Location: Woodstock Vermont

Biography of Frank T. Vaughan

Frank T. Vaughan, one of the younger lawyers of Newport, was born May 4, 1864, in Woodstock, Vt., son of Edwin and Elizabeth L. (Tenney) Vaughan. The father, who graduated at the Albany Law School, New York, followed the legal profession, and at the time of his death was Judge of Probate. Edwin Vaughan commenced his law practice in New York City; but in 1859 he removed to Claremont, N.H., and entered into partnership with Colonel Alexander Gardner. In 1861 he enlisted in the New Hampshire Battalion of the First Rhode Island Volunteer Cavalry, and was afterward transferred to the First New Hampshire Cavalry, with the rank of Captain. He remained in the service throughout the late war, acting at one time as Provost Marshal. Claremont, and was thereafter engaged in his profession until 1869. In that year he was appointed United States Consul to Canada, a post which he efficiently filled for twelve years. Upon his return to Claremont he was made Judge of Probate, and he afterward served as Representative to the State legislature. He was largely interested in educational matters, was liberal in religion, and he was a member in good standing of the A. F. & A. M. He died December 18, 1890. He and his wife had three children. One died in infancy; and Charles Edwin died at the age of twelve years, from...

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Biography of Captain Harry C. Fay

Captain Harry C. Fay, editor-in-chief of the National Eagle, a bright and thoroughly up-to-date newspaper published in Claremont, was born in Richmond, Vt., November 30, 1830, son of Captain Nathan and Polly (Colby) Fay. Stephen Fay, his great-great-grandfather, was an early settler in Bennington, Vt., and was the father of eight children. His son John kept the Catamount Tavern, which during his day became a meeting-place for many great statesmen, who formed a legislative body, and held there meetings known as “Councils of Safety.” He, John, fell in the battle of Bennington. His son, Nathan Fay, served as a Colonel Warner’s command. Nathan, who was a cloth-dresser by trade, removed from Bennington to Richmond, Vt., about the year 1781, and established there a cloth-dressing house, which he carried on successfully for a number of years, leaving a flourishing business at the time of his death, which occurred at the age of seventy-seven. He married a daughter of Colonel Safford, a member of an old and prominent family of Bennington. Captain Nathan Fay, father of the subject of this sketch, continued the business of clothdressing after the death of his father; but, it subsequently becoming less profitable, he turned his attention in part to farming, and at the time of his death was the owner of one thousand acres of land. A member in early life of the Democratic party,...

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Biography of Edward C. Willis

Edward C. Willis, superintendent of the State Orphans Home at Atchison, is a graduate of Dartmouth College and came to kansas nearly forty years ago with the equipment and training of a oultured New Englander. His work in this state had been largely of an educational nature, and he had taught, had been superintendent of schools, and was finally appointed to his present post at Atchison, where he had served with the exception of two years since 1907. Nearly all of Mr. Willis’ ancestors were colonial families of New England. The Willis family came originally from the northern part of England and settled in Massachnsetts as early as 1638. His grandfather, Joseph Willis, was born at Mount Holly, Vermont, in 1779, was a Vermont farmer, served as a soldier in the War of 1812, and died at Bridgewater, Vermont, in 1866. He married Hannah O’Headle, who was of Irish descent. Joseph E. Willis, father of Edward C., was born at Mount Holly, Vermont, in 1815. He grew up in his native locality, was a Vermont farmer and became a prominent citizen of that state. For many terms he served as a selectman at Bridgewater, and was a member of the Vermont Legislature more than twenty years. At the beginning of the Civil war in 1861 he enlisted and became colonel of a Vermont regiment, seeing active service until the...

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Biographical Sketch of Lemuel Thomas

Lemuel Thomas, born in Woodstock, Vt., came to Stowe in 1818, and located at the lower village, where he engaged in farming, in connection with the business of wool-carding and cloth-dressing. After several years, however, he devoted his whole attention to farming, until seventy-nine years of age, when he took up his residence with his son, Weston L., and died in his house at the age of eighty-nine years. Weston L. and Isaac are the only children of Lemuel now...

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Biographical Sketch of Abial H. Slayton

Abial H. Slayton, from Woodstock, Vt., came to Stowe about the year 1821, and located on road 48, where his son, Abial H., now lives. He died here in 1831, aged thirty-five years. Three of his sons, Jerome B., Azro C., and Abial H., are residents of the...

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Biographical Sketch of Joseph Benson

Joseph Benson, born at Middlebury, Mass., September 3, 1783, came to Stowe from Woodstock, Vt., in 1803, and located upon the farm now occupied by his son, Frank. About two years previous to his death, which occurred in 1870, he removed to Stowe village. Mr. Benson was a man of steady and industrious habits, and attained a comfortable competence, and the entire respect of his fellow citizens. He married Miss Eliza Benson, of his native town, who survived him until 1879. Five of their seven children reside in the town, viz.: Orlando J., Elmira A. (Mrs. G. S. Moody), Flotilla V., Mercy C., and Franklin J., while Hope E. (Mrs. F. J. Upton) resides in Iowa, and Adelaide N. (Mrs. H. N. Waite) resides in New York...

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Biographical Sketch of Col. Asahel Raymond

Col. Asahel Raymond was born in Middlebury, Mass., April 7, 1781. His parents moved to Woodstock in the following September, where he resided until September, 1807, when he came to Stowe. Here he immediately purchased a farm, where Noah Scribner now resides, and commenced the manufacture of salts and pearl ashes from the ashes obtained in clearing his land, and also purchased by exchange for dry goods and groceries, of the surrounding settlers. He formed a copartnership with Dea. Asa Raymond, which continued until the death of Dea. Raymond. In 1822 and 1823, they built the grist-mill now owned by Thomas A. Straw, it then being located in the forest. In June, 1817, he purchased the hotel at the Center village, of Nathaniel Butts, and fitted up one of the ells for a store, into which he moved his goods. The remaining part of the building he used for a dwelling. After moving to the village he carried on the mercantile part of the business alone. His pearl ashes were taken to Boston on a heavy wagon, drawn by two yoke of oxen and a pair of horses. The conveyance would return laden with merchandise. The surplus pork was hauled in the same manner to Montreal, and the wheat to Albany, N. Y. Mr. Raymond gave employment to many of the settlers who were in destitute circumstances, thus proving...

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Biographical Sketch of Joseph Bennett

Joseph Bennett was born in Middlebury, Mass., December 19, 1763. He married Susannah Simmons, and soon after his marriage settled in Woodstock, Vt., where he remained until December, 1810, when he came to this town and located upon the farm where Orlando F. Gerry, whose wife is a granddaughter of Joseph, now resides. Here, in a small log cabin they resided for ten years, when a more pretentious dwelling took its place, in which Mr. Bennett died, in 1825, aged sixty-two years. Mrs. Bennett survived his death until July, 1855, aged eighty-five years. Only one of their six children is now living, Joseph H. Bennett, aged eighty-four years, who resides with his niece, Mrs....

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Mary Slayton Luce

Mrs. Mary Slayton Luce, wife of Chester Luce, was born in Woodstock, Vt., April 18, 1787. Her father, Samuel Slayton, was a farmer in good circumstances, though possessing but a limited education, an honest, frugal, and kindly man. Her mother, Hannah, whose maiden name was Stowe, was in every respect a superior woman. Mrs. Luce, in her youth improved every educational advantage the rural district in which she resided could afford. As she grew older she acquired a passionate fondness for reading, especially of poetry and romance. At a more mature age she engaged in school teaching, which vocation she followed until her marriage with Chester Luce, March 17, 1818, when they removed to this town, where Mrs. Luce breathed her last, April 20,...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel Bryant

Samuel Bryant, from Woodstock, Vt., came to Emore in 1824, and settled upon the farm owned by Benjamin Davis, on road 19. Here he resided for a few years, then removed to Morristown, where he cleared up the farm now the property of Alfred Dodge. In 1845, he returned to Elmore, remained here five years, then removed to Franklin county, N. Y., where he died, in April, 1882, aged about ninety-two years. His wife died five days later, aged over ninety-three years. Of their family of six children, three are now living, one, Joseph W., in this town. He was born, March 10, 1816, married Laura M. C. Camp, daughter of Dr. Joel Camp, and has three children, two sons and one daughter. Joseph W. has held most of the town offices, and in connection with his farming enterprises, has practiced law for forty...

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Biographical Sketch of James Cobb

James Cobb, born in Woodstock, Vt., came to Stowe when a boy, where he learned the carpenter and joiner trade, and finally settled on road 17. He died May 8, 1871, aged fifty-five years. His widow,, and son Enos B., yet reside...

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Biography of Winslow P. Powers

Deceased. – While it is the province of our volume to give mention of the leading citizens of Wallowa county, it also comes within the purview of the work to grant to such as the noble and esteemed citizen, whose name appears above, a memoir, and it is with especial delight that we are privileged to do so at this time, since he was one of the builders of the county, and one who held in becoming manner the position of leader for many years, being eminently fitted for that capacity, both by marked capabilities, great energy and force of character, untiring activity, devotion to his country, and stanch integrity, coupled with sound principles and a broad public view. The birth of Mr. Powers occurred in Woodstock, Vermont, on April 8, 1821, being the son of James and Anna (Phelps) Powers, who were also natives of the Green Mountain state. In 1826 the parents came to Illinois, settling on a farm, where the mother died in 1835. The father continued on the farm in Hancock County till 1854 and then while on a journey to the west, fell a hapless victim to the awful fiends who perpetrated the Mountain Meadow massacre in 1854. Our subject had come to the Willamette valley in 1847, and worked at the carpenter trade on some of the first buildings in Portland, continuing there...

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