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Location: Whitman County WA

Hart, Charles Henry – Obituary

Charles H. Hart, 76, veteran Spokane apartment house owner, died at a hospital here [August 24, 1950] yesterday. He was a farmer in the Thornton area at the turn of the century. He later moved to Colfax for a short time and came to Spokane in 1925. He lived in the Hart Apartments, W1621 Sixth. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge in Colfax. Mr. Hart is survived by his wife, Ada, at the home; four sons, Ralph, Thornton; Ray, Gig Harbor; Roy, Tacoma, and Ira Hart, Atlanta, Ga., and a brother, Oce Pointer, Spokane. The body is at Bruning’s in Colfax. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Bilyeu, George Henry

Bilyeu, George Henry passed away in Spokane, July 6. His home was Tekoa. Survived by 1 son, Roy Bilyeu, Spokane; 1 sister, Mrs. Ed Lauritzen, Tekoa; 1 brother, Ed Bilyeu, Tekoa; 1 granddaughter. Funeral arrangements in care Kimball Funeral Home, Tekoa, Wash. Spokesman Review, July 8, 1954 Contributed by: Shelli...

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History of Steptoe Butte

The line of longitude 117 degrees and 8 minutes W. crosses the line of latitude 47 degrees and 2 minutes N. very near the summit of Steptoe butte. It is beautifully and symmetrically proportioned, being cone-like in shape; its north and east faces, however, fall away with greater abruptness than either the south or west elevations, the west being elongated by a ridge sloping from near its mid-side to the general level of its base. The steepness of the north and east sides is such as to render ascent from those directions laborious and difficult, even to the footman....

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Tradition of Steptoe Butte

In the fall of 1878 the family of which the writer, then a boy of twelve years, was a member, arrived in the Palouse country, Washington Territory, and secured temporary quarters on the Palouse River where the town of Elberton has since been built. At that time it was the site of a sawmill owned and operated by the well-known and highly respected pioneer, G. D. Wilber. One night during the winter that followed, in company with an older brother, we were driving the horses in from the hills to be stabled and fed. It was a most beautiful night. A full moon, high in the heavens, flooded the landscape with a mellow light of such transparency that one could almost have read common print in the open. The temperature stood at about fifteen above zero, and the winds, halted in their course, rested upon the land motionless and silent. A coating of snow about a foot in depth enveloped the country, and the accumulated frost clinging to the needles of the pine and to the twigs of the aspen glistened like tinseled drapings. The picturesque grandeur of the scene as it appeared at that hour of the night, duplicated on countless other nights, is still vivid in memory. Objects could be plainly discerned at a great distance; the outlines of the hills, each of which sat among the...

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Biography of Ira Stubblefield

A man of great adaptability, with vigor to carry him through his various undertakings, and wisdom to guide him in the safe path, and, withal, possessed of executive force to manipulate enterprises with success, the subject of this article is a man to whom we gladly accord representation in this volume of Harney county history. He was born in Blanco county, Texas, on April 28, 1866, being the son of W. K. and Eliza (Lumas) Stubblefield. The father of our subject was born in Tennessee, October 30, 1816, and at the age of fourteen went to Bolivar, Missouri, and in his twentieth year he went to Texas and lived in twenty-three different counties in that state. He was on the frontier all of the time and did much hunting and scouting and fought the Indians continually. He was with the noted cattle king, Bob Tout, and the two doubtless slew more Indians when the savages were on the murderous raids than any other men of the country. At one time eight white men, including Mr. Stubblefield and Bob Tout, were attacked by Indians, seventeen in number, and all of the whites fled but Stubblefield and Tout and two companions, and they fought the savages to a finish, completely whipping them. Mr. Stubblefield was in many a battle and skirmish with the treacherous savage and always came out victorious. In...

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Lee, Robert E. – Obituary

The funeral service for Bob Lee, 75, retired Colfax dairy truck driver, will be Saturday, Dec. 23, at 11 a.m. in the Colfax United Methodist church with the Rev. Bob Ingalls and the Rev. Davis Hylkema officiating. Burial will follow in the Colfax Cemetery. Mr. Lee died Monday, Dec. 18, 1995, at Whitman Hospital in Colfax. Born Christmas Day, 1919, near Endicott to Louis and Stella Frasier Lee, he moved with his family to Colfax as a young boy, attended Colfax schools, and graduated from Colfax High School. He and Maxine Campbell were married Jan. 25, 1942. He was employed with the state and county road departments and was then employed as a driver with Prouty Brothers Dairy in Colfax. He then operated his own milk delivery route, serving homes and businesses in the Colfax area until he retired in March of 1982. Mr. Lee was a member of the Colfax United Methodist Church. Mrs. Lee died in Aug. 2, 1993. Surviving are his son, Bob Lee, Bothell; one sister, Bessie Rice, Colfax,; one brothers, Claude W. Lee, Auburn, and one grandson. The family suggests memorials be gifts to the United Methodist Church Building Fund, Whitman Hospital Foundation or the Council on Aging. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Biography of Daniel G. McKenzie

DANIEL G. McKENZIE. – This is also a pioneer who found all the lands surrounding Pullman, Washington Territory, a sea of bunch-grass. He was born in Illinois in 1842. His father, Henry McKenzie was one of the early settlers of that state, and served in the Black Hawk war, and he came afterwards a pioneer of Iowa, building the town of Winterset. As county commissioner he conceived the idea of building a county-seat, and with the two other commissioners bought one hundred and sixty-acres of land near the center of the county, sold enough lots off from it to pay the purchase price, and deeded the tract to the county, naming the place after his old home. The town flourished; and the sale of lots has been sufficient to obtain all the money for county buildings without taxation. There the subject of this sketch grew up, and in 1855 was married to Miss Sarah A. Bell, and removed to Texas, but the next year returned to Iowa, and afterwards made his home in Kansas. He was in the old West until 1877, when he came to his present locality, taking a claim on the sight of Pullman. There he began living and improving; and the country has settled up and the town grown around him. He is very hopeful of the future of the city and county, believing this...

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Biography of John Pattison

JOHN PATTISON. – The subject of this sketch was born in Albany, New York, in 1859, and is the son of John and Elizabeth Pattison. His father was a Union soldier during the war of the Rebellion. He lived at home until he was fourteen years old, being educated in the city public schools. In 1873 he went to Silverton, Colorado, and engaged in mining for six years with varying though reasonable success. he went from there through Arizona and New Mexico, looking for a better mining location, and spending about two years in that country, making money, but at heavy expense. He came from there to Colfax, Washington Territory, in April 1882. He worked for about two years with the construction party in building the Palouse branch of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Palouse Junction, on the Northern Pacific Railroad, to Colfax, being employed in the position of commissary. He secured an interest in the Colfax Hotel, and was one of the proprietors of that house for two and a half years, jointly with Joseph Ryan. He was married on the 7th of June, 1885, to Miss Mary C. Cairns, daughter of Reverend James Cairns, present pastor of the Colfax Baptist church, and financial agent of Colfax College. He sold his interest in the hotel to Mr. Ryan in August, 1886, and engaged in the real-estate,...

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Biography of Hon. L. M. Ringer

HON. L.M. RINGER. – There is moral earnestness about a man who is able to hold his own convictions in the face of his neighbors and friends. We find such a man in Mr. Ringer. Born June 17, 1834, in Washington County, Maryland, he moved as a child to Amherst County, Virginia, there receiving his education, but later making his home in Stoddard  County, Missouri, engaging in the mercantile business. When the war broke out in 1861, that community was strongly for secession. Mr. Ringer was obliged either to enter the rebel army or to leave. He chose the latter course. The Confederate authorities at once confiscated his property. He thereupon went to Patterson, a post occupied by the Union forces, and was appointed clerk in the ordnance department. Soon afterwards he returned to Bloomfield, Missouri, a place held at that time by the United States troops. He was there appointed sheriff of the county, and adjutant of the post. He was thereafter elected to the position of sheriff and collector, having a detachment of volunteer state cavalry as body guard, and served continuously until the close of the war. he was “true blue” in that difficult position, enforcing the law rigidly during those distracted times, maintaining the national authority, and even compelling the respect of the rebel sympathizers themselves. In 1870 he left Missouri for Oregon, and settled...

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Biography of Wylie A. Lauder

Among those who have been distinctly conspicuous in connection with the substantial up-building and legitimate progress of the attractive little city of Moscow, the county-seat of Latah county, very definite recognition must be given to him whose name initiates this paragraph. It was his fortune to be on the ground when the town practically had its inception, and with every advance movement he has been prominently identified, being recognized as one of the leading and most enterprising business men of the place and as one who has contributed liberally and with enthusiasm to every cause which has had as its object the growth and prosperity of Moscow. Mr. Lauder traces his ancestral line through many generations of sturdy Scottish stock, he himself being of but the second generation on American soil, since his father, William Lauder, was a native of bonnie Scotland, the fair land of “brown heather and shaggy wood.” Wylie A. Lauder is a native of Canisteo, Steuben County. New York, where he was born in July, 1857, the son of William and Mary (Cameron) Lauder, the former of whom was born in Scotland, as has already been noted, while the latter is likewise of Scottish ancestry. William Lauder came to the United States in the year 1845, locating at Duanesburg, New York, where was eventually solemnized his marriage to Miss Mary Cameron. In the year 1869...

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Biography of Frank L. Moore

The junior member of the prominent law firm of Forney, Smith & Moore, of Moscow, is Frank Latham Moore, who was born in Olmstead County, Minnesota, February 8, 1863, and is of Scotch-Irish ancestry. The family was early founded in Canada, the great-grandfather of our subject being its progenitor there. The grandfather, Chauncy Moore, was born in Canada, and when a young man removed with his family to Rochester, New York, where Reuben Billings Moore, father of our subject, was born in 1826. The grandfather removed from Rochester to Putnam County, Illinois, where he secured land from the government and made his home until his death, in 1844, when he had reached the age of forty-three years. His wife was a cousin of Captain Johnson, who fought in the war of 1812, and is credited with having killed the Indian chief and warrior, Tecumseh. Her people were of German descent and were early settlers of the Mohawk valley. In 1849 Reuben B. Moore crossed the plains to California with oxen, being the first to arrive at Sutter’s Fort that year. He mined on Feather River, but was principally engaged in constructing ditches and flumes to convey water to the miners. He met with a satisfactory degree of success during his ten years residence in California, and then returned to Illinois. Soon afterward he removed to Rochester, Minnesota, where he...

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Biography of Michael C. Normoyle

In the olden days the kings and rulers of countries erected palaces, temples or shrines in honor of themselves and to serve as monuments perpetuating their memory after they had passed away, but how much more does one do for civilization and his fellow men who aids in the substantial upbuilding of a city, the promotion of enterprises that add to its prosperity or the establishment of movements that produce progress and improvement along intellectual, social and material lines. Such Michael Charles Normoyle has done. No resident of Kendrick through the past nine years has done more for the city than he, for through the establishment and conduct of private business interests he has led to the improvement and growth of the town. He is a most loyal and public-spirited citizen, and is now the possessor of a handsome capital, which has come to him through his own labors. A bellboy in a hotel at the age of ten, he is now proprietor of the St. Elmo Hotel, one of the best in the state of Idaho, and has other extensive and profitable investments which render him the heaviest taxpayer in Kendrick. A native of Troy, New York, Mr. Normoyle was born September 8, 1853, and is of Irish lineage. His parents, John and Bessie (Clancy) Normoyle were both born in Ireland, and came to the United States with...

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Biography of William Fine

WILLIAM FINE. – Any compilation that purports to chronicle the careers of the leading men of Union and Wallowa counties would be open to great criticism, were there failure to incorporate therein an epitome of the gentleman, whose name initiates this paragraph, since he is one of the most influential and prominent men of this entire section, being well known over the two counties and as highly esteemed as he is widely known: and since he has achieved a good success here in various enterprises, thus demonstrating his ability to handle the affairs of the business world in a winning manner: and since he is possessed of a genial nature and affability and integrity that stamp him as one of the stanch and substantial citizens. Our subject is a product of the Webfoot State, being born in Marion county, on January 30, 1854, to Thomas L. and Amelia J. (Haskin) Fine, natives respectfully of Missouri and Illinois. The father came to Oregon in 1847, went to California in the following year, took up stock raising there on the Feather river, also operated a ferry boat on the river until 1852, then sold out and returned to Oregon, taking a donation claim of one half section in Marion county. Stock raising and farming occupied him there until 1864, when he sold out and brought cattle to Walla Walla county, remaining...

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Biography of William McIlroy

WILLIAM McILROY. – The active and capable gentleman whose name appears above, is one of Union county’s progressive and enterprising stockmen and agriculturists, having wrought here as well as elsewhere with display of ability and sagacity that commend him to all lovers of thrift and industry and which have resulted in the accumulation of a goodly portion of property and the placing of our subject among the most prominent and influential men of this section, while his integrity and uprightness are commensurate with his other characteristics. Iowa City, Iowa, is the birth place of our subject, and July 27, 1861, the date of this event, while his parents were James and Mary A. (Calahon) McIlroy, farmers of that state. The father migrated to Oregon later in life and lived on a farm east from Elgin. At the budding of his majority, our subject inaugurated independent action, going to South Dakota where he farmed for two seasons then came to Washington, tilling the soil in Walla Walla and Whitman counties for two years. In 1885 he came to Union county, settling on a farm three and one-half miles east from Elgin for five years when he sold and repaired to Los Angeles, California, farming there for three years. Returning to Elgin in 1893, he remained in the town for a time and then rented S.S. Thompson’s farm for some time...

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Schuldt, Ollie Marie Lee – Obituary

The funeral for Mrs. Elmer (Ollie Marie) Schuldt, 86 long-time resident of Colfax, was held at the L. L. Bruning Chapel Monday afternoon with the Rev. Rollin Stierwalt officiating. Burial followed in the Colfax Cemetery. Born Jan. 17, 1888, at Thera, to William and Tressa Lee, pioneers of this area, she spent her entire lifetime in the Colfax area except for a few years at The Dalles, Ore. She and her husband operated a variety store in Colfax for several years. Mrs. Schuldt was a member of the Methodist Church, Aloha Club, and Grandmothers club. She died Oct. 17 at Whitman Community Hospital. Surviving are her husband, Elmer F. Schuldt, at the home in Colfax; two daughters, Mrs. Everett (Willene) Taylor, Kennewick; and Miss Shirlee Schuldt, Colfax; and two grandchildren. [Died October 17, 1974] Contributed by: Shelli...

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