Location: Waukesha Wisconsin

Biography of Hon. Ira Colby

Hon. Ira Colby, one of the leading lawyers of the State of New Hampshire, was born in Claremont, N.H., January 11, 1831, son of Ira and Polly (Foster) Colby, both of purely English descent. Their families in the various branches number many persons of distinction. On the maternal side he is descended from Reginald Foster, who came from Exeter, Devonshire, England, and settled in Ipswich, Essex County, Mass., in 1638. It has been stated in an account of the descendants of Joseph Stickney, which appeared in the New Hampshire Granite Monthly of July, 1892, that the family of this Reginald is honorably mentioned in “The Lay of the Last Minstrel” and “Marmion.” When Mrs. Colby was eleven years of age, her father removed with his family from Essex, Mass., to Henniker, N.H., to prevent his sons from becoming seafaring men. She there met Mr. Colby, a native of the place. They were married April 17, 1827, and immediately removed to Claremont, where they ever afterward lived. Mr. Colby was one of the most successful and enterprising farmers of his town, and was honored with many positions of trust. He served as a Selectman in the years 1858 and 1859 and as a Representative of the town in the legislature of New Hampshire in 1872 and 1873. He died in 1873, at the age of seventy years. The subject of...

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Biography of Pearl M. Hollingsworth

Pearl M. Hollingsworth. A newspaper which has had a fine and vitalizing influence in its community is the Fisher News, of which Mr. Hollingsworth is editor and proprietor. This publisher and editor is a journalist from the ground up, had his first acquaintance with the printing trade when a boy and has done much to develop the power of the press in this section of Champaign County and has made his paper indispensable to business men, farmers and citizens generally. Mr. Hollingsworth is a native of Vermilion County, Illinois, where he was born December 20, 1890. He is the youngest of three children, two sons and one daughter, born to Henry and Anna (Martin) Hollingsworth. The daughter, Delia L., is the wife of Howard Barnes, a well known evangelist living in Waukesha County, Wisconsin. The older son, Charles T., is a very successful evangelist and now ranks among the first in that profession in America. During the great revival which moved the country of Wales from center to circumference he was an active worker in that field. The father of these children was born in Illinois, had a common school education, and is now living at Arrowsmith in McLean County. He is a blacksmith by trade. His lineage goes back to England. He was born about 1852, has always been an ardent Republican and is a member of the...

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Biography of Archie Markland Baird

Archie Markland Baird. One of the additions to the manufacturing interests of Topeka, Archie Markland Baird has for many years been known in railroad circles of the state, and has been connected with numerous movements national in their character. His present business is the manufacture of pneumatic labor-saving devices. His knowledge of the business, his wide connections, and his executive capacity have brought his enterprise to a foremost and commanding position. Mr. Baird was born at Kilmarnock, near Glasgow, Scotland, in 1857, and is a son of William and Janet (Markland) Baird, and a grandson of Archibald Baird, also a native of that place. Archibald Baird had a family of twelve sons and one daughter, all of whom grew to maturity, and it is a remarkable fact that all of these sons learned the blacksmith trade from their father, and some of them later came to the United States and became officials in the mechanical departments of several railroads. The children of Archibald Baird were: Andrew I., David, John, William, Thomas, Hugh, James, Elisha, Robert, Adam, Joseph and Andrew II, and one daughter, Jean. Of these, Andrew I died in young manhood; David came to America in 1857, took employment with the New York & New Haven Railroad at Hartford, Connecticut, and was foreman of the blacksmith shops for forty-five years; John was employed by the same railroad company;...

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Biography of W. E. Taylor, M. D.

Placed at the head of a great state charitable institution, carrying the responsibility for the welfare of hundreds of unfortunates whose reason has been shattered and imbued with an earnest desire to restore his unfortunate charges to health and friends, stands Doctor W. E. Taylor, superintendent of the Illinois Western Hospital for the Insane at Watertown. He was born at Waukesha, Wisconsin, May 24, 1854, where his parents, E. T. and Esibell (Irving) Taylor resided. Here his boyhood was spent, and after thoroughly fitting him-self in preparatory schools, he entered the University of Wisconsin, and upon completing a course in that institution, took up the study of medicine at the Hahnemann Medical College at Chicago, from which he graduated. After his graduation, he began the practice of his chosen profession at Monmouth, Illinois, and remained in that city until his appointment as superintendent of the Watertown Hospital for the Insane in 1897, which position he still holds. August 5, 1879, he was married to Miss Vagima McCleary, and of this union two sons have been born, Don and Mac Taylor. Dr. Taylor is a Republican and is prominent in the councils of his party, not merely locally, but throughout the State of Illinois. During the time he resided in Monmouth, he was at the head of the health department of that city for ten years, and was mayor of...

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Biography of J. H. Spines

J. H. Spines. The men who establish, organize and develop successful commercial establishments must possess many qualities out of the ordinary. Their insight into business conditions must be keen and far-reaching, their knowledge of values profound, and their ability to grasp opportunities unlimited. Without industrial and commercial interests no locality progresses, for such enterprises are the very life of a community. The investment and attraction of capital, the employment of labor and the consequent opening of new avenues of endeavor to meet newly created demands, all infuse blood into the veins of a section and endow it with new vigor and strength. That part of West Douglas Avenue, between Main Street and the Arkansas River Bridge, in Wichita, is an excellent example of the above statement. With the location in its midst of an enterprise of the kind mentioned, its business life quickened, new interests were awakened, and it has developed into a prosperous center of the city. The man who is probably principally responsible for this desirable state of affairs is J. H. Spines, proprietor of Spines’ Store and one of the most progressive of the younger generation of business men of Wichita. Mr. Spines was born at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, May 2, 1884. After his graduation from the public schools, his family was not able to help him further in the way of an education, but the youth...

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Biography of Rev. Thomas G. Watson

REV. THOS. G. WATSON. – To the ministry more than to any other class of men does a community owe its moral progress; and with such development opportunity is given for progress in other directions. This is strikingly illustrated in the life of the minister whose name appears above. He was born in Geneva, New York, in 1836, and was educated in his native place, graduating in 1857 from Hobert College. He took his theological course at New Brunswick, New Jersey, and entered upon missionary work at Cayuga county, preaching eight years at Cato, Fair Haven and Victory, and assisting one church out of a heavy debt, and another to purchase a new church and parsonage. His field was then changed to Brighton Heights, Staten Island, at the urgent request of the secretary of Domestic Missions; and his ministry of two years was greatly blessed. His health, however, was broken by excessive labor; and he removed to Wisconsin in the fall of 1872, and settled at Waukesha, which was then becoming a watering place, popular on account of its numerous springs. There he was called to preach to the First Presbyterian church of that place, and consented to do half work, and after a year and a half was installed as pastor. He remained there, laboring also in the interests of Carroll College, until 1883. Under the returning desire...

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