Location: Wayne County MO

Biography of Rev. Cyrus R. Rice

Rev. Cyrus R. Rice, of Hartford, is one of the revered fathers of the Methodist Church in Kansas. He comes of a Tennessee family, and was himself born near Lebanon, that state, August 27, 1833. His father was a physician of many years’ practice in Tennessee and Missouri. The son also studied medicine, but his decided inclinations were toward the ministry, and in 1853 he united with the St. Louis Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The next year he was licensed to preach and appointed to the Thomasville Circuit, and in 1855 was sent as a missionary to Osawatomie, Kansas. In March, 1856, he returned to Patterson, Missouri, married Lucy A. McCormick, and spent most of his bridal trip on horseback with his wife, returning to Kansas. During the succeeding three years he organized various societies along the Neoshe River, at Fort Scott and Tecumseh, and in 1859 was assigned to the Shawneetown charge, where he ministered for two years. During the Civil war the Methodist Church, South, withdrew from Kansas and Mr. Rice was without regular appointment until March, 1865, when he united with the conference of the Methodist Episeopal Church and was assigned to the congregations at Centropolis and Prairie City. In 1867 he moved to Lyon County, and was the first presiding elder of the district. After four years of service in that capacity...

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Biographical Sketch of Sanford Martin Withers, M.D.

Dr. Sanford Martin Withers was born in Clearwater, Wayne county, Missouri, November 25, 1891, and is a son of George A. and Avis M. (Martin) Withers, the latter a daughter of the Rev. Samuel Sanford Martin, a pioneer Baptist minister of Illinois. He was a native of Connecticut and married Miss Elmira Palmer, whose birth occurred in Illinois. The grandparents of Dr. Withers in the paternal line were William Price and Mary Elizabeth (Coles) Withers, natives of Kentucky and of Illinois, respectively. George A. Withers, the father, was born at Funks Grove, Illinois, February 13, 1847, and the greater part of his life was devoted to the lumber trade. In 1880 he removed to Clearwater, Missouri, after organizing the Wayne Lumber Company at that place. Dr. Withers is indebted to thorough training in the Washington university School of Medicine for the qualifications which enabled him to take up the work of the profession. He won his degree in 1919, but before entering upon preparation for medical practice he had served as assistant city chemist of Kansas City, Missouri, in 1910 and 1911. In June, 1920, he took up the practice of dermatology and is giving his attention to this branch. Dr. Withers is a veteran of the World war, having served with Base Hospital unit, No. 21, from May 11, 1917, until invalided to the united States in May,...

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Biography of Hon. Robert L. Coleman

HON. ROBERT L. COLEMAN. It is the men of broad and comprehensive views who give life to communities and build cities-men who have foresight and energy, pluck and push to forward their enterprises and still retain an untarnished reputation through it all. Such a man is Hon. Robert L. Coleman, now circuit clerk and recorder and ex-representative of Carter County. He was elected to his present responsible position in 1890 by the Democratic party, of which he is a zealous member. Previous to this, in 1886, he was elected school commissioner, held that position two years, and was elected to represent the county in the Thirty-fifth General Assembly of the State. At present he is a candidate for the office of circuit clerk and recorder, with fair prospects of success. Mr. Coleman is a young man who was born in Carter County, Missouri, August 17, 1863. Son of Francis M. and Adaline (Fancher) Coleman, natives of Tennessee. His grandparents, William and Nancy (Hackett) Coleman, were probably natives of the Old North State, moving from there to Tennessee, and thence to Kentucky, where they remained until about 1859. They then moved to Carter County, Missouri, and there passed the closing scenes of their lives. William Coleman was a farmer and held the office of treasurer of Carter County for a number of years. Our subject’s maternal grandparents, Wesley and Celia...

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Biography of James M. McGhee

JAMES M. MCGHEE. This gentleman, well known in Carter County, is at present the most efficient county clerk of the same. He came originally from Georgia, his birth occurring December 17, 1854, and he no doubt inherits much of his vim and enterprise from his Scotch-Irish ancestors. His grandfather McGhee was an early pioneer in east Tennessee, and there John F. McGhee, father of subject, was born and reared. He was trained to the duties of the farm at an early age and received but a limited schooling, as his father died when he was young. When grown he moved to Georgia, and there married Miss Nancy Harris, a native of Georgia and a daughter of a pioneer of that State. About 1856 he and his wife moved to Wayne County, Missouri, and settled near where Piedmont is now located, buying a farm and making their home there until 1860. From there they moved to Oregon County, Missouri, and located in the southeast part of the same, where they made their home during the war. In 1865 they moved back to the old home in Wayne County, and in that county Mr. McGhee died in 1881 and his wife in 1884. During the war he was a lieutenant in the Confederate Army for a short time. After living on the farm in Wayne County for some time Mr. McGhee...

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Biography of Anderson Coleman

ANDERSON COLEMAN. It is a pleasure to chronicle the history of a man whose life has been one of honor and usefulness, and although he is considerable past the zenith of his career, Mr. Coleman has accumulated sufficient means to pass his declining years in peace and plenty. He is one of the old pioneers of Carter County, Missouri, to which section he came in 1858, and is honored and esteemed throughout its length and breadth. Mr. Coleman was born in Tennessee, October, 14, 1822, and the son of William and Betsey (Vaughan) Coleman, both of whom died in North Carolina. The father was a soldier in the War of 1812. The grandfather, Spencer Coleman, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. His ancestors came from England to America prior to the Revolutionary War, and settled in Virginia. Anderson Coleman was one of eleven children and when a young man removed to North Carolina. Later he returned to Tennessee, and in 1858 he came to Carter County, making the journey with ox teams, and settled in Carter County, on a farm near Van Buren, where he resided seventeen years. For some time during his residence in Carter County he held the office of constable, elected in 1866 or 1867. From there he moved to Wayne County and later to Reynolds County. All his life he has tilled the soil...

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Biography of Alfred J. Dunegan

ALFRED J. DUNEGAN. Of the many men who are engaged in tilling the soil in Ozark County, Missouri, none is more thrifty, honest and persevering than he whose name heads this sketch. He has followed the occupation of farming from his earliest boyhood, and as a result every detail of this line of human endeavor is familiar to him, and he may be said to be an honor to the calling. He was born in White County, Tennessee, in 1817, of which State his parents, Samuel and Sallie (Speers) Dunegan, were also natives, in which State they made their home until 1843, when they removed by wagon to Wayne County, when that section was wild and unsettled. Mrs. Dunegan died there shortly before the war, after which Mr. Dunegan came to Ozark County, and was here called from life about 1880. His father, Absalom Dunegan, is supposed to have been a North Carolinian, from which section he removed to Tennessee, dying in White County when Alfred J. was a small lad. He was by occupation a hammersmith, as was also his son Samuel, and the latter also followed the calling of a potter for some years. He was the father of eight children as follows: Alfred J.; Charley was a soldier with Sterling Price, and was killed at Santa Fe, N. M. during the Mexican War; Samuel is a...

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Biography of Hon. Richard P. Bland

HON. RICHARD P. BLAND. From poverty and obscurity all the eminent men of the West have fought their way in the battle of life, and by their own persistence and perseverance have attained to prominence and honor. They have given permanency to every enterprise that they have honored with their patronage and have stamped upon them their own individuality. The subject of this sketch is a man well known to the people of Missouri, and needs no eulogy from the pen of the biographer, for his deeds are his monuments and will endure long after he has moldered into dust. He was born near Hartford, Ohio County, Kentucky, August 19, 1836. His parents Stouton E. and Margaret (Nall) Bland, both of whom were born on Blue Grass soil. The family originally came from Virginia, but emigrated to Kentucky in the time of Daniel Boone, and were among the early settlers of that country. The father devoted his life to the occupation of farming, and at the age of thirty-five, when just in the prime of life, was called upon to pay the last debt of nature, his widow surviving him several years. Of the four children born to them three are now living: Richard P.; Charles C., who is judge of the Eighteenth Judicial Circuit of Missouri, and Elizabeth, wife of Frederick Tutley, of St. Francois County, Missouri. Young...

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Biography of Cortez F. Enloe, M.D.

Dr. Cortez F. Enloe, a man of strong personality who has been a leader in the public life of Jefferson City for many years and who is numbered among the substantial citizens as well as among the successful physicians of this part of the state, was born in Clarksburg, Missouri, January 28, 1881, his parents being James and Mary (Ryan) Enloe, who were also natives of Missouri. The father was a school teacher in early life but afterward became a merchant and at all times took a deep interest in public affairs, especially in the welfare and improvement o1 the schools. He was for many years county superintendent of schools after he had discontinued teaching. He served in the Civil war as captain of Company F of the Ninth Regiment of provisional Enrolled ‘Militia in 1863. The records in the adjutant general’s office read as follows: “James Enloe, 27th August, 1862, second lieutenant Company B, Forty-second Regiment Missouri Militia-1863. Promoted to Captain Company B, Forty-second Enrolled Missouri Militia, August 20, 1864.” Dr. Enloe obtained a high school education at Versailles, Morgan county, Missouri, but did not graduate and after leaving that institution he became a student in Vanderbilt University of Nashville, Tennessee, where he pursued his medical course, being numbered among the alumni of that institution of 1901, at which time the M. D. degree was conferred upon him....

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Biography of George T. Lee

GEORGE T. LEE. It is a pleasure and a privilege to record the character and enterprise of men of business who, on account of their long tenure and extensive operations, comprise almost a history of the business in which they are engaged. Of such men it is unnecessary to speak in words of colored praise. By their acts ye shall know them.” Their very existence is emphatic evi-dence of the honorable position they occupy and the long course of just dealing that they have pursued. A gentleman in mind is George T. Lee, who was born in Jefferson County, Missouri, February 22, 1844, a son of Giles and Ary (Graham) Lee. Giles Lee was born in Westmoreland County, Virginia, on March 10, 1796, and he was a son of John Lee, who came to this country from England in early times. The Great-grandfather Lee was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Giles Lee was reared in Virginia and came to Missouri in 1819, settling on the Mississippi River. There he passed the remainder of his days engaged in farming and tanning, his death occurring in 1880. His wife was a native of Jefferson County, Missouri, born on Big River in 1827, and she was a daughter of one of the early pioneers who came from Kentucky. Three children were given them: James W., George T. and Margaret V. William...

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Biography of J. Walter Clark

J. Walter Clark. In no state in the Union, perhaps, have the public schools in recent years been given more careful consideration than in Kansas, and this is evidenced by the fact that school boards all over are insisting on higher qualifications and efficiency than ever before. They demand teachers not only of scholarship, but of high moral character, of equable temperament and conventional deportment, rightly contending that these instructors have lasting influence on the youth that is entrusted to them at the most impressionable age. Well qualified in every way is Prof. J. Walter Clark, who, for the past two years, has been superintendent of the schools of Buffalo, Kansas. Entering the teacher’s profession when but sixteen years of age, he has continued in the educational field because he loves the work. No effort has been too great when it has enabled him to add to his store of knowledge, and, although yet a young man, he has many university honors to his credit, and prior to coming to Buffalo, had already admirably filled educational positions of responsibility. J. Walter Clark was born November 6, 1888, at Piedmont, Wayne County, Missouri. His parents are D. M. and Charity L. (Chilton) Clark. The early ancestors came to Virginia, in colonial times, from England, moving later into Kentucky and still later to eastern Missouri. This name is honorably borne in...

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Hovis, Earl – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Former Wallowa County resident, Earl Hovis, of North Bend, died Feb. 1, 1992, at St. Katherine’s Nursing Home in Coos Bay. At his request, no public services were held. Interment will be in Wallowa County at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction of Cool Bay Chapel. Mr. Hovis was born July 12, 1902, in Wayne County, Mo., the son of Robert E. and Minnie Hovis. He came to Wallowa County as a young person and attended Gwynn School, located between Lostine and Enterprise. On June 26, 1924, he married Vivian Emmons at Enterprise. They ranched and farmed in the Prairie Creek area for a number of years. Earl became known as an expert in handling horses. For several years he drove the six horse team on the covered wagon in the Chief Joseph Days pageant and was often driver of the stage coach in the Chief Joseph Days parade. Later the Hovises moved to Joseph where Earl was a log scaler for Boise Cascade until his retirement 22 years ago when he and Vivian moved to Coos Bay, Or. Survivors include his wife, Vivian, of North Bend; sons, Ivan Hovis of Portland and Robert Hovis of San Francisco, Calif.; daughter-in-law, Marjorie E. Hovis of North Bend; sister, Ruth Haggerty of Portland; and grandchildren, Marjorie E. Hovis of North Bend and Lois Kaping of...

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Biography of John Hunt

John Hunt is one of the oldest business men in point of continuous service at Grenola, Kansas. He established a lumber business there more than thirty-four years ago, and today he is the only merchant furnishing lumber and building supplies to the people of that community. He had had a long and active career, and aside from his material achievement he may take special pride in the fact that he had reared a large family of self-respecting, honest and worthy children. He represents old American stock. The Hunts came originally from Wales and were settlers in New Jersey in colonial days. The family in the various generations have not failed to give a good account of themselves when called upon to render patriotic service as soldiers. Mr. Hunt’s grandfather was Elijah Hunt, who died at Trenton, New Jersey, before John Hunt was born. Mr. John Hunt was born at St. Louis, Missouri, June 23, 1842. His father, Isaac Hunt, was born at Trenton, New Jersey, in 1793, and was a boy soldier with a New Jersey regiment in the War of 1812. He was reared and married in New Jersey and spent his active career as a farmer. He was one of the pioneer American settlers in the vicinity of St. Louis, Missouri. He arrived there and secured a claim in St. Louis County in 1820, a year before...

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