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Location: Yakima Reservation

Klickitat Indians

Klickitat Indians. The original home of the Klickitat was somewhere south of the Columbia, and they invaded their later territory after the Yakima crossed the river. They joined in the Yakima treaty at Camp Stevens, June 9, 1855, by which they ceded their lands to the United States, and most of them settled upon the Yakima Reservation.

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Wenatchee Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Wenatchee Indians (Yakima; winätshi, ‘river issuing from a canyon,’ referring to Wenatchee river). A Salish division, probably a band of the Pisquows, formerly on Wenatchee river, a tributary of the Columbia in Washington.  In 1850 there were said to have been 50 on Yakima Reservation, but 66 were enumerated in the Report on Indian Affairs for 1910 as under the Colville agency.  It is uncertain whether these bodies belonged to one original...

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Klikitat Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Klikitat Indians, Klickitat Tribe, Klickitat Indians (Chinookan: ‘beyond,’ with reference to the Cascade Mountains. ). A Shahaptian tribe whose former seat was at the headwaters of the Cowlitz, Lewis, White Salmon, and Klickitat rivers, north of Columbia River, in Klickitat and Skamania Counties, Washington. Their eastern neighbors were the Yakima, who speak a closely related language, and on the west they were met by various Salishan and Chinookan tribes. In 1805 Lewis and Clark reported them as wintering on Yakima and Klickitat rivers, and estimated their number at about 700. Between 1820 and 1830 the tribes of Willamette valley were visited by an epidemic of fever and greatly reduced in numbers. Taking advantage of their weakness, the Klikitat crossed the Columbia and forced their way as far south as the valley of the Umpqua. Their occupancy of this territory was temporary, however, and they were speedily compelled to retire to their old seat north of. the Columbia. The Klikitat were always active and enterprising traders, and from their favorable position became widely known as intermediaries between the coast tribes and those living east of the Cascade range. They joined in the Yakima treaty at Camp Stevens, Wash., June 9, 1855, by which they ceded their lands to the United States. They are now almost wholly on Yakima Reservation,...

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Atanumlema Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Atanumlema Indians. A small Shahaptian tribe living on Yakima Reservation, on Atanum Creek, Washington. They are said to speak a dialect closely related to the Yakima and Klikitat. For Further Study The following articles and manuscripts will shed additional light on the Atanumlema. Mooney in 14th Rep. B. A. E., 738,...

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Pisquow Indian Bands, Gens and Clans

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Many tribes have sub-tribes, bands, gens, clans and phratry.  Often very little information is known or they no longer exist.  We have included them here to provide more information about the tribes. Camiltpaw (‘people of Kamilt’; so named from their chief). A band of the Pisquows, formerly living on the East side of Columbia River. One of the original treaty tribes of 1855, classed with the Yakima but really Salishan. They are now on Yakima Reservation,...

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Biography of George Benson Kuykendall, M.D.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now GEORGE BENSON KUYKENDALL, M.D. – This gentleman, one of the foremost physicians of Eastern Washington, was born near Terre Haute, Indiana, in the year 1843. When three years old he was taken by his father’s family to Wisconsin. In 1852 the family set out on the long, hard journey to the Pacific slope. That was the sad year of cholera and pestilence. Being somewhat late in starting, the Kuykendall family followed in the wake of sickness and death, the mournful evidences of which were most vividly impressed on the mind of the boy who afterwards became the man here described. many an abandoned wagon, many a dying animal, and many a hastily hollowed grave, did they pass. They themselves plodded wearily on, keeping double vigil, – on the sick and dying within, and the prowling savages without. When the train reached Snake river, they crossed in the hope of finding better grass. Here the father was taken sick with typhoid fever; and for many weeks he was dragged helpless and seemingly at the point of death, over the dusty and dismal wastes of Southern, Idaho. Finally, nearly all the family stock having died, the wagon was abandoned; and the family was put into the wagon belonging to a brother, who was sharing with them the difficult...

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Biography of Rev. James Harvey Wilbur

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now REV. JAMES HARVEY WILBUR, D.D. – It will not be claimed that the plain people, whose lives are briefly recorded in this volume, merit the title of greatness. They were simple honest men who did their duty. They merit a niche in the halls of our history, since it was they who hewed out the stones with which this stately structure has been built. It requires very great qualities to be called great. In many regards, such as self-reliance, ability to live alone with little or no inspiration or motive except such as they found within themselves, the power to propose their own plan and theory of life, and to hold their lives up to its requirements, the pioneers and frontiersmen of the Pacific coast show qualities very much like those of the great men of history; and we almost think that, if their field had been as great as that of others, their fame might not have been less. One of the great-hearted men of the early days, now passed away, was “Father Wilbur.” He has been everywhere known. His memory will be revered; and the boys of Oregon should be taught his heroic virtues. As a friend of the Indians, he deserves special mention; for the Indian War Veterans are most prompt of all...

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