Sarah A. Tuttle Buried At Elgin

Sarah A. Tuttle, resident of Oregon since her birth in Benton County Nov. 11, 1858, and a continuous resident of Union county for 57 years, was buried in the family plot of the cemetery at Elgin this afternoon, following services conducted at the First Presbyterian church. C. E. Calame, of the Elgin Methodist church, of which deceased had long been a member, officiated at the services, which also included regular ritualistic services of the Order of Eastern Star.

Mrs. Tuttle, who would have been 76 years of age Nov. 11, suffered infection in her leg only about 10 days preceding her death, which occurred at Elgin Tuesday evening, Sept. 18. Until that time she had been attending to her usual household duties.

Mrs. Tuttle, wife of Adin R. Tuttle, who founded the Elgin Recorder in February 1891, and published that newspaper until his death in September 1904, was one of eight children born to Warren and Malissa Garrett, who crossed the plains from Tennessee to Benton county in 1850. She moved with her parents to Union county in 1866, settling near Summerville. Dec. 29, 1877, she was united in marriage to Adin R. Tuttle, then a young school teacher of the county and member of another well known pioneer family.

This union five children were born, Lee, former editor of The Recorder and for the past 11 years engaged in newspaper work in Southern Oregon cities, being the only survivor. Roy and Guy, eldest sons, were victims of the black diphtheria plague that swept over Grande Ronde valley in 1880-81. Terry, another son, was among the contingent of American troops who lost their lives when the British transport Tuscania was torpedoed off the coast of Ireland in February 1918. Lottie, the only daughter died in 1926.

In addition to her son Lee, other close surviving relatives are three brothers: R. W. and E. H. Garrett of Elgin, and C. F. Garrett of Gilliam county.

Mrs. Tuttle united with the First Methodist church at Elgin over 30 years ago, and was one of the early members of Blue Mountain chapter No. 52, O. E. S., at Elgin. For many years, in fact until declining health cause her to give up some of her activities, she took an active interest in civic affairs at Elgin and was a member of the Women’s Improvement club at the time of her death. Pride in attractive home surroundings was one of her chief characteristics, and her garden of beautiful flowers is familiar to the many people who have had occasion to pass by her home which is located on the Wallowa Lake highway in Elgin. Devoted to members of her family and ever ready to extend assistance to those in illness and distress, her passing causes a pang of regret throughout the north end of the county and is grieved by friends all over the county.

La Grande Evening Observer
Friday September 21, 1934
Front Page
Contributed by: Tom Childers