Elgin, Union County, Oregon

Death of A. R. Tuttle
Well Known Citizen and Editor of Elgin Recorder Passes Away

The grim reaper, death, has again visited our community and has taken from our midst one of its most prominent citizens. A.R. Tuttle was well known throughout Union and adjacent counties, having been a resident of this county for more than forty years.

He was born in Marion County, Iowa, May 6, 1859, and when three years of age crossed the plains with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Terry Tuttle, settling on Willow Creek, in the extreme northern part of Grande Ronde Valley. He resided here until manhood with his parents, and acquired an education in the common schools of the county which enabled him at an early age to engage in the profession of teaching, which occupation he followed for about ten years, making one of the county’s best educators.

On December 29, 1877, Mr. Tuttle married Miss Sarah Garrett. To this union was born six children, three of whom, Lee, Terry and Lottie, are left, with their mother, to mourn the loss of a kind and considerate husband and father.

In February, 1891, Mr. Tuttle, in connection with G.B. Swinehart, founded The Elgin Recorder, an independent weekly newspaper, the first in the town of Elgin. Shortly after starting the paper, Mr. Tuttle became sole proprietor, and continued so until December, 1901, when, on account of failing health, he disposed of the paper to L. Couch.

The following May he went to Portland and underwent, a surgical operation, from the effects of which he seemed to completely recover. After a period of rest, he, in company with his son, Lee, again became editor and proprietor of The Elgin Recorder and so continued until the time of his death. During his editorial career he was quite prominent in local politics, being at one time a candidate on the Democratic ticket for State Representative.

Mr. Tuttle was a member and past master of the local lodge of A.F. & A.M., also a prominent member of the Knights of Pythias and Woodmen of the World, in which orders he carried life insurance to the amount of $3,000.

Mr. Tuttle’s last illness was of the same nature as that of two years ago, and began about three weeks since. On last Saturday it was decided to take him to the hospital at Portland to ascertain the advisability of another operation. The physicians decided he was to weak to undergo an operation. He failed very rapidly and finally passed away Tuesday morning, September 27, 1904. His wife and his brother, John, had accompanied him to Portland, and they had the remains shipped here for interment. The funeral services were conducted by the pastor of the M.E. Church from the Presbyterian Church, under the auspices of the different lodges of which he was a member. A long concourse of people paid the last tribute of respect to the memory of the deceased by making the funeral one of the msot largely attended that ever occurred in the north end of the country.

In the death of Mr. Tuttle the community sufferes the loss of a good citizen who valored during his lifetime for its advancement. The sympathy of the entire community is with the bereraved family.

A Friend

Elgin Recorder September 30, 1904


ACROSTIS
In Memory of the late A. R. Tuttle
Alas the loved ones taken home
Released from Pain and sore distress
Though friends may his departure mourn;
Undying love will all each breast
‘Tis hard to part with these we love,
Though we must bow to Heaven’s high will
Let god, who rules and reigns above
Each worthy soul with glory fill.
– A.H. Wood

Elgin Recorder Friday September 30, 1904