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Location: Wyandotte Kansas

Biographical Sketch of Otis B. Gunn

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Otis B. Gunn was a native of Massachusetts, born at Montague, October 27, 1828, and before he came west as a railroad engineer, had served as rodman on the Hoosac Tunnel Railroad and superintendent of the construction work of the line between Rochester and Niagara Falls. In 1853 he was appointed division engineer in the building of the Toledo, Wabash and Western, and followed railroad construction westward until he settled at Wyandotte, Kansas, in 1857. He was a member of the 1861 State Senate, and while thus serving was appointed major of the Fourth Kansas, later the Tenth Kansas Infantry. Resigning in May, 1862, he resumed railroad work, being connected, at varions times, with the Kansas City and Cameron, Leavenworth, Pawnee and Western Central Branch of the Union Pacific, and the Missouri, Kansas and Texas. Of the road last named he built 600 miles; also constructed the bridge across the Missouri River at Atehison, and in 1876 constructed the union depot in Kansas City. In view of these unadorned facts, it is perhaps needless to add that Mr. Gunn was one of the leading engineers of the West. He died in Kansas City, February 18, 1901, and was buried in Oak Grove,...

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Biographical Sketch of Dr. Joseph P. Root

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Dr. Joseph P. Root, who was one of the early physicians of Wyandotte, then a part of Leavenworth County, was born at Greenwich, Massachusetts, April 23, 1826, and died at Kansas City, Kansas, July 20, 1885. He was a member of the Connecticut-Kansas Colony, better known as the Beccher Bible and Bifle Company, which settled at Wahaunsee. He organized free-state forces and in every way identified himself with the early history of the torritory. As chairman of the Free-State Executive Committee, he located the road from Topeka to Nebraska City, thereby securing a safe route of travel for free-state immigrants. Doctor Root was sent East as agent to obtain arms and other assistance for the free soilers of Kansas and was very successful in his mission. On his return he located at Wyandotte and was there elected a member of the Council. In 1861 he was elected the first lieutenant-governor of the state; served in the Second Kansas as surgeon and was medical director of the Army of the Frontier. At the close of the war he returned to Wyandotte and resumed the practice of his profession, but was appointed minister of Chile in 1870. At the close of his term of office he again located in Wyandotte, of which he was a resident until his...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel D. Lecompte

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Samuel D. Lecompte, first chief justice of the Territory of Kansas and afterward prominent on the bench of Leavenworth County, and a representative in both houses of the Legislature, was born in Dorchester County, Maryland, December 13, 1814. After graduating from Jefferson College, Pennsylvania, he studied law in Maryland and, upon being admitted to the bar, began practice in Carroll County, that state. He had served one term in the Maryland Legislature and become quite prominent politically, when he moved to Baltimore in 1854. In October, 1854, President Pierce appointed Mr. Lecompte chief justice of the Territory of Kansas, which position he held until March 9, 1859. Upon retiring from the bench he located in Leavenworth and opened a law office. At the close of the Civil war he renounced his democratic beliefs and became a republican. Judge Lecompte served four years as probate judge of Leavenworth County; represented the county in the State Legislatures of 1867-68, and on April 15, 1874, was elected chairman of the Republican Congressional Committee of the First District. In 1887 he went to Kansas City to live with his son and died there on April 24,...

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Biography of Charles Snyder

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Charles Snyder is the proprietor of the Juliaetta Hotel, and is practically one of the founders of the town, having secured the establishment of the post-office, and also promoted many of the leading enterprises of the place. His labors have been most effective in its upbuilding, and his name is therefore inseparably connected with its history. Mr. Snyder is of German birth. He first opened his eyes to the light of day on the 8th of November 1827, and is of honorable German ancestry. He was educated in his native land, learned the cabinet-maker’s trade, and in 1850 bade adieu to friends and fatherland, preparatory to trying his fortune in the United States. When he came to this country he was entirely ignorant of the language of the people, but possessed native intelligence, a good knowledge of his trade and was energetic and ambitious, and through the combination of these qualities he has secured a handsome and creditable competence. Landing at New York he thence made his way to Cleveland, Ohio, where he worked two years. He then went to Detroit, Michigan, and accepted a position in the car shops, where he remained three years, and in 1855 he went to Kansas. That state was just opening up to civilization. He located at Wyandotte, just across...

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Biographical Sketch of Henry McGrew

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Henry McGrew, a son of the late Governor James McGrew and his wife Mary (Doggett) McGrew, has spent practically all his life in Kansas City, Kansas, was formerly prominent as a member of the bar of that city, and is still one of the leading business men. He was born at Lancaster, Keokuk County, Iowa, April 18, 1857, the same year that his father came as a pioneer to Wyandotte, Kansas. He grew up at Wyandotte, attended the public schools, and had all the advantages that a young man of ambition would crave as a preparation for a career. Determining upon the vocation of lawyer, he entered the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he was graduated LL. B. with the class of 1879. He engaged in practice at Kansas City, Kansas, and while in active practice he served five years as city attorney of Wyandotte and for two years 1891-92 was county attorney of Wyandotte County. In the meantime he became actively interested in the management of extensive real estate and other properties and business affairs, and since 1904 he has been practically retired from his legal practice. Mr. McGrew has done much to develop some of the best sections of Kansas City, Kansas, for residence and business uses, and is one of the...

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Biography of William Beggs

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now William Beggs, now county clerk of Wyandotte County, and with a long and honorable record of public service, has been a resident of Kansas City, Kansas, since early boyhood and found his work for many years in connection with some of the packing industries of the city. There is hardly a better known citizen of the city or county, and his ability to do things and get things done and his personal integrity have long made him a man of mark. He was born in the northern part of Ireland May 27, 1867, the oldest of seven children of Richard and Mary Ann (Leamon) Beggs. The parents, seeking to better the conditions for themselves and their children, set out in 1872 and came to the United States. At Chicago Richard Beggs secured employment with the Fowler Packing Company, but soon afterward was transferred to Kansas City, Kansas, where he became head of the dry salt pork cellars, responsibilities which be continued to hold until he retired from active work in 1906. He is at the present time making his home with a son in Kansas City, Missouri. His beloved wife died in 1906 at the age of sixty-eight. The seven children are still living: William; James L., new city commissioner of streets and public highways of...

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Biography of Byron Judd, Hon.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Hon. Byron Judd was a pioneer of Wyandotte County. He established his home in the village of Wyandotte in November, 1857, when Kansas was still a territory. He lived in the village, his capacities expanding with the growth of the community, and his personal position and influence rising as Wyandotte County grew and prospered, and at his death on July 27, 1909, it was generally recognized and appreciated that he was one of the men who had left a permanent impress for good upon Kansas City, Kansas, a great city of which his old home village of Wyandotte had in the meantime become an integral part. He was nearly eighty-five years of age at the time of his death. He was born at Otis in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, August 13, 1824, a son of Ardon and Sarah (Hubbard) Judd. Both parents lived out their lives in Massachusetts, and both were members of pioneer New England families. Byron Judd spent his youth in the Berkshire Hills. He tried his muscle in cultivating the rough and stony ground of that section. He attended the common schools, also the academy at Southwick, and completed his education in the Massachusetts State Normal School at Westfield. For a time he was a teacher in Massachusetts. He was about thirty-one years of...

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Biography of Theodore F. Ismert

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Theodore F. Ismert, president of the Ismert-Hincke Milling Company of Kansas City, Kansas, is a director and controlling factor in the great milling industries of the Missouri Valley. He and his family have been prominently identified with flour milling in this and other states of the Middle West for over half a century. The Ismerts are of French lineage. Theodore F. Ismert was born at his father’s home in Lebanon, Illinois, February 10, 1866, the oldest of five children. Only two are now living, his sister being Mrs. Hincke. Their parents were John and Amelia (Berrard) Ismert, both natives of France. It was to take advantage of the glorious opportunities held out in America at the time that John Ismert came to the United States at the age of fifteen. Some of his uncles were then located near Buffalo, New York, and were identified with the milling industry there. John Ismert came over in a sailing vessel. Miss Berrard came about the same time with one of her brothers. They lived in the French settlement around Buffalo. At the age of seventeen in 1858 John Ismert made the long and dangerous journey to California by way of the Isthmus of Panama. He joined actively in the adventurous life of the far West, prospected seven years, had...

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Biography of Henry L. Alden

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Henry L. Alden arrived in the old village of Wyandotte on Thanksgiving Day morning in November, 1867, and from that time until his death November 21, 1913, he continued a resident of Wyandotte and of Kansas City, Kansas. He was one of the most distinguished lawyers Kansas ever had. The many public honors that came to him, almost entirely within the scope of his profession, were a tribute to his power as a lawyer and his integrity of character. He was not yet twenty-one years of age when he came to Kansas. He was born on a farm near Greenwich in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, May 8, 1847, a son of Abel and Evaline (Thompson) Alden. Judge Alden was the direct descendant in the ninth generation from the famous Pilgrim John Alden, and it was the branch of the family originating in Joseph, the second son of John Alden, to which the late Judge Alden belonged. This branch of the Alden family were chiefly farmers in Massachusetts. Abel Alden spent his life on a farm in Hampshire County and he and his wife had eight children. From the public schools at the age of fifteen Henry L. Alden entered Munson Academy at Munson, Massachusetts, and a year later entered Kimball Union Academy at Meriden, New Hampshire, where...

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Biography of Maurice L. Alden

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Maurice L. Alden, a son of the late Judge Henry L. Alden, had since his admission to the bar in 1898 become a prominent member of the Kansas City legal profession, and inherits many of the enviable qualities that distinguished his father. He was born in old Wyandotte, now Kansas City, Kansas, October 10, 1873, was educated in the public schools, graduating from the Kansas City Kansas High School in 1891 and from the Kansas State University in 1895. At the age of twenty-one he became secretary to Congressman O. L. Miller, who represented the Second Congressional District of Kansas in Congress, and two years later was made assistant secretary to United States Senator Lucien Baker from Kansas. It was while he was at Washington, D. C., as secretary to Congressman Miller and assistant secretary to Senator Baker that he attended law school. The sessions of the Columbian University (now George Washington University) were held at night, and so during the day he attended to his duties as secretary and at night attended the law school. He graduated from the law school in 1897. He left Washington in 1898 and entered the law office of Lathrop, Morrow, Fox & Moore, one of the large law firms of Kansas City, Missouri. He was admitted to the bar...

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