Location: Whitman County WA

Broyles, Virginia D. – Obituary

Formerly of La Grande 1914-2007 Virginia Dorothy Broyles, 92, of Hermiston and formerly of La Grande, died March 9 at her home. A celebration of life is planned for 11 a.m. Thursday at Loveland Funeral Chapel, 1508 Fourth St., La Grande. Viewing will be available from 8 to 10 a.m. prior to the service. Mrs. Broyles was born July 23, 1914, to James A. and Dorothy Ellen (Standard) Cunningham in Albion, Wash. She was raised in Albion, Hooper and Spokane, graduating in the first senior class of John Rogers High School in Hillyard in 1933. During her high school years, she was a mainstay for her parents in the family business, the cafe Cunningham’s Lunch in Spokane. Virginia married Chester W. Broyles April 24, 1940, in Couer d’Alene, Idaho. In 1941, the couple moved to La Grande, where Chet hired out as a conductor for the Union Pacific Railroad. Mrs. Broyles was a devoted home-maker and mother to their four children. After Chet’s retirement in 1979, they began making toys and traveling to craft fairs, a hobby that gave them many hours of enjoyment. Mrs. Broyles was also an avid seamstress, supplying her family with many beautiful articles of clothing, quilts and dolls. One special project was her daughter’s wedding dress, which she appliquéd and beaded by hand. Mrs. Broyles was active in Eastern Star and Daughters of the...

Read More

Lee, Nancy Ann Pointer – Obituary

Lee–In Stockton, September 7, 1932, Mrs. Nancy Ann Lee, widow of the late Jay Right Lee, mother of Sarah Anna Thomas of Walla Walla, Wash., Rosalie Shinkosky of Stockton, Ethel Delano of Hooper, Wash., Addie Thomas of Bremerton, Wash., Goldie Nickerson of Stockton, Jessie Day of Sacramento, Manuel Lee of Colfax, Wash., Clarence Lee of Fairfield, Wash., Jay Right Lee, Stockton; sister of William Pointer of Los Angeles, Sarah James of Dayton, Wash., Ossie Pointer of Spokane, Wash.; a native of Walla Walla, Wash., aged 65 years, 8 months, and 29 days. Friends are invited to attend the funeral services this evening (Thursday, Sept. 8), 8 o’clock, at the chapel of B. C. Wallace, 520 North Sutter Street. Remains will be shipped tomorrow evening, Friday, Sept. 9, on the 7:50 o’clock Southern Pacific train to Colfax, Wash. Interment in Colfax Cemetery. Stockton Daily Evening Record, September 8, 1932 Contributed by: Shelli...

Read More

Hart, Charles Leroy – Obituary

Charles L. Hart, 77, of 6810 South J St., a former McChord Air Force Base employee, died Friday [February 29, 1980]. Born in Colfax, Mr. Hart had resided in Tacoma since 1932. He had been a boiler plant operator at McChord and had been employed at Weyerhaeuser Co. Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Steve (Michelle) Hull of Gig Harbor; two sons, Duane L. of Grey Eagle, Calif., and James A. of Bend, Ore., a brother, Ira of Santa Rosa, Calif.; five grandsons and five granddaughters. Mountain View Funeral Home is in charge. Tacoma News Tribune, March 1, 1980 Contributed by: Shelli...

Read More

Pointer, William Mack – Obituary

William M. Pointer, 68, of 3552 SE 65th Avenue, died at his home Thursday following a lengthy illness. Funeral services will be held Friday at 8 PM in the Bruning & Lundberg Chapel, 1521 SW Salmon Street. The body will be forwarded to Colfax, Wash., where the Elks Lodge will conduct burial services Sunday. Mr. Pointer was born in Walla Walla, Wash. He came to Oregon from Colfax in 1914 and worked for sometime as a highway engineer, having been associated with the construction of Columbia River Highway. Surviving relatives include his widow, Calanthe; a son, Robert W. Pointer, 7707 SW Canyon Road, owner of the Pointer Willamette Company, 238 NE Oregon Street, two brothers, Oce and Ed and a half brother Charles Hart, all of Spokane, Wash. Mr. Pointer was a member of The Dalles Chapter of the Elks Lodge. Oregonian, September 9, 1946 Contributed by: Shelli...

Read More

Cooke, Henry Daniel – Obituary

Henry Daniel Cooke, 69, descendant of two pioneer families of this area, died at his home in Fairview district at about 1 a.m. today [July 2, 1951]. He had lived in Kittitas valley most of his life and farmed at the present Cooke place in the Farview district for the past 16 years. He was a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. E. [Edward] Ward Cooke. His grandparents were the pioneers, Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Cooke and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wheeler. Henry Cooke was born here December 4, 1881. In the fall of 1887, his parents built a roadhouse on Colockum Pass, six miles from the old Cooke ranch. There they lived until 1892, when they sold the station to Mr. and Mrs. George Wheeler in the spring. The Cooke family then moved to Wenatchee, where they spent the summer; in the fall moving to Elberton. They lived at Elberton two years. From Elberton, the family moved by wagon to Pendleton, Ore., working harvests there and at Helix, Ore. They lived at Grant’s Pass, Ore., for awhile and resided four years, until 1897, at Coburg, Ore. Then, driving to Portland, Ore., the Cooke family went by boat up the Columbia river to The Dalles, Ore., crossed into Washington and traveled an old freight road to Yakima. The family returned here from Yakima by the West Side...

Read More

Curtis, Albert L. – Obituary

Funeral services were held last week at Colfax for Albert LeRoy Curtis, 65, of Thornton, Wn., son of Lyman and Martha Curtis, pioneers of Ellensburg, and a nephew of the late Mrs. Rose Carver and James Curtis. Burial was at St. John. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Catherine Curtis; four daughters, Mrs. Grace Gibb of Spokane, Mrs. G. W. Bateman of Boise, Mrs. Alice Keith of Moscow and June Curtis of Spokane; three sons, Mark and Lynn of St. John, and James of Thornton; a brother, B. A. Curtis of Steptoe; and five sisters, Mrs. Inis Good of Thornton, Mrs. Lily Fox of Colfax, Mrs. Iva Witter, and Mrs. Beulah McBride of Spokane and Mrs. Lula Chestnut of St. John. Contributed by: Shelli...

Read More

Treadwell, Margaret Steward Schnebly – Obituary

Margaret Schnebly Treadwell, 78, of Ellensburg, died Thursday [June 22, 1989] at Kittitas Valley Community Hospital following a brief illness. Born in Yakima on June 29, 1910, she attended Yakima schools and Washington State University, where she was a member of Pi Beta Phi Sorority, Spurs, Mortar Board, Theta Sigma Phi and Phi Kappa Phi scholastic honoraries and Who’s Who in American College and Universities. Following graduation in the early 30s from WSU, she worked in Pullman before coming to Ellensburg. She was employed for many years at Central Washington University as secretary to Dr. E. E. Samuelson, Dean of Students. She later served as secretary to the Kittitas County commissioners and was also employed by the City of Ellensburg as secretary to the city manager. Mrs. Treadwell actively supported many organizations. She was a member of the First Presbyterian Church, Janet Howe Hospital Guild, Washington State Republicans, Arvida Club and the Ellensburg Golf and Country Club. In the past she served on the lay committee for the Ellensburg School District, was a member of the YMCA Board, and was a corresponding reporter for the Yakima Herald. She was an active member for more than 50 years of Pi Beta Phi Alumni, serving as a province officer in the 1960s. She was chosen outstanding mother at WSU in May of 1963. She and Robert D. Schnebly were married in...

Read More

Killingsworth, Dale B. – Obituary

Dale B. Killingsworth, 51, of Madras, died Jan. 5, 2005, as the result of a car accident on Highway 97. His memorial service will be from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 21, 2005, at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds in Madras. He was born on Dec. 31, 1953, at Colfax, Wash., to Kenneth and Margorie Beckley Killingsworth. He married his wife, Mickey, on June 26, 1976, at Halfway. Dale attended grade school at Benge, Wash. He attended junior high at Corvallis and was a graduate of Wheeler High School. He went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in agriculture engineering and technology from Oregon State University at Corvallis. He and his wife moved to Madras in 1978 from the Tri-Cities. He was employed by Keith Manufacturing as a sawyer and welder. He was a member of the Jefferson County Farm Bureau as well as the Jefferson County Livestock Association. He had been a Jefferson County 4-H leader for 27 years. Survivors include his wife, Mickey of Madras; his mother, Margorie Killingsworth of Washington; brother and sister-in-law, Jim and Carol Killingsworth of Spokane, Wash.; sisters and their husbands, Shirley and John McLean of Coulee City, Wash., Carol and Rick Killingsworth of Fall City, Wash., and Jeannie and Dan Gullett of Prineville; brothers-in-law, Andrew Greener of Halfway and Jack Greener of Fort Worth, Texas; mother-in-law, E.J. Greener of Halfway; nieces...

Read More

Conquest of the Coeur d’Alene, Spokane and Palouse

The expeditions of Colonels Steptoe and Wright into the country of the Coeur d’Alenes, Spokanes and Palouses were made without the blare of notoriety; they were not heralded by the press in startling headlines; nor were the minutiae of accompanying details flashed momentarily over convenient wires to an expectant nation. In obedience to orders laboriously conveyed to them, the commanders of these expeditions went forward to their duty.

Read More

Whitman County, Washington Cemetery Records

Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following Cemeteries (hosted At Whitman County, Washington Tombstone Transcription Project) Albion (Guy) Cemetery , Albion Colton City Cemetery , Colton Evergreen (IOOF) Cemetery , Rosalia Ewartsville Cemetery Farr Cemetery Goldenrod Cemetery Surnames A – L Surnames M – Z   Holy Rosary (Rosalia Catholic) Cemetery Pitt Cemetery , Kamiak Butte St. Gall’s Catholic Cemetery , Colton Silver Creek Cemetery , Farmington Following Cemeteries (hosted at Interment) Colyar Cemetery Farr Cemetery Goldenrod Cemetery Gresham Cemetery Holy Rosary Cemetery Lone Pine Cemetery Old German Methodist Cemetery Pine City Cemetery Pullman I.O.O.F. Cemetery Riggs Cemetery Sacred Heart Catholic Cemetery Sheahan (Old Thornton) Cemetery Thornton Cemetery...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Thomas Baker

THOMAS BAKER. – Mr. Baker was born in Bullitt county, Kentucky, in 1832, being the son of George C. and Elizabeth Miller Baker. When he was eighteen months old his parents moved to Hancock county, Illinois. He remained in that country until the spring of 1852, being employed on his father’s farm. In the spring of this year, he started with his older brother across the plains to California, and arrived in the Golden State in August, 1852. For ten years he was actively engaged in mining, and was among the number who made the stampede to the Florence mines of Idaho. For one season he dug gold there, and for the succeeding two years in the Boise basin. Changing his business to that of packing from Umatilla Landing to the mines in Idaho, and afterwards on the route from Lewiston, he spent six years to good profit. Coming to the more civilized portions of our state, he selected a home at Waitsburg, and for three years was engaged in the livery business. Subsequently he took the mail contract from Walla Walla to Pen d’Oreille Lake, a distance of 175 miles. His means of locomotion were ponies exclusively. The following year he leased the old Brown ferry on Snake river, and conducted this business until 1875, when he purchased an interest in the livery business of C.B. King, of...

Read More

Biography of Sidney S. Benton

SIDNEY S. BENTON. – This pioneer of Illinois, California and Washington is one of those facile, multiplex characters that give to our Western life its buoyancy. He was born in the first-named State in 1838, while Chicago was yet in her swamps, and his father was at that city in 1831, when it was a mere Indian trading post, and also at Galena, the home of the Grants, in 1832. His father came out to California with ox-teams amid Indians, and over the usual sage-brush plains, and the iron-stone rocks in 1849. He mined on Feather river in Yuba county, and in 1852 went to Siskiyou county, where he followed mining and merchandising. Sidney arrived in 1856 via Panama at Yreka, and mined near that city and in Scott’s valley until 1861. In that year he went to Nevada, working on the Comstock; for six years he was underground foreman of the Savage mine, making money and losing it. In Siskiyou county and Surprise valley, and at Dixon in Solano county, California, he engaged again in business. At the latter place, in 1863, he met an old acquaintance from Wisconsin, Miss Mattie E. Bowmer. She and her brother had come the year before from the East in the company which had been attacked on the Upper Snake river by Indians, who killed twenty-eight of the party. Some fifteen years...

Read More

Biography of James S. Davis

JAMES S. DAVIS – Mr. Davis is one of the most interesting and progressive men of our country. The tragic events of Steptoe’s expedition in 1858 are described in the body of this work, and need no repetition here. One of the most conspicuous landmarks in the region traversed by that ill-fated troop is the spire-like pinnacle of basalt which has ever since received the name of Steptoe. It lies in the midst of one of the richest and most productive farming regions in the world, the far-famed Palouse country. Long a solitude, it has lately been occupied by a keen and public-spirited citizen, known far and near as “Cash-up” Davis. Upon that lofty eminence, Mr. Davis has erected buildings of so fine and expensive a character, from which views of such superlative magnificence can be obtained, that the visitor has almost as much curiosity to know the career of the man who did all this as to see the scenes themselves. Mr. Davis was born in Hastings, England, on November 16, 1815. At that historic spot, the site of the battle which left William the Conqueror in possession of England, he spent the first fifteen years of his life. His uncle, a captain in the British army, then appointed him his valet; and he entered a postilion school to learn how to take the proper charge of a...

Read More

Biography of Anderson Cox

ANDERSON COX. – There has never lived a man in the Northwest more worthy of commemoration than that pioneer of 1845, Anderson Cox. He was born near Dayton, Ohio, in 1812, of Quaker parentage, and moved with the family to Indiana in 1830, and claimed a share in the home formed on the Wabash river at Attica. He was married in 1836 to Miss Julia Walter, and in 1840 removed to New London, Iowa. In 1845, with his wife and four children, he made the journey to Oregon, and was in the company of immigrants who endured the privations and rugged experiences of the “Meek cut-off”. At the Des Chutes, the crossing of this turbulent river was effected by drawing the loaded wagon-beds over as ferries by means of ropes. Two canoes served to convey the family and their goods from The Dalles to a point known as Parker’s cabin, on the Lower Columbia. A return to The Dalles from this point was attempted, with flour for the immigrants still coming, and with the purpose of bringing down the wagons left at the mission. The journey, however, was discontinued at the Cascades, as there the flour was all given away to hungry parties coming from above, and as news was received that the wagons had been burned by the Indians. Returning to the Willamette, he found work and an...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Hon. Alvin T. Ferriss

HON. ALVIN T. FERRISS.- This representative citizen of Eastern Washington was born in Mount Pleasant, Iowa, in 1852, being the son of James R. and Mary Worth Ferriss. He resided at his birthplace until fifteen years old, at that date removing with his parents to Northwest Missouri. In the spring of 1872 he came west to Denver. After a short stay among the Rocky Mountains, engaged in mining and other operations, and at one time as railroad contractor on the Oregon Short Line, he crossed the continent in 1883 to Washington Territory, and, after looking over the country, selected Pullman as his future home. Soon after his arrival, he started the present large hardware business with Charles Kingman. In two years he was joined by his brother, James Ferriss, and conducted the business under the firm name of Ferriss Bros. In June, 1887, they suffered a loss of twelve thousand dollars above insurance by fire, but in the same year rebuilt, erecting their present commodious building where they carry a stock worth forty thousand dollars, and are the largest firm in their line in the Palouse country. Besides his mercantile business, Mr. Ferris is also active in financial circles, being president of the Pullman Bank. In the fall of 1888, his popularity was evinced by his election as representative of Whitman county on nominating of the Republican party, receiving...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest