Location: Winnebago County IL

John Wesley Somers

John Wesley Somers, one of Ida Grove’s oldest and distinguished residents, died Saturday morning, August 2, 1919, at the age of 84 years, 8 months, and 15 days. The funeral was held at the late home Monday, in charge of Rev. John T. Pierce. The interment was at the Ida Grove Cemetery. The pall bearers were Charles S. Macomber, W. J. Scott, James E. Easton, B. S. Noble, A. Sykes, and Card Kiner. Mr. Somers was born at Rockford, Surrey County, North Carolina, on November 17, 1834. While still in youth, he moved to Rockford, Illinois, where he met Sarah J. Fitzgerald, and on November 28, 1858, in that city, the ceremony was solemnized by the Rev. Wm. Munhall. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted in 1861, and was in the active army service throughout the entire period of the war, three years and 11 months. He was mustered out as First Lieutenant Quartermaster, 76th Illinois Volunteers, on May 15, 1865. He studied pharmacy in Illinois and, upon his return from the army, conducted that business. For 21 years after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Somers lived in Urbana. Then in September, 1879, they moved to Onawa, Ia., and three years later, in June, 1882, they came to Ida Grove, Ia. Here he opened his business as a druggist and pharmacist, a business which has continued...

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Biography of Thomas Page

For upwards of half a century, Thomas Page has been one of the prominent commercial figures in Kansas. With possibly one exception, he is the oldest miller in the state, and for years has been a factor in the milling and grain interests and as much as any other individual has contributed to make Topeka a center for the manufacture of flour. A native of Scotland, he was born in the little manufacturing hamlet of Dunshalt in Fifeshire, September 3, 1843. With a practical schooling he began an apprenticeship in the milling business. For some time he was employed in a mill on the River Clyde, where he daily witnessed the arrival and departure of some of the great ocean vessels which brought to him all the sense of mystery and the messages of far off lands which the sight of them inspires. No doubt it was the vessels plying between America and Great Britain that gave him his first definite idea of making the United States his future home. It was in 1866, when he was twenty-three years of age, that he took passage on one of these vessels for America. Not long after his arrival he found employment at his trade in Albany, New York. Then in 1869 he started westward, for a short time worked in Peoria and for a longer time at Rockford, Illinois. At...

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Biography of Ralph Ray Price

Ralph Ray Price, professor of History and Civics in the Kansas State Agricultural College at manhattan, had a more than professional interest in the history of Kansas, since he is a native of the state and his people were factors in the pioneer life of the territory. Professor Price is of Scotch-Irish descent and one of his ancestors fought for American independenes in the Battle of Bunker Hill. He was born on a farm in Willow Springs Township of Douglas County, Kansas, ten miles south of Lawrence on March 6, 1872. For several years he had been out of the state as a student or teacher, but otherwise his entire career had been identified with Kansas. His father Francis Marion Price was born September 18, 1846, in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, a son of William C. and Hannah J. Price. When he was thirteen years of age he came to Kansas with his father in 1859. They located in Willow Springs Township of Douglas County and F. M. Price made that his home almost constantly until his death on August 22, 1913. He was one of the boy soldiers of the Union army. He enlisted September 5, 1862, a few days before his sixteenth birthday, in Company B, Twelfth Regiment, Kansas Volunteer Infantry. From that time he was in continuous service until honorably discharged May 24, 1865. On September 8,...

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Biography of De Witt C. Tyler, M. D.

De Witt C. Tyler, M. D. Though he is now retiring from the work which had engaged his attention for so many years Doctor Tyler is properly credited with being the oldest physician and surgeon of Clifton, where he began practice thirty-six years ago. By intense devotion to his work Doctor Tyler long enjoyed a splendid practice in Clay and Washington counties, and though much of his service had gone unremunerated he had exercised fine business ability and owned a large amount of property in this section of the state. Doctor Tyler was born at Roscoe, Illinois, March 13, 1850, and largely educated himself by earning the means necessary for his higher education. He is of old American and New England stock. His great-grand-father and also his grandfather, Asa Tyler, were natives of Vermont. Asa was born in that colony in 1777, served with credit in the War of 1812 and became a pioneer farmer in Illinois. He died at Monroe in Ogle County, Illinois, in 1873. He married Fannie Tupper, who also died at Monroe. Freeman Tyler, father of Doctor Tyler, was born in New York State in 1819. In 1832, when he was thirteen years of age, his parents removed to Ohio, locating east of Cleveland, where he grew up and married. He was a cooper by trade, and in 1840 went to Belvidere, Illinois, where he...

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Biography of William Taylor

For twenty-eight years William Taylor has resided in Latah County, and is therefore one of the honored pioneer farmers of the locality. He has not only witnessed the entire growth and development of this section of the state, but has ever borne his part in the work of progress, and his name should be enduringly inscribed on the pages of its history. A native of the Emerald Isle, he was born in county Armagh, Ireland, April 15, 1820, his parents being Joseph and Elizabeth (Rankin) Taylor. In 1840 the father came to America, bringing with him his wife and seven children. They made the voyage on the sailing vessel Fairfield, and were five weeks on the passage. They took up their residence on Bonus prairie, Boone county, Illinois, near where the city of Belvidere now stands, the father purchasing forty acres of land, from which he developed a fine farm. The city of Chicago was then but a little muddy village and the country was largely unimproved. Both he and his wife were members of the Presbyterian Church, were highly respected people, and each lived to the age of seventy-three rears. William Taylor, their eldest child, was educated in his native land, and learned the mason’s trade, serving a five years’ apprenticeship. After becoming a resident of Illinois he followed that pursuit, doing much of the work in his...

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Biography of Thomas E. Sheard

Thomas E. Sheard. There are no business men who, outside the medical and dental professions, come into such close, personal contact with their fellows as do barbers, and often their delicate ministrations are just as comforting and beneficial. A long course of careful training is necessary to bring about deftness of hand and quickness of eye, and when these are accompanied by a genial presence and a personal interest, a barber finds himself popular and prosperous. For thirty-two years Thomas E. Sheard had conducted his barber establishment in the same block on Kansas Avenue, Topeka, and during this time his visitors and customers have included many of the leading men of the country and particularly distinguished characters of western life. Thomas E. Sheard was born in Winnebago County, Illinois, June 17, 1854. His parents were William and Emma (Morrill) Sheard, natives of Nottingham, England, where they were married in 1845. William Sheard came first to America in 1850, accompanied by his wife, and settled at Elgin, Illinois, shortly afterward removing to Pecatonica in Winnebago County, Illinois. From there the family returned to England in 1856 and continued to live there for six years and then came back to the United States. For a few years Mr. Sheard resided at Vineland, New Jersey, and in 1869 removed to Rochester, New York, and from that city, eight years later, to Wayne...

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Biography of Aaron B. Perine

Aaron B. Perine. One of the few remaining of the old pioneers of Kansas. Aaron B. Perine, of Topeka, came to this state sixty-three years ago, and has been a permanent resident of Kansas since 1854, except for the two years he was out of the state. In the early days he was engaged in work among the Indians for the Government, later turned his attention to the blacksmithing trade, and for many years now has been at the head of the successful Perine Plow Works. He was born at Dansville, Livingston County, New York, May 4, 1836, and is a son of John W. and Mariett (Ingalls) Perine. Daniel Perrin (as the name was then spelled) was one of the Huguenots who fled from persecution from France, finally seeking refuge in America. On shipboard he met Maria Thorel, who later became his wife, and Aaron B. Perine is a direct descendant of these immigrants. His grandfather, William Perine, served eight years under Gen. George Washington in the Revolutionary war and attained the rank of captain. His father, John W. Perine, was a tanner by trade (then called the tan currier trade), and for the most part he and his wife passed their lives in Livingston County, New York. Aaron B. Perine passed his boyhood and youth in several counties of New York and received but a limited education...

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Biographical Sketch of Bernard T. Duffey

Duffey, Bernard T.; insurance; born, Rockford, Ill., July 5, 1869; educated, public schools of Rockford; married, Beloit, Wis., August 15, 1892, Lillian Knapp; married, Chicago, Ill., June 15, 1910, Bertha Agnes Nye; children, Bernard P., Jr., John Nye; engaged in fire insurance with Rockford Insurance Co., Rockford, Ill., 1887, continuing with that company until 1900; then with Royal Insurance Co., Ltd., of Liverpool, England; now state agent in Ohio for that company; member Cleveland Athletic...

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Biographical Sketch of Frederick D. Kellogg

Kellogg, Frederick D.; The Ohio Quarries Co.; born, Rockford, Ill., Sept. 3, 1880; son of George F. and Anna M. Doubler Kellogg; educated, Grade and High School, Rockford, Ill., High School, Chicago, and Chicago College of Law; married, Winnebago, Ill., May 16, 1902, Florence M. Clark; one daughter, Virginia; seven years banking business in Chicago; moved to Cleveland in 1909, and became connected with The Ohio Quarries Co.; in 1910, was elected sec’y and treas. of the Company; sec’y and asst. treas. Lorain & Southern R. R. Co.; pies. and treas. Quarries Equipment Co.; member Woodward Lodge, Masons, Oakwood Lodge, Royal League, Chicago; member Euclid Club. Recreation:...

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Warnock, Samuel B. – Obituary

Samuel B. Warnock, pioneer of Day Ridge, died Friday, November 11, 1927, at La Grande, where he had gone a few days before for treatment for Bright’s disease. He had been in poor health for several months and with his wife had spent the summer and fall at the warm springs on Joseph Creek. About three weeks ago they went to the home of their daughter, Mrs. Kenneth Johnson, on Day Ridge. Mr. Warnock was taken worse and went to la Grande, where his wife and Mrs. Johnson were summoned last Wednesday. The body was brought to Enterprise Saturday by C.L. Booth and was taken to Flora Sunday in the Methodist church. Prof. D.W. Moore of flora delivered the sermon in the presence of a large gathering of friends. Mr. and Mrs. George Clausen of Day Ridge came to Enterprise Friday and remained with the family, going to Flora with them Sunday. Mrs. George Emmons and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Young and son of Wallowa went to Flora to attend the funeral. Mr. Warnock was born January 31, 1863, at Rockford, Ill. When he was 3 years old the family moved to Nebraska where they lived a short time, moving thence to Kansas. From that state, when he was 26 years old, he came to Oregon, stopping first in the Grand Ronde valley for a year. In 1889 he...

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Biography of Edwin Ruthven Heath

Edwin Ruthven Heath, a prominent physician and specialist of Kansas City, Kansas, had a record among Kansas citizens that is unique. As a boy he knew the terrors, excitements and thrilling incidents of life in California following the discovery of gold in ’49. As a traveler both in North and South America he had contributed a part of the world’s knowledge of geography, peoples and science. He spent twelve years in South America, practiced medicine in remote construction camps and among wild and semi-barbarous tribes, and he helped build some of the pioneer railways of that continent. To as great a degree as it could be said of any one, Dr. Heath had lived the strenuous life. He had been a resident of Kansas since 1881, and here had given his chief attention to the practice of medicine. Dr. Heath was born at Janesville, Wisconsin, July 13, 1839. He is the only survivor of three children whose parents were James and Madelia McLean (Boyce) Heath. Both parents came from Vermont, and his father, James, was the youngest of nineteen children. Dr. Heath’s brother, Ivon D., was a successful farmer, was a friend of Dr. Root, surgeon of the Kansas Seventh Regiment in the Union Army, and Ivon was made hospital steward under Colonel Cloud and served in that capacity through the war. In 1848, during the historic gold rush...

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Biography of Alonzo J. Tullock

Alonzo J. Tullock. The profession of civil engineering is one which offers great opportunities to those equipped by nature and study for this line of work. It demands, however, perhaps a more thorough technical knowledge of more subjects than almost any other vocation in which man may engage, but its rewards are commensurate with its difficulties and on the pages of history the names of civil engineers who have seemingly accomplished the impossible appear with those of other benefactors of the human race. The great western country, without these able, trained, accurate and daring men would today have been yet sleeping, instead of offering homes and untold riches to the world at large. Among the men of Kansas who have represented this honored and difficult calling was the late Alonzo J. Tullock, whose work still lives, although more than a decade of years have passed since its author’s death. Mr. Tullock was a native of Winnebago County, Illinois, born on a farm near Rockford, March 21, 1854. His parents, George and Mary (Milne) Tullock, the former a native of Scotland and the latter of England and of French ancestry, were farming people and among the pioneer settlers of that part of the Prairie State. On one occasion, when the father drove to the markets at Chicago, before the days of the railroads, he returned from his long and tedious...

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Biography of James Cyrus Preston, M. D.

James Cyrus Preston, M. D. One of the foremost men of Buffalo, Kansas, is Dr. James Cyrus Preston, the pioneer physician, and for many years the leader in medical thought in Wilson County, and the wise adviser and stable supporter of public enterprises which have assisted greatly in the town’s development. Doctor Preston came first to Buffalo after some years of medical experience in Arizona, and thus was well prepared for the hardships and handicaps that attended his early days here, in 1889, and with the exception of an interim of five years, had been a continuous resident and a busy physician and surgeon. He was born in Fulton County, Illinois, March 13, 1863. His parents were William H. and Adaline (Thomas) Preston. The early Prestons were of English birth and descent and were Colonial settlers in New England. The grandfather of Doctor Preston was Richard Preston, who was born in Vermont, in 1805, and died in Howard County, Iowa, in 1882. In 1845 he removed with his family to Winnebago County, Illinois, seeking work as a carpenter and cabinetmaker, in which he was skilled. It is said of him that he had great facility with the drum and his services were often in demand when militia was under training. His wife, Hannah Gilmore, was born in New England in 1807, and died in Iowa in 1867. William H....

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Leonard Hitchcock Todd of Rockford IL

Leonard Hitchcock Todd7, (Marvin6, Daniel5, Daniel4, Daniel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Aug. 12, 1818, in Lowville, N. Y., died Oct. 31, 1861, in Rockford, Ill., married first, Oct. 1, 1840, Betsey A. Hunt, who died June 28, 1841. He married second, March 9, 1846, Laura A. Matheson, who died June 26, 1848. Married third, June 18, 1849, Augusta A. Ruger, who married, second, Gilbert Woodruff, of Rockford, Ill. Children: 1554. Lena M., b. March 1851, unmarried, lives in Rockford, Ill. 1555. Frances Abbie, b. Oct. 10, 1855, unmarried, lives in Rockford, Ill. 1556. Charles S., b. Oct. 1852, d. July 6, 1861, of Diphtheria. 1557. Caroline, b. in Rockford, Ill., d....

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Lorenzo D. Todd of Elyria OH

Lorenzo D. Todd7, (Marvin6, Daniel5, Daniel4, Daniel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born July 29, 1820, in Lowville, N. Y., died April 8, 1895, in Elyria, Ohio, where he was buried, married, Nov. 9, 1845, in Watertown, N. Y., by Rev. Isaac Brayton, Harriet S. daughter of David W. Mills, who was born Sept. 13, 1826, in Watertown, N. Y., died May 25, 1900, in Elyria, Ohio, where she too was buried. Mr. Todd was a shoemaker by trade and worked at the business most of the time, though farming at intervals. He and family moved to Elyria, Ohio, about 1850, and lived there most of the time thereafter, execpting only when he went to Rockford, Ill., where he engaged in the shoe business with his brother, Leonard H. Todd. Five years before his death he contracted the disease called Shingles, leaving him with a terrible pain in his side, from which he suffered the remainder of his days. Children: *1558. Marvin Mills, b. April 8, 1847. *1559. Harriet Julia, b. Nov. 9, 1848. 1560. Alice Caroline, b. July 10, 1854, d. June 28, 1861, of...

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