Collection: History of Greene County Missouri

Biography of Judge William Cecil Price

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now William Cecil Price was born in Russell county, Virginia, April 1st, 1816, and is the third child of Crabtree and Linny C. Price, the family being of Welsh descent. His father was a farmer, who emigrated to Greene county, Missouri, in 1836. William had the advantage of a common English education in boyhood, and at twenty years of age was sent to Knoxville college, Tennessee. On returning from college he taught school in this county, and subsequently clerked in a general merchandise store, reading law whenever he had any spare time. In 1840 he was appointed deputy sheriff of Greene county, and one year later was appointed justice of the Greene county court, filling out an unexpired term. He was admitted to the bar in 1844, practiced law till 1847, and was then elected probate judge, holding the position for two years. In 1854 Judge Price was elected to the State Senate, but resigned in 1857 to accept appointment as judge of the 27th judicial circuit. In 1859 Gov. Stewart appointed him to represent Missouri as agent at the general land office at Washington, on the subject of swamp and overflowed lands, in which service he saved several hundred houses and acres of land for his State. President Buchanan appointed Judge Price, in 1860, to fill...

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Biography of Col. Fidelio Sharp Jones

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Col. Jones is the son of Col. Joseph and Matilda (Sewell) Jones, and was born in Tazewell, Claiborne county, Tennessee, July 19th, 1835. His father and mother were both Virginians, and the former was once colonel of militia in times of peace. Fidelio S. was the oldest of ten children, eight of whom lived to be grown. In 1837, his parents moved to Greene county, Missouri, locating at Springfield, where the subject of this sketch was reared and educated, and where both his parents died, the father in 1865, and the mother in 1881. In 1852 he began his business career as a live stock trader, and made a successful turn on cattle and mules. His father had purchased a farm in the country, and Fidelio went on the farm where he remained till 1856. He then began clerking for Sheppard & Kimbrough, and three years later bought an interest in the store, the new firm being Layton Jones & Co. Selling out this interest, he opened a general merchandise stock at Springfield, with a branch at Fayetteville. A. B. Stevenson was in charge of the latter, and Jones received no proceeds till after the war, when Stevenson, who had been a Confederate soldier, brought him $3,000 in Confederate money, which he had carried with him...

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Biography of Charles Warrington Rogers

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now This distinguished gentleman and successful railway manager was born at Exeter, N. H., Oct. 7, 1834. His parents were of English parentage, and he is a lineal descendant of the martyr John Rogers. His maternal Grandfather, Enoch Poor, was a general in the Revolutionary army. His father, a banker, died when Charles was two years of age, and his mother died eight years later, thus leaving him an orphan at that tender age; nevertheless his early education was not neglected, as his native New England is proverbial for good schools. At the age of fifteen be went to sea as a sailor boy, and when sixteen years old he made the voyage to California round Cape Horn. He remained in California three years and then resumed seafaring and engaged upon a vessel trading between that State and the East Indies. He afterwards became captain of the merchant-ship “Winfield Scott,” and upon that vessel circumnavigated the globe. In 1863 he placed his services at the disposal of the Federal government and was appointed acting ensign and commander of the gunboat “Hydranga,” remaining in the service until November, 1865, participating in the naval operations in the vicinity of Charleston, S. C. After being promoted to the grade of acting master, he within four months embarked again in the...

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Biography of Capt. George M. Jones

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Capt. Jones is the son of Henry F. and Mary (Waller) Jones, and was born in Shelby county, Tennessee, Oct. 19th, 1836.His father is still living there, aged eighty-one. His mother died in l856. George M. grew up on the farm, receiving his education at the common schools of the county where he lived. At the age of seventeen he went to Memphis, Tenn., and sold dry goods for the firm of Cossitt, Hill & Talmadge. He remained with them something over three years, receiving for his first year’s service, $75.00 and board; for the second, $100.00, and the third, $150.00. He came to Springfield, Missouri, in January, 1858, but went back to Tennessee after a short time. In the fall of the same, year he returned to Springfield and engaged in the general merchandising business, the firm being Miller, Jones & Co. He only remained here a year when be went to Dillon, Phelps county, Missouri, and embarked in the forwarding and commission business, which he carried on until the war broke out in 1861. In June of that year he enlisted as a private, in Capt. Dick Campbell’s company of Independence, Mo. State service, in the interest of the South. He was next transferred to Foster’s regiment, Company A, McBride’s division, C. S. A....

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Biography of Capt. S. H. Julian

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Captain Julian is the son of Isaac and Nancy (Wood) Julian, and was born, in Monroe county, Tennessee, April 4, 1822. When he was fifteen years of age his parents moved to Greene county, Missouri, and settled the farm in Cass township, where they both afterwards died. Stephen grew to manhood upon the farm, and on May 15, 1842, was married to Miss Sarah L. Vestal, of Putnam county, Indiana, but a native of North Carolina. They were blessed with six children, Flavius C., Melcena M., Mary L., John C. (deceased), Robert F. and William R. He built a house where he now lives, and in 1852, he took a drove of cattle across the plains to California. He returned by the isthmus of Panama to New Orleans and reached home in 1853. In 1857, he made another trip for the same purpose, returning via New York, reaching home in 1858. When the war came he espoused the Union side, and raised a company of cavalry for three years’ service in April, 1862, for the M. S. M. He commanded that company a year, and, was then appointed recruiting agent for this district. In January, 1864, he was elected captain of a battery, and was with Gen. A. J. Smith, who followed Price when that general...

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Biography of Daniel C. Kennedy

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Mr. Kennedy was born in Queens county, Ireland, February 14, 1841, and is the third child of Michael and Elizabeth (Condron) Kennedy. His parents emigrated to America in 1843, and in 1848 his father went back to Ireland to assist his countrymen in their struggle for independence. The agitation being suppressed by the government, he returned to America and settled permanently with his family in St. Louis, where be died in 1863, in the sixtieth year of his age. Daniel C. received a common school education in the city of St. Louis, and at the age of fourteen entered the printing office of Keith & Woods, and imbibed a taste for work of that nature, which ultimately led to his being one of the loading journalists of the Southwest. He worked in different offices and read law in his leisure moments. At the beginning of the late war he espoused the cause of the South, and joined the St. Louis militia, and was captured by Captain Lyon at Camp Jackson. When exchanged young Kennedy went to Memphis, Tennessee, where he joined an artillery company, which was ordered to reinforce Gen. Price at Springfield, Missouri. His company was with Price when he retreated to the Boston Mountains, Arkansas. After the battle of Pea Ridge it was ordered...

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Biographical Sketch of Alfred A. Lowdermilk, M. D.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Dr. Lowdermilk is the son of William and Martha (Rhodes) Lowdermilk, and was born in Greene county, Tennessee, June 24, 1848. In 1856, his parents moved to Sangamon county, Illinois, taking young Alfred with them. At fourteen years old, he started out to make his own living and learned the trade of tinsmith, which he followed till he was twenty-one years old. He then, in 1869, entered and took a course of lectures in the Louisville Medical College. The next year he began the practice in Vernon and Barton counties, this State, thus acquiring the means to complete his professional education. Returning to Louisville in 1875, he took a second course of medical lectures, graduating therefrom in 1876. Soon after this he began the practice in Illinois and continued till 1880, when he located at Bois D’Arc in this county, where he practiced actively till the fall of 1882. His failing health there necessitated his quitting active practice, and he opened a drug store, and has done only office practice since then. Dr. Lowdermilk has been a member of the I. O. O. F. lodge since he was twenty-one years old in which he has filled various offices. He is also a member of the Grand Lodge. February 13, 1866, he was married to Miss Lizzie...

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Biography of Dr. Joseph M’Adoo

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The subject of this sketch was born in Donegal county, Ireland, August 9, 1832. His parents were Thomas and Esther Rankin McAdoo, and Joseph was the oldest of six children, four brothers and two sisters. He came to America with his parents in 1838, locating near West Greenville, Mercer county, Pennsylvania, and there resided till he completed his education, which was partially obtained in the common schools of the county, and completed at Westminister College, and at Philadelphia. He began teaching school at eighteen, teaching in several districts, where others failed because of bad order in the school room. Young McAdoo’s executive ability enabled him to bring order out of chaos and to pass class after class through the advanced arithmetical course in the short term of three months. For four years he carried on coal and ore mining operations quite successfully, but quit to finish his education. He located in Tiffin, Ohio, in 1856, where be began the successful practice of medicine. During the civil war, he was, a part of the time, connected with the Ohio National Home Guards, and, in 1864, was chosen first lieutenant of Co. A, 164th Reg. Ohio Vol. Infantry, and at the close of his term, was complimented by President Lincoln. In 1865 he came to Missouri in search...

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Biography of John L. M’Craw, Sr.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Mr. McCraw was born in Hawkins county, Tenn., in 1808, where he was reared and educated. In 1886 he married Elizabeth H. Kenner of the same county, and the same year he immigrated to Greene county, Mo., and bought the farm in Taylor township, where he lived and died. In farming and stock-rearing he encountered all the hardships incident to pioneer life. The stock did well upon the prairie grasses, and sheep and pigs found natural enemies in the wolves that infested the country at the time. Mills were few and far between, coffee and biscuits luxuries that could be only indulged in Sunday mornings and when “company” came. The clothing for the family was all made from the raw material by the ladies of the household, Mr. McCraw, himself, making the shoes from leather tanned by a neighbor. Game abounded, but he never killed but one deer, and that with his Jacob-staff while out surveying. He was elected county surveyor in 1839 and in 1840 surveyed the eastern boundary of the county. In 1849 he visited his parents in Tennessee, making, the entire trip upon horseback. His wife died in 1855, leaving him six children, four boys and two girls, all of whom are yet living. Two children, a son and daughter, died before her....

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Biography of William M’Kerrall

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now This well-known subject was born in Orange county, N. C., June 17,1824. At sixteen he received the appointment to West Point Military Academy, and entered same class with Gen. Hancock. He was compelled to leave school, however, on account of ill health, and returned to North Carolina. There he entered Caldwell Institute, John Wilson, D.D., president, and took a regular collegiate course. At the outbreak of the Mexican war, young McKerall volunteered and was elected first lieutenant of Co. E of the North Carolina regiment, which company he served with during the war, latterly as acting captain. On one occasion, Lieut. McKerall commanded a detachment on escort, and conducted a supply train 180 miles without loss or mishap, except guerilla skirmishes. He was introduced to Gen. Taylor, and made his report on the same day the Missouri volunteers under Col. Doniphan were returning from the arduous campaign in New Mexico. After the battle of Buena Vista, his regiment encamped 14 months on the plains there, and was subsequently garrisoned at Saltillo, where Lieut. McK. Studied Spanish under Dr. Gregg, of St. Louis. Still later, he served as regimental inspector and commissary. He was honorably discharged at Old Point Comfort, Va. He then settled in Louisiana, where he studied law. In 1850, he went to Texas, locating...

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Biography of Samuel Henry Melcher

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Samuel Henry Melcher is the son of Woodbury Melchor, Esq:, and a grandson of Capt. Samuel B. French, was born in Gilmanton, N. H., October 30, 1828. Was educated at Gilford and Gilmanton academies; graduated at medical department, Dartmouth College, in Grafton county, N, H.; then in Boston, Mass., until 1859, when he traveled South and through Texas; and at the close of that year, settled in Potosi, Washington county, Missouri. On the breaking out of the war, he offered his services at once to Gen. Lyon, at St. Louis arsenal; and was mustered in as assistant surgeon 5th Regt. Mo. Vols. (three months), May 7, 1861. Was with his regiment at the battles of Carthage, July 5, 1861; Dug Spring, August 2, 1861; Wilson’s Creek, August 10, 1861, where he was the last officer on the field after the forces fell back, and brought off the body of Gen. Lyon and delivered it to Gen. Schofield the same night, as narrated on other pages of this volume. By order of Gen. Schofield, he remained a prisoner in the hands of the Confederates, to take care of the Union wounded. Was in Springfield when the “Fremont Body Guard” made their terrific charge, and attended the wounded on both sides; was furnished with wagons by Gen. Sigel,...

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