Location: Westchester County NY

Henry Day Todd of Cooperstown NY

Henry Day Todd8, (Caleb7, Jehiel6, Stephen5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Nov. 8, 1809, in Cooperstown, N. Y., he was three times married, first, Feb. 8, 1832, Thankful Evans, who was born Feb. 14, 1813, in Hindsdale, N. H., died Dec. 15, 1832, he married second, May 13, 1839, Lois Weeks, who was born Jan. 13, 1816, in Clarendon, Vt., died Nov. 1, 1856, he married third, May 9, 1857, Tasile Croteau, who was born April 17, 1831, in Montreal, Canada. Child by Thankful Evans: *2024. Isabella T., b. Dec. 15, 1832. Child by Lois Weeks: *2025. Sabra Amelia, b. Oct. 13, 1843. Children by Tasile Croteau: 2026. Hattie Lois, b. May 1, 1858; is unmarried and lived at 59 Monument Ave., Charlestown, Mass. *2027. Henry Caleb, b. Aug. 13, 1859. *2028. Emma Louise, b. July 4, 1862. *2029. Thomas Eugene, b. July 2,...

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Wappinger Tribe

Wappinger Indians (‘easterners,’ from the same root as Abnaki). A confederacy of Algonquian tribes, formerly occupying the east bank of Hudson River from Poughkeepsie to Manhattan Island. and the country extending east beyond Connecticut River, Conn. They were closely related to the Mahican on the north and the Delaware on the south. According to Ruttenber their totem was the wolf. They were divided into 9 tribes: Wappinger proper Manhattan Wecquaesgeek Sintsink Kitchawank Tankiteke Nochpeem Siwanoy Mattabesec Some of these were again divided into subtribes. The eastern bands never came into collision with the Connecticut settlers. Gradually selling their lands as they dwindled away before the whites, they finally joined the Indians at Scaticook and Stockbridge; a few of them also emigrated to Canada. The western bands became involved in war with the Dutch in 1640, which lasted five years, and is said to have cost the lives of 1,600 Indians, of whom the Wappinger proper were the principal sufferers. Notwithstanding this, they kept up their regular succession of chiefs and continued to occupy a tract along the shore in Westchester County, N. Y., until 1756, when most of those then remaining, together with some Mahican from the same region, joined the Nanticoke, then living under Iroquois protection at Chenango, near the present Binghamton, N. Y., and, With them, were finally merged into the Delaware. Their last public appearance was...

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Manhattan Tribe

Manhattan Indians (‘the hill island,’ or ‘the island of hills,’ from manah ‘island’, –atin ‘hill.’ Tooker). A tribe of the Wappinger confederacy that occupied Manhattan Island and the east bank of Hudson river and shore of Long Island Sound, in Westchester County, New York. Early Dutch writers applied the name also to people of neighboring Wappinger tribes. The Manhattan had their principal village, Nappeckamack, where Yonkers now stands, and their territory stretched to Bronx river. From their fort, Nipinichsen, on the north bank of Spuyten Duyvil creek, they sallied out in two canoes to attack Hendrik Hudson when he returned down the river in 1609. Manhattan Island contained several villages which they used only for hunting and fishing. One was Sapohanikan. The island was bought from them by Peter Minuit on May 6, 1626, for 60 guilders’ worth of trinkets 1Martha J. Lamb, Hist. City of N. Y., I, 53, 1877 . Their other lands were disposed of by later sales. Footnotes:   [ + ] 1. ↩ Martha J. Lamb, Hist. City of N. Y., I, 53,...

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Biography of Hon. Emory C. Ferguson

HON. EMORY C. FERGUSON. – Mr. Ferguson, whose portrait is placed in this history, was born on a farm in Westchester county, New York, March 5, 1833, and is the son of Samuel S. and Maria (Haight) Ferguson. He resided in his native county and learned the trade of a carpenter until reaching his majority. April 5, 1854, he with his brother Yates (who came to California in 1849 and had returned East) started via the Isthmus of Panama for the Golden State, arriving in San Francisco in May. Our subject immediately proceeded to the mines on the middle fork of the American river, where he followed merchandising and mining until 1856. He then embarked in the sawmill business in Greenwood valley, El Dorado county, which he conducted until the Frazer river excitement in 1858. He then came north, but a short time in the mines convinced him of their worthlessness; and he began to retrace his steps. Coming down the Sound, he located in Steilacoom, where he followed his trade until 1860. He then conceived the idea of cutting a trail across the Cascade Mountains to reach the Rock creek and Smilikamun mines, he locating on the present site of Snohomish city, where he built a log cabin which he used as his headquarters, and also kept a small general merchandise store. The cutting of the trail proved...

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Biography of Capt. John Harford

CAPT. JOHN HARFORD. – This distinguished captain, whose portrait is given here, is now a resident and one of the principal owners of the townsite of Pataha City, Washington, and was born in Westchester county, New York, February 14, 1828. In 1842 he removed to Kendal county, Illinois, and in 1850 journeyed westward to the city of San Francisco. In 1852 he located in Placer county, California, on a ranch where now stands the little city of Lincoln. He removed thence to Marysville, where he engaged in the butcher business until 1855. There he purchased a band of sheep at ten dollars per head which had been driven from Ohio. After the investment, he again became a rancher, and soon afterwards married Miss Maggie Harris, a woman who has proved herself a model wife and mother, and whose kind and winning ways have ever made for her household a home of happiness and love. In 1862 the captain removed to San Louis Obispo, where he erected the first wharf and the first warehouse building in that now Port Harford. He also became a member of the firm of Schwartz, Harford & Co., lumber dealers. With a capital of but five hundred dollars each, the partners retired in nine years with a nice little fortune. Captain Harford then commenced building a railroad from Port Harford to the city of San...

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Biography of Richard Jeffs

RICHARD JEFFS. – The subject of this brief sketch was born in Westchester, Westchester county, New York, December 27, 1827, where he was brought up, working on his father’s farm until he was nineteen years of age. He then went to New York City, where he remained for eighteen months. In February, 1851, he started for California by way of Panama, arriving in San Francisco in March of that year. He started almost immediately for the mines, where he remained until 1858. During the great gold excitement of 1858-59, on the Frazer river, British Columbia, when thousands of people were rushing to the new El Dorado, Mr. Jeffs, with that spirit of adventure that has always characterized him, made his way to those then celebrated diggins, and remained there actively engaged in mining for about one year. In 1859 he removed to Whatcom, Washington Territory, where he went into the employ of Captain Henry Roder; and it was he who took to marked the first scow-load of lumber from that place. After working in different places until 1862, he purchased a farm of eight hundred acres on the White river, and followed faring until 1882. In that year the Hopgrowers Association was organized; and Mr. Jeffs was elected president of that association, and removed to Snoqualmie, Washington Territory, to manage their large ho ranch, perhaps the largest in the...

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Spicer, Louise Moore Mrs. – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Louise M. Spicer, 74, of Baker City, died July 11, 2002, at Settlers Park in Baker City. Her funeral will be Tuesday at 10 a.m. at Gray’s West & Co. Pioneer Chapel, 1500 Dewey Ave. Pastor Robin Harris of Settlers Park will officiate. Visitations will be Tuesday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. at Gray’s West & Co. There will be a reception following at Judy and Bill Brown’s home. Disposition will be by cremation. Louis was born July 15, 1927, at Mt. Vernon, N.Y., to Allen and Louise Moore. She married Conrad Spicer on Nov. 17, 1946, in Mt. Vernon. Louise worked as a waitress, and later owned and operated Mr. Sizzle restaurant with her husband and daughters and sons-in-law. After retiring, the couple moved to Florida, and in October 1999 thy moved to Baker City as the first residents at Settlers Park. Louise is survived by her daughters and sons-in-law, Judy and Bill Brown of Baker City, and Janet and Bruce Rumford of Milford, Conn.; grandsons and their wives, Tyler and Corina Brown of Baker City, Aaron and Kathy Brown of Twin Falls, Idaho, Jason and Heather Brown of Boise, Lucas Brown of Boise, Richard and Amanda Rumford, and Chuck and Russell, all of Connecticut; great-grandchildren, Cody, Tori, Alexa, Sidney, Destin and Jersey Brown, and Kiel Rumford; her sisters, Magdalen Grace, Justina and Elizabeth;...

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