Location: Yamhill County OR

Biography of Gen. Joel Palmer

GEN. JOEL PALMER. – There have been few men in Oregon more universally respected, or whom the people have more delighted to honor, than General Palmer. A plain, unpretentious man, who assumed absolutely nothing, he was nevertheless conscious of his superior abilities, and had no hesitancy in assuming commensurate responsibilities. For natural capacity and sagacity in great affairs, he ranks with the first men of our state, such as General Lane, Colonel Cornelius, Judge Kelly or Governor Gibbs. He reckoned himself as a New Yorker, both parents having been natives and residents of that state, although at the time of his birth they were on a temporary sojourn in Canada. His boyhood and youth were spent at the old home in the Empire state; and he early assumed the responsibilities of life, marrying, when but nineteen, Miss Catherine Caffey. Of their two children, Miss Sarah subsequently came to Oregon with her father and became the wife of Mr. Andrew Smith; and the other died in infancy, the mother not long surviving. Mr. Palmer was married again to Miss Sarah A. Derbyshire of Bucks county, Pennsylvania. That was in 1836. Soon afterwards he moved to Indiana, and, having become accustomed to the management of large works, took a contract to build portions of the White Water canal, and to complete the locks at Cedar Grove. During his stay in Indiana...

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Biographical Sketch of John A. Powell

The present efficient and courteous County Clerk is a native Oregonian. He received his education at Monmouth, having moved to Yamhill County, with his parents at an early age. In 1886 he moved to Grant County, locating on the middle folk of the John Day River, near Warm Springs, taking up a homestead and following stock rising. In 1892 he was appointed deputy sheriff, and in 1894 receiving the nomination for County Clerk from the Republican party, of which party he is a life long member, and was elected. As a public official, he proved eminently successful, due to his affability and knowledge of clerical duties. At the expiration of his term he was re-elected. In 1878 he married Miss Bessie Hutchcroft of Yamhill County, and has six...

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Biography of James Westley Hammack

James Westley Hammack, who is living on his ranch located one mile east of Lostine, has always devoted his energies to agricultural pursuits, and has met with a goodly measure of success. His life record was begun in Knox County, Kentucky, his parents being James and Elizabeth (Moore) Hammack, both of whom are now deceased, the father having passed away in 1899 and the mother in 1905. The early years in the life of James Westley Hammack were passed on the farm where he was born and in the cultivation of which he began to assist while still in his childhood. In common with many other lads reared in the country at that period he was given but a meager education, attending school only at such times as his services were not required about the farm. Under the capable supervision of his father he acquired a thorough knowledge of the best practical methods of tilling the fields and harvesting the crops, so that by the time he had attained his majority he was a skilled agriculturist. He subsequently left home and went out in the world to make his own way, but still continued to devote his energies to farming. Together with his wife and family he crossed the plains to Oregon in 1865 with an ox team, his destination being Yamhill county. He remained their for only two...

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Biography of Hon. William Rufus King

Among those granted representation in this volume, none is more worthy of notice, than the subject of this sketch. As a public spirited citizen he enjoys the confidence of the people and has become well and popularly known, not only throughout Malheur and adjoining counties, but throughout the whole state. On October 3. 1864, near Walla Walla. Washington, David R. King and Elizabeth (Estes) King, became the parents of a boy, whom they named William Rufus. His parents were pioneers of Walla Walla, Washington. Arriving from Arkansas in 1860 his father being captain of a large immigrant train, crossing what was known as “the plains”-the journey being through the dangerous Indian countries between the Mississippi and the Pacific coast. At the age of nine years he moved with his parents to Weston, Oregon, and five years later, in 1878, to Jordan Valley, in this County. After receiving his preliminary education in the common schools, he entered the Agricultural College, at Corvallis, Oregon, where he pursued his studies for three years. He re-turned again to the farm, but in 1889 left it to take up the study of law at the law school in Danville, Indiana. After graduating with high honors in 1891, he was admitted to practice by the supreme court of Indiana, and entered a law office in the city of Indianapolis. H remained there but a few...

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Atfalati Indians

Atfalati Indians were located on the Atfalati plains, the hills about Forest Grove and the shores and vicinity of Wapato; they are also said to have extended as far as the site of Portland, all in the present state of Oregon.

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Biography of N. K. Sitton

N.K. SITTON. – This pioneer of 1843 was born in Calway county, Missouri, in 1825. As a boy in school he read Lewis & Clarke’s travels, and being an active and intelligent youth seventeen years old, at the time of the great interest that prevailed in the border states respecting Oregon, was moved to join the party of Applegate Or Burnett, and made the journey with these noted men across the plains. he remembers meeting with Whitman on the Sweetwater, and recalls his services in guiding the emigrants from Fort Hall. Arriving in Oregon he found employment on various farms and at at a mill, but in 1846 took his Donation claim on the rich lands five miles north of McMinnville. he was married soon afterwards to Miss Percilla Rogers of Chehalem valley. There the young pair began life, and made a happy home in which they lived many years. In 1848 Mr. Sitton made the trip to California for his pot of gold, and got it. After his return he made rapid improvements upon his farm, developing grain and stock. By his first wife, who died in 1869, he reared a family of nine children: C.E., Caroline (Mrs. Rogers), Ora (Mrs. McColough, deceased), H.W., N.H., Fred D., Elbridge D., and two who died in infancy. He was married secondly to Mrs. Mary M. Laughlin, a daughter of Michael...

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Biography of Solomon M. Jeffreys

In the front rank of the columns which have advanced the civilization of the northwest, Solomon M. Jeffreys has led the way to the substantial development, progress and up building of Idaho, being particularly active in the growth of Weiser, where he still makes his home. He is numbered among the pioneers of Idaho, California and Oregon, his memory going back to the time when the entire Pacific coast was but very sparsely settled, when the Indians were more numerous than the white men, and the land had not been reclaimed for purposes of cultivation, but remained in the primitive condition in which it came from the hand of nature. Mr. Jeffreys was born in Jackson County, Missouri, February 11, 1835, and is of English lineage. His father, Thomas Jeffreys, was born in Kentucky and was married there to Miss Mary Dickerson. In 1845, with his wife and five children, he started for Oregon with a train of sixty wagons, drawn by oxen and mules, there being about two hundred persons in the company. They were nine months in making the long and tedious journey across the plains and endured many hardships and privations. Their route lay along the south and west banks of the Snake River, but they little dreamed that in the course of a few years members of their Party would locate in that beautiful district...

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Biography of Thomas M. Jeffreys

Thomas M. Jeffreys, probate judge and superintendent of public instruction in Washington County, Idaho, is a native of Oregon, his birth having occurred in Yamhill County, on the 7th of April 1852. His father, Woodson Jeffreys, was born in Jackson County, Missouri, in 1825, and in early manhood, in Oregon, married Jane Forrest, also a native of Missouri. They crossed the plains to Oregon in 1845, being nine months in accomplishing the long and weary journey across the plains, their way being beset by many obstacles, difficulties and dangers. They located on government land in Yamhill County, and during the first winter suffered many hardships and privations. Their stock of provisions was almost exhausted and they subsisted on boiled wheat and what game they could kill. Mr. Jeffreys also participated in the wars with the Indians in those early years of his residence in the northwest, and was a brave pioneer and a man of sterling character. In 1865 he came to Idaho, accompanied by his wife and five children, and purchased three hundred and twenty acres of land at Weiser, where he built a residence and began the development of the farm upon which his widow yet resides. In connection with his brother he was extensively engaged in stock raising, both in Oregon and Idaho. They were enterprising, ambitious and fearless, and recognizing an excellent business opportunity, they...

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Biography of Ephraim W. Baughman

Few men are more widely known in the northwest than Captain E. W. Baughman, of Lewiston, who for forty-eight years has sailed on the rivers in this section of the country. His circle of friends is indeed extensive, and his genial manner and social disposition win him the regard of all. He was born in Fulton County, Illinois, May 18, 1835, and is of German lineage, his ancestors having long been residents of Pennsylvania, however. His father, John Baughman, was born in that state and married Miss Jane Murphy, a lady of German descent. In an early day they removed to Illinois, settling in the west before the Black Hawk war. The father secured a farm in Fulton County and there reared his family of nine children, four of whom are yet living. He departed this life in the eightieth year of his age, and his wife passed away when about the same age Captain Baughman, their fifth child, was reared in the state of his nativity until his sixteenth year, and then crossed the plains with ox teams to California, in 1850. The party with which he traveled took with them a year’s provisions, but found they had more than they needed, and on reaching California they sold their surplus supply of flour, bacon, beans and sugar for two dollars per pound. The Captain engaged at placer mining...

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Biography of John McClellan

John McClellan, one of the earliest pioneers of Boise, Idaho, is a native of Ohio, born in Licking County, March 16, 1827, of Irish and English extraction, his paternal ancestors being Irish, his maternal, English. John McClellan, his father, was born in Ireland in 1777, and in the year 1820 came to America, landing at New York, where he remained for some time and where he was married to Miss Amanda Reed, a native of New York and a daughter of English parents. From New York they removed to Dresden, Ohio, where they resided until 1850 in which year he and his wife and seven children crossed the plains to Oregon, John, the subject of this sketch, at that time being twenty-two years of age. That year many of the overland emigrants died of cholera, and several of the company with which the McClellan family traveled were victims of that dread disease and were buried by the wayside, among them an aunt of our subject. His immediate family, however, made the trip in safety, and stopped first at Milwaukee, on the Willamette River, six miles above Portland. Later they removed to Yam Hill County and settled on a farm, where the father spent the rest of his life and died at the age of eighty-eight years. Of his family of seven who crossed the plains in 1850, only four...

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Biography of Robert C. Mays

ROBERT C. MAYS. – The well-known and capable business man, whose name appears at the head of this article, is one of the most widely known men of Union, and Wallowa counties, and is at the present time handling a large business as warehouseman at Elgin, where he is numbered among the leading residents of that thriving city, and he has made a record in this section that is both crowned with gratifying success from a financial standpoint, and wherein he has maintained a representation that is untarnished and displayed talents that properly place him among the real leaders in the county. On August 31, 1860, in McMinnville Oregon, our subject first saw the light, being the son of John C. and Martha J. (Nye) Mays, natives of North Carolina, who were married on June 22, 1851 in Missouri, Brown county,and the following year threaded the dreary plains and climbed the rugged mountains that separated eastern civilization from the western wilds, using for transportation ox teams. Settlement was made in Yam Hill county, three miles distant from McMinnville, and a donation claim of one-half section was secured. Work commenced in earnest to make a good home, and when sixteen years later Mr. Mays sold his farm it was one of the best and most finely improved in the entire valley. In 1869 they came to Walla Walla and thence,...

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Biography of Joel B. Harper

History has long since placed on its pages the names of those who, coming to the Atlantic coast, planted colonies in the New World and opened up that section of the country to civilization. As the years passed, and the population of that region rapidly increased, brave pioneers made their way into the wild districts farther west. The names of Daniel Boone and Simon Kenton were enduringly inscribed upon the records of Kentucky, that of John Jacob Astor upon the history of Michigan and other states of the upper Mississippi valley. Later Kit Carson and John C. Fremont made their way into the mountainous districts west of the “father of waters’ and subsequently the explorers penetrated into the vast wildnesses of the Pacific slope. The development of the northwest, however, is comparatively recent, but when time shall have made the era of progress here a part of the history of the past, the names of men no less brave and resolute than those who came to the shores of New England or made their way into the Mississippi valley will be found illuminating the annals of this section of the Union, and on the list will be found that of Joel Beauford Harper, who is numbered among the early settlers of both California and Idaho. Mr. Harper was born in Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky, October 15, 1837. His father,...

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Odell, Sarah Holman – Obituary

Her maiden name was Holman, and she was born in Kentucky, December 10, 1803. When she was about eight years of age, her parents moved to Indiana and settled in Wayne County. Here she grew up to womanhood; and there, on March 30, 1820, she was united in marriage to John O’Dell. In 1825 she and her husband moved to Tippecanoe County and in March 1826, they moved to Carroll County. Theirs was among the first white families settling in this county, and for a time the only white family in the township in which the town of Camden is situated. Their doors were thrown open wide to the pioneers who were seeking homes in that county and many availed themselves to their hospitality. In childhood she gave her heart to God and early in their married life she and her husband united with the Methodist Episcopal Church, under the ministry of Russel Bigelow. Their home was a Christian home, and they endeavored to bring up their children in the nurture and admonition of the Lord; and, as a result, their ten children who grew to manhood and womanhood were all converted early in life and united with the Methodist Episcopal Church. In the spring of 1851 they left their home in Carrol County for Oregon, by the overland route; and the last of September they reached Yamhill County,...

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Alderman, Albert Lockwood – Obituary

A. L. Alderman died at the home of his son near Dayton on Christmas Eve [December 24, 1908], aged 88 years. The funeral took place on Saturday, conducted by Rev. A. J. Hunsaker of this city an old-time friend and neighbor. Mr. Alderman was a Yamhill County pioneer of 1846. He was born at Old Bedford, Connecticut, December 16, 1820. The family home for most of his boyhood was near Warsaw, N.Y. He was 25 years old when he crossed the plains. His party came by way of Southern Oregon and lost their wagons in the Rogue River. Mr. Alderman took up a land claim near Dayton, and when the rush to California occurred in the summer of 1849 he went to the gold fields and stayed three months. He brought back some bags of gold dust with which he had a sawmill built on his place. Some of the oldest houses in Yamhill County were made from the lumber of this mill. In 1852 he was married to Mary Jane Burns of Polk County. She died in 1864, leaving four children. They are Mina (Mrs. F. K. Hubbard), William Alderman, Maritta, (Mrs. McCowan), all of whom live at Falls City, Polk County, and Medorum Alderman, now in California. In 1866 Mr. Alderman married Miss Charlotte Ruth Odell of Dayton. They had five children: Edwin, who died a year...

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Lambert, John A. – Obituary

John A. Lambert was born in Nashville, Tenn., Feb. 10, 1845, and died July 28, 1917, making him 72 years, 5 months and 18 days old. From Nashville he went with his parents to Illinois, and from there to Missouri.. In 1864 his parents died and he with an older brother crossed the plains, arriving in Oregon in December, 1869. He was converted and joined the Methodist Church of which he was a lifelong member. He was united in marriage to Miss Mary Ellen Coovert, March 13, 1870. Their home was on a farm four miles south of Dayton until 1904, when they moved to McMinnville, Ore. He leaves to mourn his death, three sons, Charles Lambert of Ritzville, Wash., Arthur Lambert of North Powder, Ore., Chester Lambert of McMinnville, and one daughter, Mrs. Juanita May Palmer of McMinnville, Ore. The cause of his death was hardening of the arteries from which he was a long-time sufferer. The funeral was held on Monday at the Methodist Church conducted by Rev. Lester D. Fields with burial in Masonic Cemetery. The pallbearers were Arthur McPhillips, M. F. Corrigan, O. D. Scott, Frank Odell, Sylvester Robinson and Ivan Daniels. [Interment Odell Cemetery] Contributed by: Shelli...

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