Location: Zanesville Ohio

Through Ohio And Kentucky

Sunday, Oct. 18.–Myself and friend proceeded on our journey. We arrived at Siers, a distance of thirty miles, at dusk, much relieved by the change from our horses to the wagon. The roads were muddy, the weather drizzly and the country hilly. Buildings indifferent. The land very fertile and black. Trees uncommonly tall. Passed the little village of Cadis. In this country a tavern, a store, a smith shop and two or three cabins make a town. Passed ten or fifteen travelers. Great contrast between the quality of the land from Chambersburg to Pittsburg, and that which we have already traveled over from Steubenville in Ohio. Monday, Oct. 19.–Left Siers at 6 o’clock a. m. The morning fair and cold. Roads extremely rough. Country fertile, but hilly. Log cabins, ugly women and tall timber. Passed a little flourishing village called Freeport, settled by foreigners. Yankee Quakers and mechanics. Remarkable, with two taverns in the village, there was nothing fit to drink, not even good water. The corn fields in the woods among dead trees and the corn very fine. We arrived at Adairs, a distance of twenty-seven miles, at 6 o’clock p. m. Passed some peddlers and a few travelers. Value of land from Steubenville to Adairs from $2 to $30 per acre. Lots in Freeport, eighteen months old, from $30 to $100. This day being Monday and the...

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Biography of Frank Ewing

Frank Ewing began the study of law with R. W. P. Muse, of Zanesville, Ohio, in 1856, and was admitted to the bar in 1859 by the Supreme Court of Ohio; From 1846 to 1867 he was a successful farmer in that State, and during the last nine years of his residence there held the office of justice of the peace. In 1867 he removed with his wife and two sons to Daviess county, Missouri, and located in Gallatin, where he engaged for two years in mercantile pursuits. The same year he was also enrolled as a member of the Daviess county bar. In 1870 he was elected justice of the peace, and, with the exception of an intermission of two years, has held that position ever since. He has, also, most efficiently served as supervisor of the City of Gallatin for the past ten years, and as such has had charge of all the public improvements in said city. Mr. Ewing is a man of commanding personal appearance, standing six feet high and weighing 215 pounds. He is, so far as education is concerned, a self-made man, having made himself what he is by hard study, perseverance and industry. He possesses more than average ability, and is a man of acknowledged good judgment and sound opinion. His intellect is bright and has that scope and capacity to grasp...

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Slave Narrative of Ben Brown

Interviewer: Albert I Dugan Person Interviewed: Ben Brown Location: Keen St., Zanesville, Ohio Age: 100 Occupation: Railroad worker Yes suh I wuz a slave in Vaginyah, Alvamaul (Albermarle) county an’ I didn’t have any good life, I’m tellin’ you dat! It wuz a tough life. I don’t know how old I am, dey never told me down dere, but the folks here say I’m a hunderd yeah old an’ I spect dats about right. My fathah’s name wuz Jack Brown and’ my mammy’s Nellie Brown. Dey wuz six of us chillun, one sistah Hannah an’ three brothers, Jim, Harrison, an’ Spot. Jim wuz de oldes an’ I wuz next. We wuz born on a very lauge plantation an dey wuz lots an’ lots of other slaves, I don’t know how many. De log cabins what we live in[HW:?] on both sides de path make it look like a town. Mastah’s house wuz a big, big one an’ had big brick chimneys on de outside. It wuz a frame house, brown, an’ set way back from de road, an’ behind dat wuz de slaves’ quarters. De mastah, he wuz Fleming Moon an’ dey say he wuz cap’n in de wah of 1812. De missy wuz Parley Moon and dey had one son an fouh daughters. All us chillun an mammy live in a log cabin dat wuz lauge enuf foh...

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Biographical Sketch of Robert Newell

ROBERT NEWELL. – “Doc” Newell, as he was commonly called, was one of the same breed of pioneers as Jo Meek. He was, in fact, associated with the latter for many years in the wild, trapping life on the border; and when that was given up he went with the rest of the little company of trappers to Oregon and became one of the state-builders there. He was born near Zanesville, Ohio, on the 30th of March, 1807. After having spent some time in Cincinnati, in learning the saddler’s trade, he was led by his adventurous disposition to go with a trapping party, in his eighteenth year, to the Rocky Mountains. It was there that he became acquainted with Joe Meek. Te friendship of the two rough but warm-hearted trappers deepened into the closest intimacy; and in after years they stood by each other through thick and thin. Newell went with Meek, Doty, Walker, Wilkins, Ebberts and Larison, in 1840, to the Tualatin Plains, where most of the number became permanent residents. Newell himself bore an honorable part in the affairs of the growing state; and, although he had had few advantages of early education, he possessed a natural intelligence and force of character which gave him due recognition among the strong-headed men of our early epoch. He was married in 1846 to Rebecca Newman, of Marion county. In...

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Biography of John M. Silcott

Almost forty years have passed since John M. Silcott took up his residence in Idaho, and he is therefore one of the oldest and most widely known pioneers of the state. He came in the spring of 1860 to establish the government Indian agency at Lapwai, and has since been identified with the growth and development of this section. He is a Virginian, his birth having occurred in Loudoun County, of the Old Dominion, January 14, 1824. His French and Scotch ancestors were early settlers there, and during the Revolution and the war of 18 12 representatives of the family loyally served their country on the field of battle. William Silcott, the father of our subject, married Sarah Violet, a lady of Scotch ancestry, and about 1828 they removed with the family to Zanesville, Ohio, where the father engaged in business as a contractor and builder. He was liberal in his religious views, and his wife held the faith of the Presbyterian Church. His political support was given the Whig party and the principles advocated by Henry Clay. Only two children of the family of five are now living, the sister being Sarah T., who married Captain Abrams, of Brownsville, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Abrams now makes her home in Baltimore, Maryland. In 1845 the family removed to St. Louis, where both the parents died. Mr. Silcott received a common-school education...

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Biography of Thomas J. Reynolds

Thomas J. Reynolds. The “Poot of the Wakarusa” was the title bestowed upon that beloved old pioneer of that section, Thomas J. Reynolds. He was a man better versed in the arts and skill of the woodsman, the plainsman, the humter, the miner and the pioneer than making poetry, but there was a fine spirit dwelling in his nature, and it found expression in such a way as to bring him the title above noted. He arrived in Kansas in 1854 and pre-empted land near where Wakarusa now stands. Thomas J. Reynolds was a native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, born in 1812 and of Welsh ancestry. His early life was spent in and around Pittsburgh. While growing up he received better than the average education of the time, but what he knew of practical affairs far transcended his knowledge of books. He learned the glass-blower’s trade and followed that occupation for a number of years. He also kept a store in Pittsburgh at one time. In 1848 gold was discovered in California. News reached the East a few months later, and early in the following year began that exodus of the California ’49ers. Among them was Thomas J. Reynolds, who went west overland. Those who made fortunes on the Pacific Coast during the following years are pretty well known. The majority, however, had only their experience to show for the...

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Biography of Milton F. Ward

Milton F. Ward. Among the business men of Kansas, there are none more far-seeing and intelligent than those who make up the agricultural class. The career of a farmer is somewhat exacting, in that he may not choose his own times or seasons for labor, for Nature adjusts such matters; but it is not probable that any other vocation gives such large and certain returns for well-directed effort expended. When an agriculturist successfully produces large crops he may be called a capable husbandman, but when he is able also to profitably handle the yield of his fertile fields himself, he had won the title of superior business man. Such a man was the late Milton F. Ward, who for twenty years was engaged in agricultural pursuits in Shawnee County, and who was known alike as a skilled farmer and a man of excellent business judgment. Mr. Ward was born near Zanesville, Ohio, on a farm, June 17, 1832, a son of John and Katherine (Betz) Ward, his father being a farmer and carpenter of the Buckeye state. There were eight sons and four daughters in the family, and Milton F. was the eleventh in order of birth. His parents were honest, God-fearing people, in modest circumstances, who gave their children the best educations that they could afford, and Milton F. Ward attended the district schools of his native community,...

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Biographical Sketch of Paul J. Brown

Brown, Paul J.; automobile business; born, Zanesville, O., Nov. 10, 1864; public school education; started with The Jacob Smith Carriage & Wagon Co., 1875-1879; then went to Pittsburgh in various carriage and wagon shops; came to Cleveland in 1890; foreman for The Jacob Hoffman Wagon Co., 1890-1898; then went to Cincinnati with The O. Armleder Co. until 1901; returned to Cleveland and formed partnership with firm of Broc Carriage & Wagon Co.; upon incorporation of firm, in 1903, elected vice pres. and gen. mgr.; in 1908, sold his interest and retired to the farm; in 1909, formed the Brown Auto Carriage Co., pres. and gen. mgr.; member I. 0. O. F. and Automobile Club; Independent in...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel Walter Kelley

Kelley, Samuel Walter; physician, surgeon; born, Adamsville, Muskingum County, O., Sept. 15, 1855; son of Walter and Selina Catherine (Kaemmerer) Kelley; preparatory education, public schools, Zanesville, O., and St. Joseph, Mich.; M. D., Western Reserve University, Cleveland, 1884; also studied in hospitals in London; married Amelia Kemmerlein, of Wooster, O., July 2, 1884; chief dept. of diseases of children, Polyclinic, Western Reserve University, 1886-1893; prof. diseases of children, Cleveland College Physicians and surgeons (Med. Dept. Ohio Wesleyan University), since 1893; pediatrist City and St. Luke’s hospitals; pediatrist and orthopedist St. Clair Hospital; surgeon-in-chief Holy Cross Home for Crippled and Invalid Children; sec’y med. staff Cleveland City Hospital, 1891-1899, pres. 1899-1902; entered service as civilian surgeon Spanish American War; recommended for “efficiency in the field under most trying circumstances”; commander brigade surgeon of volunteers, with rank of major, Aug. 17, 1908. Editor: Cleveland Medical Gazette, 1885-1901; pres. Ohio State Pediatric Society, 1896-1897; chairman section on diseases of children, A. M. A., 1900-1901; pres. Association American Teachers of Diseases of Children, 1907-1908; member Association Military Surgeons of U. S., Ohio State Medical Ass’n, etc.; Republican. Author: About Children, 1897; In the Year 1800, 1904; Surgical Diseases of Children, 1909; also numerous original articles, editorials, essays, lectures,...

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Biographical Sketch of Emmet J. Strong

Strong, Emmet J.; hardware; born, Huntsburg, O., Jan. 31, 1862; son of Lyman and Ludia Curtis Strong; educated, public schools and Austinburg; married, June 7, 1893, Lenora Goodwin; issue; two sons, Lester, 17, and Stuart, 9; in 1893, organized The Curtiss Steel Roofing Co., located at Niles, O.; in 1900, reorganized and enlarged the business, moving to Zanesville, O., building a sheet and steel mill, operating under the name of The Muskingum Valley Steel Co.; in 1902, sold out in the above company, and came to Cleveland, purchasing an interest in the J. M. and L. A. Osborn Co.; connected with this firm as vice pres. and director; member Chamber of Commerce, Y. M. C. A., and Hough Avenue Congregational...

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Biography of Robert L. Queisser

Queisser, Robert L.; pres. The Queisser-Bliss Co.; born, Indianapolis, Ind., Aug. 9, 1866; son of Julius and Caroline J. Schliobitz Queisser; educated, Indianapolis public and high schools; married, Springfield, 0., Nov. 24, 1887, Jessie L. Fried; two sons, Charles Fried, and Robert L., Jr.; regimental adjutant, 3rd Regiment Inf., 0. N. G.; battalion adjutant 7th Regiment Inf., 0. N. G.; captain commissary, 5th Regiment Inf., 0. N. G.; aide-de-camp on staff of Gov. Judson Harmon, four years; former pres. Chamber of Commerce, Zanesville; spent early life in railroad work, leaving a responsible position in the traffic department of The Baltimore & Ohio R. R., to become mgr. of The Ohio Press Prick Co., of Zanesville, one of the subsidiary companies of the Hydraulic Press Brick Co., of St. Louis, Mo.; remained with that company five years, when with William H. Hunt and C. A. Bliss, organized The Hunt-Queisser-Bliss Co., of Cleveland, and entered the brick and builders supply business; three years ago, acquired Mr. Hunt’s interest in the Company, and the corporate name was changed to the Queisser-Bliss Co.; past pres. Brick Building Ass’n of America; sec’y Ohio Face Brick Manufacturing Ass’n; sec’y-treas. The Face Brick Dealer’s Ass’n of America: pres. and mgr. The Queisser-Bliss Co.; Past Exalted Ruler, Springfield, O., Lodge, No. 51, B. P. O. Elks of the U. S.; member Emanuel Lodge, No. 505, F. &...

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Biography of Lewis C. Nelson .

Lewis C. Nelson. The large industries in and about Coffeyville have naturally drawn to that city many of the expert technical men as well as business executives, and one of these is Lewis C. Nelson, superintendent of the Ludowici-Celadon Company, manufacturers of hollow roofing tile. Mr. Nelson as a young man became an expert wood worker, later developed a proficiency and familiarity with the pottery industry and for a number of years has been one of the trusted officials of the present company. His birth occurred in Glasgow, Scotland, July 15, 1871. His father Charles W. Nelson, who was born in the vicinity of Glasgow in 1842 was a weaver in the woolen mills, and died at Glasgow in 1884. He was a conservative in politics and an active member of the Episconal Church. He received military training as a soldier in the English army. Charles W. Nelson married Ida Froley, who was born near Glasgow in 1847 and died there in 1877. L. C. Nelson, the only child of his parents, was six years old when his mother died, and thereafter he received a rudimentary training in the public schools of Glasgow. At the age of twelve he was brought to the United States by his uncle John Nelson, who established his home at Boston. Since that time Mr. Nelson has been largely dependent upon his own resources...

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King, John – Obituary

Elgin, Union County, Oregon A Direct Descendant of the Pilgrim Fathers, and an Honered Pioneer of Eastern Oregon At the home of his daughter, Mrs. E.L. Harris, in Elgin. December 12, 1904. John King, aged 84 years, 9 months, 10 days. The deceased was among the well known citizens of Union and Wallowa counties, in which territory he had made his home since 1882. A son of Jacob King, one of Ohio’s pioneer settlers, he was able to trace his lineage directly to the Pilgrim Fathers, whose landing at Plymouth Rock in 1820 (Says 1820) marked one of the events which were to have distinctive quality in the history of our land. He was the third born in a family of eight children and was born near Zanesville, in Perry County, Ohio, March 2, 1820 of which family only three are now living. In 1849, on July 4th, he was united in marriage to Miss Maria A. Dawson, and to this union was born eight children, four of whom are now living. In early manhood he hewed out his home in the timbered regions on the south bank of the Maumee river, thirty miles from Teledo, Ohio, and here it was that his own family was born and reared. here, too, at his early home, he was wont to receive visits from many of Ohio’s great pioneers, among whom...

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Biographical Sketch of Col. Robert H. McFadden

Col. Robert H. McFadden, Pension Attorney and Police Magistrate, Mattoon; was born in Zanesville, Ohio, in 1833; his father was a cabinet-maker by trade, and at the age of 13 years, he began the trade, working five years under instructions; at 18, he began life for himself, following his trade about fifteen years; in 1850, he came to Shelby Co., Ill., and remained three years; in 1853, he came to Coles Co., and located in the village of Paradise; in the summer of 1855, he came to Mattoon; he built the first dwelling in the city limits, on what is now known as Charleston avenue, between East First and Union streets. He was married Sept. 28, 1855, to Sarah A. Norvell, by Elder Isaac Hart; theirs was the first wedding that occurred in Mattoon; at the first election held in Mattoon Tp., in 1857, he was chosen a Justice of the Peace; April 19, 1861, he entered the United States service as Second Lieutenant, in the 7th Regt. I. V . I.; he served as First Lieutenant, Captain and Major in the 418t Regt., and Lieutenant Colonel and Colonel in the 53d; July 22, 1865, he was mustered out of the service, and, on his return, followed his trade some three years; in 1871, he was elected Mayor of the city, having served one term as Alderman; in 1873,...

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Biographical Sketch of John Winkelblack

John Winkelblack, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Charleston; born in Dauphin Co., Penn., March 4, 1805, where he lived until 15 years of age, when he learned and worked at the tanner’s and currier’s trade at Harrisburg, Penn., until 1829, at which date he emigrated to Ohio, working at Cleveland, Massillon and Zanesville until February, 1830, when he went to Pennsylvania and the following spring returned to Zanesville, Ohio, where he followed his trade until the fall of 1835; he then emigrated to Illinois and located upon Sec. 30, Morgan Tp., where he now lives; upon locating here he entered 160 and purchased 236 acres of land, to which he afterward added until he held about 1100 acres, which he had accumulated by his own hard labor, energy and industry; when he first located here, wolves were plenty, and to obtain quail, prairie chickens, wild geese, ducks, turkeys or deer, it was only necessary to shoot from your own door or window; his trips to mill consumed from four to seven days, the distance being fifty miles, either to Roseville or Terre Haute, Ind.; although now in his 75th year, he is in possession of all his faculties, and daily attends to his stock, of which he has 70 head of cattle, 16 horses and 60 hogs. He married, March 4, 1841, to Catharine Weaver; she was born in...

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