Location: Webster New Hampshire

Biography of Daniel B. Sanborn

Daniel B. Sanborn, a successful farmer of East Concord, Merrimack County, was born in Webster, N.H., April 12, 1840, son of Daniel and Sally (Batchelder) Sanborn. Mr. Sanborn’s grandfather, Tristam Sanborn, came to Webster with his wife and her parents, and took up land on what is now known as Sanborn and Clough’s Hill. He lived to be quite an old man, and remained in this place until his death. He had a large family of children, of whom Daniel, father of the subject of this sketch, was the youngest but one. Daniel Sanborn moved to Canterbury when his son Daniel B. was but an infant. He bought a farm there, but later came to East Concord, and spent his last days here, dying at the age of seventy-two years. During his early life he worked for a time as a stone cutter, but subsequently devoted himself to farming. While living in Canterbury he served as Selectman. His wife, Sally Batchelder Sanborn, was a daughter of Samuel Batchelder, of Northwood, N.H. Their family consisted of four children, including the subject of this sketch: Ann is the wife of Charles L. Brown, and resides in Concord; Frank, the youngest son, married Hattie Blanchard, and has two sons; Mary Etta is unmarried. Daniel B. Sanborn, the eldest child of his parents, received his education in the district schools of Canterbury and...

Read More

Biography of Edmund Silver

Edmund Silver, a thriving farmer of Boscawen, N.H., was born in Bow, this State, September 10, 1834. His parents, Edmund and Sallie (Dow) Silver, who resided in Bow for the greater part of their lives, died when their son Edmund was quite young. They had nine children-Lewis, Laura, Cyrene, Leonard, Gideon, Sullivan, Daniel, Edmund, and George. Lewis died in March, 1897. Daniel is engaged in farming in Salisbury, N.H. George is in Penacook; and the others, except Edmund, the subject of our sketch, are deceased. Edmund Silver received his education in the district schools, remaining at home with his parents until he was seven years of age. He then went to Ware, Mass., where he was employed on a farm; and he was similarly engaged in other towns for a few years, returning subsequently to Bow. At the age of twenty he went to Canterbury, remaining there three and a half years. He then spent three years in Warner, N.H., afterward removing to Webster, in which place he was engaged in farming for about thirty-five years. Subsequently, coming to Boscawen, he purchased his present farm, then known as the Ferrin farm. It contains about sixty-five acres, most of which is under cultivation. Besides general farming he carries on a milk business. He also owns the farm at Webster where he formerly lived, which contains forty-five acres. On November 2,...

Read More

Biography of William F. Wadleigh

William F. Wadleigh, a farmer of Webster, is a native of Laconia, born January 24, 1837, son of Nathaniel R. and Polly H. (Ray) Wadleigh. The father, who was a prominent farmer of Laconia, and was born in 1802, died in 1854. The mother, born March 4, 1806, died in 1870. They had eight children, namely: Mary, now deceased, who was the wife of William Barrett, of Nashua, N.H.; Eliza, deceased, who was the wife of William Thompson, of Barrington, N.H.; Isaac, who married Abbie Davis, now deceased, and lives in Ludlow, Vt.; Almira, deceased, who married James Filgate, of Laconia; Catherine, who is the widow of Amos B. Tibbetts, and lives in Barrington, N.H.; Chase, who married Mary Foss, and resides in Hastings, Minn.; William F., the subject of this article; and Horace, who married Hettie Haywood, and lives in Ludlow, Vt. At the early age of eleven years William F. Wadleigh went to Gilford, N.H., and worked out on the different farms until twenty-one years old, when he tried his fortunes in Lawrence, Mass. Here he was employed for eight years in the soap factory of L. Beach & Son. After his first marriage Mr. Wadleigh removed from Lawrence to Laconia; and four years later he entered on his present farm of five hundred acres in Webster, where he has since lived. He carries on general farming,...

Read More

Biography of Charles E. Putney

Charles E. Putney, a farmer of high standing in Webster, N.H., is a native of that place. He was born June 10, 1827, the son of Stephen and Sallie (Eastman) Putney. His father, who was born February 12, 1765, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, serving in 1780 and 1781. He afterward purchased the farm where Charles E. now lives, and settled down there. He was married three times, first to Sallie E. Eastman, of Hopkinton, who died in 1809; second to Susan Eastman, who died in September, 1820; and then to Sallie Eastman, who died April 6, 1867, aged seventy-nine years. The three wives were cousins. By the first marriage there were six children-Nelson, Enoch, True, Pluma, Anna, and Stephen. The children of the second marriage were five in number-Clarissa, Sarah, David, Lucy, Azariah; and of the third there were four: Charles Monroe, who died in infancy; Mary Angeline; Charles E.; and Samantha S. Mary A. was born July 6, 1825, and died July 20, 1825. Samantha S., born August 3, 1829, married Dustin Spaulding, now a carpenter in Contoocook, N.H., where they now reside. Charles E. Putney, the subject of this sketch, received the ordinary education afforded by the common schools, and always lived at home with his parents. After his marriage he took charge of the old homestead, and carried on farming until his retirement...

Read More

Biography of Enoch Couch

Enoch Couch was a prominent farmer of Webster in his time. He was born in Webster, April 12, 1793, son of Joseph and Sarah (Pillsbury) Couch. His grandfather, Joseph Couch (first), who emigrated from Wales in 1748, settled in Newburyport, Mass. In 1768 the grandfather moved to Webster, and there improved the farm now owned and occupied by his great-grand-daughter. He resided here for the rest of his life, and died in 1784. The first of his three marriages was made with Elsie Rowell, the second with Mary Webster, and the third with Mrs. Muzzey. Born of the first were four children-John, Elsie, Benjamin, and Joseph; and of his second, one daughter, Mary. Joseph Couch, the father of Enoch, was born in Massachusetts, and accompanied his parents to Webster. He succeeded to the possession of the homestead, which he carried on for the rest of his life; and he died February 7, 1821, aged sixty-five years. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, enlisting from Newburyport, Mass. His wife, Sarah, a native of Newburyport, whom he married February 10, 1785, died March 16, 1846, aged seventy-six years. She was the mother of six children, as follows: Enoch (first), born November 23, 1785, who was accidentally killed August 18, 1789; Sally, born August 23, 1787, who married Samuel Little, and died June 5, 1852; Captain Joseph, born May 23,...

Read More

Biography of Charles H. Courser

Charles H. Courser, a retired business man of Henniker, was born in Boscawen, now Webster, N.H., May 19, 1827, son of John and Keziah (Shepard) Courser. The first ancestors of the family were English. His grandfather, John Courser, was a resident of Merrimack County. The father passed the greater part of his life in Boscawen, and died there at the age of ninety-two years. The mother, who was a daughter of John Shepard, a native of Derry, N.H., lived to be eighty-two. Of her children the only survivor is Charles H. Charles H. Courser passed his boyhood in attending school and assisting upon the farm. When about seventeen years old he was apprenticed to the trade of carpenter and millwright. After serving for three years he was employed as a journeyman carpenter and millwright in Boscawen. In 1853 he came to Henniker, and, securing the site of an old privilege, erected a saw and grist mill, and conducted them for fourteen years. He then sold them, and erected in Newport, N.H., another mill, which he sold before it was completed. Soon after, in Pittsfield, N.H., he bought a mill which he rebuilt and operated for nine years, but still resided in Henniker. When his former mill in this town was subsequently offered for sale, he and his son, Fitz H. Courser, bought the property, built a saw-mill upon the...

Read More

Biography of William W. Austin

William W. Austin, a farmer and drover of Webster, N.H., the son of Eldad and Naomi Austin, was born in Webster, then a part of Boscawen, July 1, 1829. His grandfather, Paul Austin, of Georgetown, Mass., was one of the first settlers of the town. Taking up land when the country around it was a wilderness, he cleared and brought under cultivation the large farm where the subject of this sketch now lives. He died in 1852; and his wife, Mehitable Lowell, of Georgetown, died in 1829. They had eight children-John, Sallie, Dorothy, Eldad, Eunice, Mary Ann, William, and Samuel. Eldad, the second son, and the father of Mr. William W. Austin, adopted farming as his occupation, and remained at home with his parents until his marriage, when he bought a farm near by, where he spent the rest of his life. He was a Deacon of the Congregational church at Webster for forty years. He died April 15, 1883, at the age of eighty-three. His wife, Naomi, a native of Webster, died August 15, 1891, aged eighty-nine. They are survived by two of their children, namely: Mary Ann, whose husband, Sherman Little, died September 20, 1895; and William W., of whom we shall now speak. William W. Austin received his advanced education at Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, N.H. He lived at home until he was twenty-eight years of...

Read More

Biography of George Whitefield Abbott

George Whitefield Abbott, of Penacook, President of the J. E. Symonds Table Company, cabinetmakers, was born in West Boscawen, now Webster, N.H., on March 13, 1837. His parents were Nathaniel and Mary (Fitts) Abbott, the former a resident of West Boscawen and the latter of Sandown, N.H. George W. Abbott in his youth, after attending the public schools of Warner, completed his education at a private academy in West Salisbury, N.H. He went immediately to Boston, Mass., where he was employed as a clerk until 1861, when he came to Penacook, N.H., to engage in the grocery business with his brother, under the firm name of H. & G. W. Abbott. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, Seventh New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry, going directly to St. Augustine, Fla., remaining until May, 1863. From that city he went to Morris Island, South Carolina, being engaged all summer at Forts Wagner, Gregg, and Sumter. He then went to St. Helena, S.C.; and in February, 1864, General Truman Seymour, the objective point of which was Lake City, Fla. Severely wounded at the battle of Olustee, Fla., on February 20, he was obliged to stay in the hospital until April, 1865, shortly before the close of the war. Later he was returned to his regiment, and mustered out at Goldsboro, N.C., in June, 1865. Mr. Abbott then returned to Penacook, and...

Read More

Biography of Andrew Jackson Kelley

Andrew Jackson Kelley, Postmaster of Dimond Hill, Hopkinton, a successful agriculturist of this town, and one of the brave men who fought in the late war, was born January 22, 1835, in Webster, Merrimack County, son of Timothy and Jane (Burbank) Kelley. Timothy Kelley was born December 25, 1778, in Kilcoloman, County Waterford, Ireland. He New York. Making his way from that city to Massachusetts, he lived for a time in Newbury, Mass., where he wooed and won his wife. Subsequently, removing to Webster, N.H., he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death, July 15, 1854, aged seventy-five years and six months. His wife survived him many years, dying in May, 1873, at the venerable age of eighty-six years. Andrew J. Kelley spent the days of his boyhood and early manhood in Webster. Soon after the commencement of the late war he enlisted in Company E, Burdan’s sharpshooters, under Captain Amos B. Jones, being mustered into service September 9, 1861. He spent the ensuing winter in Washington on guard duty. In the spring he went to Fort Smith, Virginia, and afterward took an active party in thirty of the more important engagements, including those of Falls Church, Yorktown, the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Petersburg, Manassas, and Mine Run. He remained with his company to the end of the contest, serving forty-seven months, and, though he was continually on the skirmish...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest