Location: Wellington Kansas

Biography of Hon. Charles P. Hangen

Hon. Charles P. Hangen, who has recently finished his second term as member of the State Legislature, is one of the prominent bankers of Sumner County, being cashier of the National Bank of Commerce at Wellington. He was born in Darke County, Ohio, November 9, 1877, but has lived in Kansas since 1882. In that year his parents, Christian and Sarah Hangen, came to Kansas and located six miles southwest of Wellington on the farm still owned by Mrs. Hangen. Christian Hangen was a native of Germany and his wife of Ohio. He was successfully identified with general farming and stock raising in Sumner County until his death in 1903 at the age of fifty-five. In the meantime he had acquired a fine place of three quarter sections of land. His widow now resides in Wellington. Charles P. Hangen in addition to the local schools attended the business college at Fort Scott, and has lived in Wellington since he was twenty-one years of age. In 1906 upon the organization of the National Bank of Commerce he was elected cashier, and his financial ability and his personal popularity have been important factors in the success and growth of that institution to one of the strongest banks in that part of Kansas. Mr. Hangen is an active democrat. He was first elected a member of the House of Representatives from the...

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Biography of Owen Jason Wood

Owen Jason Wood is a lawyer by profession, had been a resident of Topeka since 1890, and for many years had been assistant solicitor for Kansas of The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company. He gained his first knowledge of life in the world in the northwest corner of Indiana, in Lake County. He was born at Crown Point, the county seat, August 10, 1853. His parents were Martin and Susan G. (Taylor) Wood. His father owned a farm and represented one of the early pioneer families of Northwestern Indians and he was a lawyer by profession, and was in practice at Crown Point from 1848 until 1892. He died in 1892 und his widow is now Living at Topeka with her son Owen J. in her ninetieth year. Martin Wood was considered a man of prominence in Lake County, Indiana, and for two terms represented the county in the Indiana Legislature. His earlier years Owen Jason Wood spent on a farm. That environment was a source of good health and of many associations which he had always prized, but the knowledge of farming gained then be had never put to further use. He attended the graded schools in Crown Point, read law in his father’s office, was admitted to the bar and also attended the law department of Indiana State University. He was graduated in June, 1876,...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel E. Bartlett

Samuel E. Bartlett, lawyer, of Ellsworth, Kansas, was born on a farm near Wellington in Sumner County, Kansas, January 18, 1882, a son of Samuel Coan Bartlett and Mary Catherine (Wheeler) Bartlett. He is a graduate of the Sumner County High School in 1901, and a graduate of the University of Kansas in 1905, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts and in 1908 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Mr. Bartlett was admitted to the bar in 1908 and began the practice of law at Ellsworth. He was appointed city attorney of Ellsworth in 1909, which position he had since held. He was elected county attorney of Ellsworth county in 1910 and was twice re-elected. He is engaged exclusively in the practice of law. In 1911 Mr. Bartlett married Miss Frances Brewster, danghter of Samuel W. and Hattie (Mills) Brewster, the former an attorney at Chanute, Kansas. Both Mrs. Bartlett and her father are also gradustes of the University of Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. Bartlett have two children, Samuel Brewster, born July 8, 1913, and Mary Frances, born July 2, 1914. Mr. Bartlett is a member of the Green Chapter of the legal fraternity of Phi Delta Phi; a Master Mason and past master of his lodge at Ellsworth; and an elder in the First Presbyterian Church of Ellsworth. Samuel C. Bartlett, the father of the Kansas...

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Biography of Samuel Price, Rev.

Rev. Samuel Price was identified for many-years with Kansas, and his services and experlences make an important chapter in the life of the state. He was born in Ohio in 1827, his ancestors coming originally from Wales. He was reared and married near Barnesville, Ohio. For a number of years he was editor of the Barnesville Enterprise. In 1878 Rev. Mr. Price removed to Humboldt, Kansas, where he acted as a Methodist minister for three years. Afterwards he held various pastorates in other cities of Southern Kansas. For three years he was located at Wellington, after which he retired from the active ministry and spent the last twenty years of his life at his home in that city, where his death occurred July 30, 1916. He was a colonel of the East Ohio Militia in the Civil war and in politics a republican. To mention only the bald facts of biography is to do injustice to the nobility of his character and his real influence in his generation. Perhaps two quotations can supply some of the deficiencies in this respect. The first is from a Wellington journal, which spoke of him as “Wellington’s Grand Old Man.” “The Rev. Samuel Price, after thirty-four useful years in this community, had been summoned to his reward He went as he lived, kindly, smiling, brave, leaving behind a ray of sunshine which no...

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Biography of Simon P. Kramer

Simon P. Kramer. During the greater part of the years since 1880, Simon P. Kramer had been a resident of Kansas and had been identified with the milling industry. He is one of the oldest flour millers in the state and had operated in many different towns. In 1915 he removed to Topeka, where he bought and reorganized the Topeka Flour Mills Company, of which he is now president. He had now one of the finest mills in equipment and service in this section of the state. It is equipped throughout with Allis-Chalmers machinery and only recently he gave an order for an oil burning engine to replace the old engine. Mr. Kramer is a thoroughly progressive and alert business man, and under his administration he intends to make the Topeka mills one of the finest plants of the kind in the Middle West. His business interests have taken him to many states, and he had been more or less on the move ever since early manhood. But contrary to the old proverb he had accumnlated a generous share of material prosperity while going from place to place, He was born in Wooster, Wayne County, Ohio, February 15, 1858, one of the twelve children of Jacob and Mary (Miller) Kramer. His father was also a miller by trade, and spent his lifetime in that occupation. He conducted a water...

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Biography of Henry Knight Brooks

Henry Knight Brooks of Topeka is a Kansas man by adoption, and is as loyal to the state as any native citizen. The state may properly congratulate itself that Mr. Brooks has found a congenial home here. As an inventor, manufacturer and practical all around mechanic he has a genius which has made his name familiar in industrial circles, not alone in Kansas but in many parts of the United States. For one thing he deserves credit for building up and developing the Capital Iron Works at Topeka, one of the cornerstones of that city’s industrial prosperity. However, that has been only one phase of his busy career. He was born in Kettering, Northamptonshire, England, January 8, 1869. His father, William Weston Brooks, was a college man and for many years was superintendent of public schools at Kettering in Northamptonshire, and later at Wisbech, Cambridgeshire. His mother was Eliza Knight, whose ancestors were Huguenot fugitives that found refuge in England from their persecutors in France. Mr. Brooks’ matternal grandfather, Joseph J. Knight, was president of Albion College, South Hackney, and became a noted man in the East End of London, where much of his life was devoted to work among the slums and poorer classes. He advocated temperance when such a virtue was almost considered a crime, and he was caricatured as Anthony Hum in the Pickwick papers by...

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Biography of Peter J. Ringler

Peter J. Ringler, who is manager and part owner of the Parsons Bottling Works, one of the largest concerns of its kind in the state, has had a very active and successful business career. He was born in Livingston County, Illinois, December 14, 1868. His grandfather Peter Ringler was born in Kurhessen, Germany, came to the United States about 1876 after his wife had died in Germany, and lived on a farm in Livingston County, Illinois, until his death. In Germany he was a contractor for the building of railroads, and he also served his regular term in the German army. Peter Ringler, Jr., father of the Parsons business man, was born in Kurhessen, Germany, in 1825. He came to this country about 1843, locating first in Baltimore, Maryland, where he was engaged in the bakery business, and afterwards for several years was connected with the Armour Packing Company in Chicago. He was married while living in Chicago and from there moved to a farm in Livingston County, Illinois. That farm was where he reared his children. In 1882 he moved to Sibley, Iowa, continued farming in that state for a number of years, and in 1906 went to the Northwest, spending a short time in Dakots, and from there went to Minnesota. He died in March, 1915, in a hospital at Staples, Minnesota. He was a democrat, had...

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Biography of George H. Hunter

George H. Hunter, a resident of Wellington almost forty years, is one of the leading millers of the state, is president of the oldest bank in Wellington, and has also given much of his time and energies to public affairs, being the present mayor of Wellington. He was born on a farm near Circleville, Ohio, December 1, 1849, one of the five children of Alexander M. and Sophia (Zepp) Hunter, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Pennsylvania. Sophia Zepp was of Pennsylvania Dutch extraction, and when a child was brought to Ohio by her uncle and aunt. Alexander M. Hunter enlisted at the outbreak of the Civil war, but on account of physical disability was not accepted for service. He was a republican and a member of the Congregational Church. He came out to Wellington, was associated with his son in the flour mill from 1879 until 1910, and one day while fishing on a railway bridge was killed by a train, being then nearly ninety years of age. When George H. Hunter was six months of age his parents moved to a farm in Shelby County, Illinois. He had only the advantages of the district schools and his higher education was gained largely through his own efforts and by paying his own expenses through the State Normal University at Normal, Illinois. At the age...

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Biography of Emil B. Roser

Emil B. Roser is one of those quiet and resourceful business men who accomplishes a great deal and makes very little fuss about it and only comes in for a share of public attention when faithful performance of duty requires it. Mr. Roser has been in the jewelry business at Wellington since January 10, 1883. He was born in the City of St. Louis January 27, 1867, one of the five children of Henry and Maria Theresa (Seyler) Roser. His father was a native of Germany and his mother of France, both lived for some years in Nancy, France, and in 1852 emigrated on a sailing vessel to New Orleans. Both had relatives in the United States and they finally located in St. Louis, where Henry Roser followed his business as a merchant tailor for several years. Having relatives in Wisconsin, he removed to that state in 1869, and was thus able to give his children the advantages of the fine Normal School at Platteville and later the State University at Madison. Henry Roser was a man of plain and unassuming character, made many friends, and provided liberally for his family. His wife died at Platteville, Wisconsin, in 1893. Henry Roser like many other German Americans did his full part as a soldier of his adopted country during the Civil war. He enlisted in the Thirtieth Missouri Volunteer Infantry,...

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Biography of Henry Ford Harbaugh

Henry Ford Harbaugh. Even today the great State of Kansas is looked upon as a land of opportunities and a good place for the young man to settle and provide for the future. This is even more true thirty or forty years ago, though it required perhaps a stronger element of individual initiative, courage and ability to endure hardships with patience and fortitude. It was as a young man looking for a permanent home and a country where his energies and talents would be given the freest exercise that Henry Ford Harbaugh arrived in Kansas in 1878. An uncle was living on a farm near Wellington, and that town was his first choice of destination. He came by railroad as far as Newton, and then by horse and wagon drove over a large part of the western and central portion of the state, and from Wichita arrived in Wellington by stage. He was evidently satisfied, because soon after he reached Wellington he bought 160 acres of land, and started with characteristic vigor to farm it and raise stock. He broke much of that land with horse and ox teams, and his first wheat crop was cut with a cradle. He lived simply and frugally, and adapted himself to the hard conditions which surrounded the early Kansas farmers of thirty or forty years ago. For two years after he came...

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Biography of John B. Favor

John B. Favor, present sheriff of Sumner County, has been a resident of Western Kansas for over forty-five years, and though he was a small boy when the family moved here he knows both by recollection and personal experience all the vicissitudes and trials that beset the early pioneers. This story of a pioneer Kansas family begins with the removal of Gaines and Susan (Lavender) Favor from their native state of Tennessee to a farm near Cairo, Illinois, in 1855. On that farm in the southern part of Illinois was born on January 22, 1860, John B. Favor, first mentioned above. A little more than a year later Gaines Favor, who had got well started as a farmer in Southern Illinois and was recognized as a man of some prominence, was killed by the explosion of one of the old-fashioned threshing outfits known as “Groundhog” machines. This was, of course, a calamity in the family history. Besides his widow he was survived by an older son and two daughters in addition to John B. Favor. The work of the farm then fell upon the widowed mother and her children. To make their situation the harder the war broke out, and they were hard pressed to make a living during that period. Selling the Illinois farm and acting on the advice of some uncles and brothers-in-law who were living in...

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Biography of Thomas Walter Butcher

Thomas Walter Butcher. Among Kansas men who have performed services of far reaching benefit to the state there is a distinctive place for Thomas Walter Butcher, now president of the Kansas State Normal School at Emporia. Mr. Butcher began his career as an educator in Kansas, and most of his work had been done within the state. He was born at Macomb, Illinois, July 3, 1867, a son of Boman Rilea Butcher and Adaline (Vail) Butcher. His father was a Union soldier during the Civil war. Mr. Butcher was reared in Illinois and Kansas and attended the public schools of both states. He graduated Bachelor of Arts from the University of Kansas in 1894, and had since accepted opportunities to study both at home and abroad. He had the degree Master of Arts conferred by Harvard University, and spent the year 1908-09 in graduate study in the University of Berlin, Germany. Mr. Butcher had been a teacher all his active life and had dignified the calling as a profession and not as a mere occupation. He began as a teacher in rural schools, afterward was ward principal, high school principal, superintendent of city schools, and through his individual experience had come into the closest touch with educational conditions in the Middle West. He served as principal of the high school at Wellington, Kansas, from 1894 to 1897; of the...

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Biography Of John S. Amick

John S. Amick. It is a strong augury of success for a young man to have a variety of experiences in practical matters before he assumes professional work. Especially if he is a lawyer, his substantial future is far more assured in the West than if he possessed a greater fund of professional knowledge and less ability to judge of persons and things in a common sense way–which comes only with actual experience, and often of the hard kind. Such remarks as the foregoing hold true in the career and progress of John Amick, a young lawyer of Lawrence who had already been county attorney for two terms and proved a strong factor in the advancement of the city’s interests and the protection of county affairs. He was born in Grundy County, Missouri, on December 17, 1879, and is a son of Peter and Lydia Ann (Saylors) Amick, who came to Kansas in the early ’80s and located at Edgerton. There the father operated a store for a short time; then moved with his family to Ottawa, and thence to Wellington. In 1893 the entire household was transferred to Oklahoma, when the scramble for lands was at the height of its vigor, and the parents eventually died there. John S. Amick obtained his early education in the public schools of Kansas, and in 1888 graduated from the Wellington High...

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Biography of Charles T. Bickett

Charles T. Bickett. Well established in business affairs at Coffeyville, with an office for the handling of insurance, collections and also for the discharge of his duties as justice of the peace, Charles T. Bickett has had an unusually wide range of experience and association with Montgomery County, where he has lived since pioneer times. His ancestry goes back to an old English family, and in fact may be traced to that noted scholar and thinker, Thomas a’ Becket, of the fourteenth century. The Bicketts came from England to Virginia in colonial times. From Virginia they spread across the mountains into Kentucky, and Mr. Bickett’s grandfather was born either in Kentucky or Virginia and was a Kentucky farmer. Charles T. Bickett was born at Maryville, Nodaway County, Missouri, February 7, 1860. His father, Hiram J. Bickett, was born at St. Mary’s, Kentucky, in 1813, was reared and married there, was a school teacher for several years, and in 1856 became one of the early settlers in Nodaway County, Northwest Missouri. He taught school in that section of the state until 1876, and in that year moved to Kansas, locating at Wellington, and in 1879 buying a farm three miles west of Liberty in Montgomery County, on which he lived until his death October 14, 1884. He was a Kentucky democrat and a member of the Catholic Church. His, wife,...

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Biography of Amos Albert Belsley

Amos Albert Belsley has been a spirited factor in the business and civic life of Wellington, Kansas, for the past fourteen years. He is one of the leading real estate men of that section, and is a former mayor of the city. His birth occurred on a farm in Woodford County, Illinois, near Roanoke, August 24, 1878. He was the sixth in a family of nine children born to Peter and Cathrine (Schertz) Belsley. His father was born and reared in Woodford County, Illinois, and the grandfather, Peter Belsley, came from Alsace-Lorraine and settled in Illinois in 1830. Peter Belsley, the father, spent his active career as a general farmer and stock raiser, and died in October, 1899, while his wife now lives in Peoria, Illinois. He was very prominent as a democrat, and filled many places of trust in his community. He was president of the Roanoke Coal Mining Company of Roanoke, Illinois, from 1882 until the time of his death in October, 1909. Amos A. Belsley grew up on a farm, attended district school, and from the age of eleven to eighteen he had the opportunity of attending school for only three months each year. Later, as a preparation for his business career, he took a course in the Brown Business College of Peoria, Illinois. It was in 1902 that Mr. Belsley came to Kansas and located...

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