auditor says the claim was allowed December 29, 1868, and sent to you to be forwarded. I am attorney of record for claimant. If any identification of claimant is necessary, please send blanks to her or me. Respectfully, &c., J. R. McLEOD. Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Washington, D....

Read More

Bounty Declaration of George M. Kesterson

Shelbyville, Missouri, June 21, 1869. Dear Sir: In the case of George M. Kesterson, deceased, Company L, Third Indian Home Guards, you wrote me in April last that the “claim was allowed December 29, 1868, in favor of Nancy Kesterson, as mother, and sent to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to be forwarded.” I immediately wrote the Commissioner, &c., a letter of inquiry, but have as yet received no answer from him. Please inform me how and where we are to get the money, as the old lady is becoming discouraged, and I am anxious to get it for her as soon as possible. Very respectfully, &c., J. R. McLEOD Hon. E. B....

Read More

Bounty Declaration of 28 Seminole Indians

We-Wo-Ka, Seminole Nation , ss: Be it remembered that on this 13th day of September, A. D. 1867, before me, E. J. Brown, acting United States agent for the Seminole Indians, personally came the persons mentioned below, who, being by me first duly sworn, and having the oath duly interpreted to them by Robert Johnson, United States interpreter, depose as follows: We were members of the First Regiment Indian Home Guards, in the company and under the captain designated opposite our names, and were honorably discharged. Some time in the month of _____, A. D. 186-, we delivered to J. W. Wright our certificates of discharge, made and subscribed the necessary declaration for the purpose of obtaining bounty, or back pay, to which we were entitled under the provisions of the act of Congress approved ____day of___, A. D. 186-. We also executed and delivered to the said J. W. Wright a power of attorney to act as our attorney in fact, and draw the bounty, or back pay, for us. We further state that up to this time we have not received the same, or any portion thereof, from the said J. W. Wright, or from any person for him, or from any source whatever. We make this declaration for the purpose of having the same paid to us as soon as possible, through the agent of our...

Read More

Bounty Application of Betsy Still

Tah-Le-Quah, Cherokee Nation: Betsy Still, of lawful age, and to me known to be a creditable person, being first by me duly sworn, upon her oath says: I am a citizen of the Cherokee Nation by birth, I am the widow of Cook Still: my husband enlisted in the Third Indian Regiment Home Guards, in the month of July 1862, and served until the – of 1863, about the 1st of January, when he was killed near Ray’s Mill, Arkansas. I got Spencer Stevens to make out the necessary papers, and put them into Wright’s hands for collection of bounty and back pay, if there was any due him. I came here, traveling about fifty miles, and called on Wright in July 1867. He inquired of me my name; I told him I was the widow of Cook Still, and wanted his bounty. He said it was not there; and I sat down and waited an hour, as it was raining very hard, and he turned to me and asked me what he could do for me. I told him I wanted my bounty. He talked a while, and said he would bet $50 he had my name. He got up and took up a bundle of papers and said, “Here it is.” He said what do you call your name? I told him it was Betsey; but I...

Read More

Bounty Application of W. G. Thornton

Tah-Le-Quah, Cherokee Nation: W. G. Thornton, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation, of lawful age, and to me well known to be a creditable person, after being by me first duly sworn, deposes as follows: I am a citizen of the Cherokee Nation; I am one of the associate judges of the supreme court of the Cherokee Nation. My son, Stephen Thornton, enlisted in the Third Regiment Indian Home Guards, in July, 1862, and served until some time in the summer of 1863, and died in the hospital at Fort Gibson of smallpox, in the fall of 1866. I called on John W. Wright at Fort Gibson to get my son’s bounty, he being a minor, and I was his legal heir. I went into the office of Judge Wright, where two or three clerks were employed, and they looked over the books and papers and said there was nothing there for me. I then went to see Judge Wright. He asked me if I came on any business. I told him I came to see about my son’s bounty. He asked me if I could not get it. I told him no. He asked me to walk with him; he went into the office where the clerks were paying off soldiers, and without saying anything counted me out $55, and handed it to me. He then told me...

Read More

Bounty Application of Allen Ross

Tah-Le-Quah, Cherokee Nation: Allen Ross, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation, being first duly sworn, deposes as follows: I enlisted in the Third Regiment Indian Home Guards on the 11th day of July 1862, as a private of Company I, and was discharged in May 1865. In the fall of 1865 one John W. Wright was here as an attorney to collect bounties, and it was understood that he would collect the bounty for 10 per cent of the amount collected. Ten per cent was the highest percent spoken of at any time. It was also understood that if Wright should get all of the claims of the three Indian regiments, that he would only charge 5 per cent, and I am satisfied that he got all of the claims to attend to. When he came out and commenced paying off the bounty, he only paid out $85, and charged 15 per cent, stating that he had been at a great deal of expense in getting the bounty allowed. I received only $85. ALLEN ROSS. Sworn to and subscribed before me this 11th day of October 1867. [No SEAL.] GEORGE M. ROSS, Clerk of Circuit...

Read More

Bounty Application of Jesse Bushyhead

Fort Gibson, Cherokee Nation: Jesse Bushyhead, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation, of lawful age, to me known to be a creditable person, after being by me first duly sworn, upon his oath says: I am a member of the Cherokee Nation by birth. I am a merchant by occupation. I enlisted in the Third Regiment Indian Home Guards on the 23d day of April 1863. Was promoted to sergeant major of said regiment, and served as such until the close of the war, and was honorably discharged and mustered out of the service on the 31st day of May, 1865. Some time in the summer of 1865 I delivered to John W. Wright my discharge papers, and gave him a power of attorney to collect my bounty. In the fall of 1866 Wright paid me $100, charging me nothing. He charged many others $15, when the general understanding was, when he was taking up the claims that he was not to charge over $10. I also know that a great many who put their claims into his hands at the same time I did have not got anything yet. I also know that many of those who have got their pay or a part of it have had to take it in goods out of the stock of F. H. Nash, a trader in Fort Gibson, in which...

Read More

Bounty Application of Lewis Bowers

Fort Gibson, Cherokee Nation: Lewis Bowers, of lawful age, a white man, but a citizen of the Cherokee Nation by marriage; he is well known to me to be a creditable person, and after being by me duly sworn, deposes as follows, viz: I enlisted in Company E, Second Regiment of Indian Home Guards, in the month of November, 1862; I was promoted to the rank of sergeant major of said regiment, and served until the close of the war, and was honorably discharged and mustered out of the service in the month of May, 1865. In the fall of 1865 I gave my discharge and a power of attorney to James G. Blount for collection of my bounty. General Blount was at my house some six months afterwards, and informed me that all the Indian soldier claims had been turned over to John W. Wright. I did not see Wright until about one year ago; he was here paying off soldiers. He told me then that he did not have my money, and could not tell when he could pay it. About two months ago Wright was here, and told me that the money was in Washington, ready for me, but that I would have to give him another power of attorney, and he would have my money here as soon as the mail could go to Washington...

Read More

Bounty Application of George Wiegand

Fort Gibson, Cherokee Nation; George Wiegand, a white man, and a citizen of the Cherokee Nation by marriage, being first duly sworn, upon his oath says: I enlisted in the Third Wisconsin Regiment, in the month of September 1863, and served nearly two years. I was wounded in fight on the Ozark Prairie. I was sent to Prairie De Chene, and was discharged on the 29th of July 1865. I gave John W. Wright my discharge in February 1867. He now informs me that on account of the governor of Wisconsin he could not get my money for two or three years. GEORGE WIEGAND. Sworn to and subscribed in my presence this 19th day of September 1867. J. F. MUNSON, First Lieutenant and Adjutant, Sixth...

Read More

Bounty Application of Tmine-har-jo

Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory, 88: On this 4th day of March, 1867, personally appeared before me, a district judge in and for the nation aforesaid, Tmine-har-jo, of the Creek Nation, personally known to me, who, being duly sworn according to law, declares that his age is – years, that he is a resident of the Creek Nation, and that he is the identical person who enlisted as a private in company B of the First Regiment of Indian Home Guards, to serve for the period of three years, and was discharged from the service of the United States as a private at Fort Gibson, on the 31st day of May, 1865, by reason of order No. 110, Department of Arkansas, and that there is additional bounty of $100 due him under the act of Congress approved July 28, 1866. And he does further declare that he has not bartered, sold, assigned, transferred, loaned, exchanged, or given away his final discharge papers, or any interest in the bounty provided by this or any other act of Congress; that he has not already received, or is entitled to receive any other or greater bounty than $100, and that the statement of service above given is a correct and true statement of any and all service rendered by him during the rebellion, and that he has never served otherwise than as stated....

Read More

Search


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest