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Umpqua Tribe

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Umpqua Indians. An Athapascan tribe formerly settled on upper Umpqua river, Oregon, east of the Katish.  Hale1 said they were supposed to number not more than 400, having been greatly reduced by disease.  They lived in houses of boards and mats and derived their sustenance mainly form the river.  In 1902 there were 84 on Grande Ronde Reservation, Oregon.  Their chief village was Hewut.  A part of them, the Nahankhuotana, lived along Cow Creek.  All the Athapascan tribes of south Oregon were once considered divisions of the Umpqua.  Parker2 named as divisions the unidentified Palakahy, the uncertain Skoton and Chasta, and the Chilula and Kwatami.

Footnotes

  1. Hale, Ethnology and Philology, 204, 1846 

  2. Parker, Jour., 262, 1842 


MLA Source Citation:

Hodge, Frederick Webb, Compiler. The Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. Bureau of American Ethnology, Government Printing Office. 1906. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 5 May 2016.
https://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/umpqua-tribe.htm
- Last updated on Jul 20th, 2014

This page is part of a larger collection. Access the full collection at Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico.

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