Location: Williams County OH

Biography of James Boyd Hitt

James Boyd Hitt, who had been actively identified with school work nearly twenty years, is now superintendent of the city schools of Everest, Brown County. Mr. Hitt did his first work as an educator in his native State of Ohio and had been connected with kansas schools for about ten years. His forefathers in the Hitt family were of Scotch-Irish ancestry and were early settlers in Virginia. His grandfather, Garrett T. Hitt, was born in Culpeper County, Virginia. He came North and located in Ohio, at first in Tuscarawas County and later in Williams County. He followed farming, and after a long and prosperous career died at Bryan, Ohio, in 1890. He married Angelina Gladstone, also a native of Virginia. James Boyd Hitt was born at Bryan, Ohio, May 25, 1880. His father, James A. Hitt, was born in Pulaski, Ohio, in 1839, grew up at Pulaski, was married near Bryan, and was a teacher, farmer and operator of saw mills and threshing machines. Altogether he taught thirty-five winter terms of school in Ohio and conducted his milling enterprise during the summer seasons. He afterwards took up farming and in 1905 removed to Jackson, Michigan, where he died in 1908. In the various communities of his residence he always took an active part in the Christian Church and served as deacon and elder. Politically he was a democrat and at...

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Biography of Francis E. Ensign

Holding marked prestige among the prominent members of the Idaho bar is Francis Edward Ensign, who is now engaged in the practice of the legal profession in Hailey. There are few-men whose lives are crowned with the honor and respect which is uniformly accorded him; but through forty-five years” connection with the west his has been an unblemished career. With him success in life has been reached by sterling qualities of mind and a heart true to every manly principle. In his varied business interests his reputation has been unassailable and in offices of public trust he has displayed a loyalty that classed him among the valued citizens of the commonwealth. He has nearly reached the seventieth milestone that marks earth’s pilgrimage, but is still concerned with the active affairs of life, and in the courts of his district displays a strong mentality undimmed by time and a power of argument that wins him many notable forensic victories. A native of Ohio, Mr. Ensign was born in Painesville, March 4, 1829, and is descended from English ancestors who came from the “merrie isle” to the New World, locating in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1630, only two years after the landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth Rock. A little later the Ensigns became pioneer settlers of Hartford, Connecticut. The paternal grandfather of our subject was one of the first settlers of...

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Biography of J. Newton Rogers, M. D.

J. Newton Rogers, M. D. While too much credit can never be given the pioneers as a class, the work of the physician in a new and frontier country is deserving of special consideration. Not even the minister of the Gospel did so much to relieve affliction and distress as the hard working, patient and skillful doctor who rode his rounds, often for many miles between calls, and disregarded weather and every hardship in order to be of service to those who needed him. Of pioneer, physicians there was perhaps no finer type than the late J. Newton Bogers, who came to Marion, Kansas, in 1865, when that was a village of some few years’ growth and in the same year that Marion County was organized. His was truly a life of service and devotion to humanity. Doctor Rogers was born October 28, 1841, on a farm in Williams County, Ohio, a son of Adolphus and Cornelia (Whaley) Rogers, his father a native of Massachusetts and his mother of New York. Though Doctor Rogers lived an arduous life, he lived the full span allotted by the psalmist and died at Marion, Kansas, in peace and follness of honor and esteem August 19, 1912, aged seventy-one. He grew up on his father’s farm, attended country schools, also an academy at Hillsdale, Michigan, and in order to secure the means required...

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Biographical Sketch of C. G. Beckwith

Beckwith, C. G.; electrical engineer; born, Dowagiac, Mich., Apr. 19, 1870; son of Edwin Walter and Clara L. Sullivan Beckwith; educated, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.; married, Cassapolis, Mich., Feb. 19, 1895, Belle M. Norton; adopted son, Raymon N. Ellis; operating and electrical foreman, 1888-1891; supt. of construction of lighting plants in various parts of Michigan, Indiana and Illinois, 1893-1895; supt. electrical engineering, Montpelier, O., Municipal Plant, 1895-1900; supt. and electrical engineer, Collinwood, O., Municipal Plant, 1900-1910; supt. and electrical engineer City of Cleveland Municipal Plant, 1910, to the present time; member American Institute Electrical Engineers, Cleveland Engineering Society, Electrical League of Cleveland; member F. & A. M. and I. O. 0....

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Biographical Sketch of John H. Hertner

Hertner, John H.; mechanical engineer; born, Jan. 14, 1877, Williams county, O.; educated, M. E., Ohio State University, 1899; married, Nov. 20, 1908, Erma King, Cleveland; organized Hertner Electric Co., 1901; Hertner Electric & Mfg. Co.; organized 1906, absorbed by reorganized Rauch & Lang Co., 1907; director and mechanical engineer, Rauch & Lang Co.; member Chamber of Commerce, Society of Automobile Engineers, American Institute of Electrical...

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Biography of Samuel C. Evans

Samuel C. Evans, one of the most prominent men of Riverside, and who has spent over fifteen years of an active business life in conducting some of the largest business enterprises in the colony, one of which is the Riverside Land and Irrigation Company, came to Riverside in 1874 and purchased a half interest in nearly 10,000 acres of land, known as the Hartshorn tract; the land is now known as the Arlington part of Riverside and Arlington Heights. Captain W. T. Sayward, of San Francisco, was the owner of the other half. These gentlemen in the same year commenced the construction of what is known as the lower canal, for the irrigation of their lands lying in the valley, and also the Temescal or Tin Company’s tract, which they had purchased, after spending large sums of money and meeting a strong opposition from the Southern California Colony Association, whose lands occupied the valley north of theirs. In April 1875, the Riverside Land and Irrigation Company was organized. Mr. Evans was the prime mover in this enterprise, and in July 1876, was elected president of the company, a position he has retained since that date. The company under his management purchased the lands and water right of the Southern California Colony Association, including the water right of Warm creek and the entire canal system. This gave Mr. Evans the...

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