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Kelley Family of New Bedford, MA

KELLEY (New Bedford family Haverhill branch). At New Bedford for several generations have lived what for designation may be termed the Haverhill-New Bedford Kelleys. Reference is made to some of the descendants of William Kelley and his wife Abigail (Cannon) Kelley, both natives of the town of Haverhill, one of whose sons, the late Henry C. Kelley, was in the earlier half of the nineteenth century a merchant in New Bedford, and his son, the present Charles Sampson Kelley, since young manhood has been one of the most active and useful citizens of the city, having coupled his name with most if not all of the projects which have tended to the developing and modernizing of the city, one whose efforts in this direction have been especially conspicuous; and who, as a business man, banker and broker, is the architect of his own successful career.

The name Kelley, which was originally spelled Kelleigh, can be traced back to a period prior to the Norman conquest, and its barons are undoubtedly descended from the ancient Britons. The principal manorial seat of the family in England has been for many centuries located in the small parish of Kelly (or Kelley) in Devonshire. Burke and Shirley both agree as to its great antiquity, and the latter asserts that the Kellys have been lords of the manor from the reign of Henry II. (1154-1189). All the Kelleys in New England prior to 1690, with the exception of David Kelley of Yarmouth, Mass., freeman, 1657, and possibly one other family, appear to have been of English origin, and in all probability were of the Devonshire stock.

Indians in Mason County Michigan 1880 Census

These 355 people were identified as Indians (I) in column 4 (color) of the 1880 census for Mason County Michigan. In order to have been enumerated they are believed to either have renounced tribal rule, and under state law, exercised their rights as citizens; or because they “mingled” with the white population of these Michigan towns were enumerated under the expanded definitions.

Descendants of Peter Crapo

Through the greater part of the last century and up to the present writing, the name of Crapo has stood in and about New Bedford as a synonym for useful citizenship. Here have lived during that period Henry Howland Crapo and William W. Crapo, father and son, of whom a...

Charlevoix High School Yearbooks, Charlevoix Michigan

These are Charlevoix high school yearbooks for Charlevoix, Charlevoix County, Michigan. If your ancestor attended high school during the years of 1924, 1945-2008 then the following yearbooks may have a photograph of them. This is part of a collection of free yearbooks being scanned and placed online by the cooperation between the Charlevoix Public Library, Friends of the Charlevoix Public Library, and a local company, Village Graphics, who performed the digitization.

1901 Charlevoix County MI Plat Book

The 1901 Charlevoix County MI Plat Book, a beautiful historical piece, full of interesting tidbits of information about properties, is now available digitally. Digitization was made possible through a generous donation by the Friends of the Charlevoix Public Library....

Michigan Divorce Records from 1897-1952

Michigan began requiring divorce records to be recorded on a county level in 1897, however, some counties began recording them as early as 1892.There are two sets of information for this database. The first, comprises images, and an index to those images, of Michigan divorce records for the years of 1897-1938; the second contains only an index of records from 1939-1952. In total, however, you have access to divorce records issued in Michigan for the years 1897-1952, and a few earlier then that.

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