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Location: Yalobusha County MS

North America Indian Names of Places in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Louisiana

The Indians all over this continent had names, traditions, religions, ceremonies, feasts, prayers, songs, dances all, more or less, with symbolism and allegory, adapted to circumstances, just as all other races of mankind. But the world has become so familiar with the continued and ridiculous publications in regard to everything touching upon that race of people that a universal doubt has long since been created and established as to the possibility of refinement of thought and nobleness of action ever having existed among the North American Indian race, ancient or modern; and so little of truth has also been learned regarding the real and true inner life of that peculiar and seemingly isolated race of mankind, that today only here and there can one be found who, from a lifetime association and intimate acquaintance, is well versed in Indian thought, feeling and character, and able to unfold and record the solution of that imagined mystery known as “The Indian Problem,” since they learned it from the Indians themselves. From the Indians own lips they were taught its elucidation, and only as it could be taught and learned, but never again can be taught and learned. Even as various nations of antiquity of, the eastern continent have left the evidences of their former occupation by the geographical names that still exist, so to have the North American Indians left their...

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Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white successors from that day to this, all over this continent, but which to them, was as the tones of an alarm-bell at midnight. And one hundred and twenty-three years have passed since our forefathers declared all men of every nationality to be free and equal on the soil of the North American continent then under their jurisdiction, except the Africans whom they held in slavery, and the Native Americans against whom they decreed absolute extermination because they could not also enslave them; to prove which, they at once began to hold out flattering-inducements to the so-called oppressed people of all climes under the sun, to come to free America and assist them to oppress and kill off the Native Americans and in partnership take their lands and country, as this was more in accordance with their lust of wealth and speedy self-aggrandizement than the imagined slow process of educating, civilizing and Christianizing them, a work too con descending, too humiliating; and to demonstrate that it has been a grand and glorious success, we now point with vaunting pride and haughty...

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Biography of Sidney Thorne Able

(Sketch written by Judge Nelson E. Lurton, Commissioner of the United States Court, at Shanghai, China, who served in Mr. Able’s law office as his assistant from 1912 to 1916.) It is so unusual to find read merit displayed in a man until he has been put through some of the trying experiences of life that it is a pleasure to find such in one born and reared as Sidney Thorne Able was, surrounded with all the comforts of life, the son of a southern banker and cotton planter. In order to know a man well we must know something about his boyhood days. The photograph of his boyhood home reproduced from a small kodak picture, shows Sidney Thorne Able, a bare legged boy about to enter the Mississippi home in which he lived until he was seventeen years of age, when he came to St. Louis to enter Washington University. In the pony cart is his sister, Elise, now Mrs. George Doling Haynes of Kansas City. Much to the delight of the boy, the home was equipped with a complete gymnasium and with bowling alleys. As a boy he spent much time riding horses and upon Chatam plantation at Erwin, Mississippi, a plantation that extended almost the entire length of and along the north shore of Lake Washington and required over one hundred and twenty-five mules and a...

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Biography of J. H. Walters

J. H. WALTERS. To attain happiness we strive for the acquisition of wealth or position, and, if one is possessed of the first and has native ability and ambition, the second falls to him as his natural heritage. In the acquirement of wealth fortune smiles on those alone who are watching for the opportunity she offers, and J. H. Walters is one of those who has shown himself to be a wide-awake, systematic business man, and has made the most of every opportunity that has presented itself. He was born in Virginia, October 26, 1823, a son of William and Tally (Ingram) Walters, who were of Irish and English descent, the former a native of Virginia. The paternal grandfather was a captain in the Revolutionary War. J. H. Walters spent his youthful days on a farm, was married in the State of his birth, and in 1847 moved. to Yalobusha County, Miss., where he made his home until after the war, in which struggle he participated, and during which time he lost the handsome fortune which he had accumulated. He has devoted his attention to merchandising the greater part of his life and is still to some extent engaged in this occupation, his home being in Bellefonte. He has been largely engaged in the buying and selling of cattle and mules, and is the owner of about 15,000 acres...

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