Location: Washington County VT

Migration of Families out of Norwich VT

At the first enumeration of the inhabitants of eastern Vermont, as made by the authority of New York in 1771, Norwich was found to be the most populous of all the towns of Windsor County, having forty families and 206 inhabitants. Windsor followed with 203, and Hartford was third with 190. The aggregate population of the county (ten towns reported) was then but 1,205, mostly confined to the first and second tiers of towns west of the Connecticut River. Twenty years later, in 1791, Hartland led all the towns of the county with 1,652 inhabitants, Woodstock and Windsor coming next with 1,605 and 1,542 respectively. Exceptional causes made the little town of Guilford (now numbering scarcely more than one thousand inhabitants), till after the year 1800, the most populous town in the state. In Norwich, the great falling off in the size of families in recent years is seen in the fact, that in the year 1800, the number of children of school age was 604, out of a total population of 1,486, while in 1880 with a nearly equal population (1,471) it was but 390. In the removal of large numbers of the native-born inhabitants by emigration, we must find the principal cause of the decline of our rural population. Preeminently is this true of Norwich. The outflow of people began very early and now for more than...

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Biography of Captain Eleazar L. Sarsons

Captain Eleazar L. Sarsons, a well-known resident of Acworth and a veteran of the Civil War, was born in Lyme, N.H., August 9, 1836, son of Leon and Flora Ella (Prue) Sarsons. His father, who was born in France in the year 1800, emigrated to Canada in 1828, and in 1834 moved to Sheffield, Vt. He was a shoemaker by trade, and followed this handicraft in connection with farming for some time. He later plied his calling in Lyme, N.H., and other places; and in 1871 he came to Acworth, where he spent the rest of his life. He married Flora Ella Prue, who was born in Canada in 1815. They became the parents of ten children, as follows: Mary; Elinore; Eleazar L., the subject of this sketch; Flora, who was born in 1834, and died in Wheelock, Vt., in 1841; Adeline; Marguerite; William H.; George W., who died in Pennsylvania, December 6, 1880; Ella, born in Barre, Vt., in April, 1852; and Charles, who was born in Orange, Vt., in 1860, and died in 1868. Mary Sarsons became the wife of Henry Townes, of Lake Village, N.H. Her husband died July 1, 1896; and she is now residing in Nashua, N.H. Elinore married George W. Newell, of Nashua, and died May 3, 1889. Adeline married John Williams. Marguerite, who married John Clark, died June 28, 1880. William H.,...

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Biography of John Tyler

John Tyler was well known in Claremont as an inventor and builder. He was a son of John Tyler and a grandson of Benjamin Tyler, both eminent mechanics. Benjamin, who settled in Claremont in the spring of 1776, built the first dam across the Sugar River at West Claremont, and was for many years one of the most public-spirited men in town. The History of Claremont gives the following facts concerning his grandson:- “John Tyler was born in Claremont, March 26, 1818. He learned the trade of millwright, serving an apprenticeship of seven years, and was then for eight years foreman of the shop where he learned his trade in Barre, Vt. West Lebanon in 1850, and for several years did a large business in building mills, sometimes employing fifty men. He returned to Claremont in 1872, where he has since resided. He was engineer and superintendent in building the Sugar River paper-mill, and was a principal stockholder and the President of the company. “Mr. Tyler is the inventor of the Tyler turbine water-wheel, which he had patented in 1856, and which he manufactured for many years. His was the first iron water-wheel made, and nine different patents were subsequently granted him for improvements upon it. These wheels found their way all over the country, some of them also finding their way abroad; and for years they were considered...

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Biography of Hon. Chester Pike

Hon. Chester Pike, a prominent citizen of Sullivan County, New Hampshire, residing in Cornish, his native town, was born July 30, 1829, son of Ebenezer and Judith (Bryant) Pike. On both his father’s and his mother’s side he is descended from distinguished ancestry, and from families that have been conspicuous, not only in the history of New Hampshire, but in the history of the nation. His grandfather Pike was born in Newbury, Mass., and came to Cornish in early manhood, the first of the name to settle here. He bought a farm and a mill on Blow-me-down Brook, and devoted himself to farming and to carrying on the mill. He married Mary Marcy, of Hartland, Vt.; and they had three children-Ebenezer, Chester (first), and Pliny. Chester, first, who never married, died in Northumberland when about thirty-five years of age. Pliny Pike was a farmer of Cornish, and died in that town at the age of seventy years. Ebenezer, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Cornish in 1788, and died in 1862. After completing his studies at school, he purchased and carried on one of the largest stock-raising farms in the county, raising thoroughbred horses for the Boston market. With the exception of Mr. Wainwright, of Vermont, no one else of his time Mr. Ebenezer Pike was always alert to make a good bargain. He traded...

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Biography of Captain Harry C. Fay

Captain Harry C. Fay, editor-in-chief of the National Eagle, a bright and thoroughly up-to-date newspaper published in Claremont, was born in Richmond, Vt., November 30, 1830, son of Captain Nathan and Polly (Colby) Fay. Stephen Fay, his great-great-grandfather, was an early settler in Bennington, Vt., and was the father of eight children. His son John kept the Catamount Tavern, which during his day became a meeting-place for many great statesmen, who formed a legislative body, and held there meetings known as “Councils of Safety.” He, John, fell in the battle of Bennington. His son, Nathan Fay, served as a Colonel Warner’s command. Nathan, who was a cloth-dresser by trade, removed from Bennington to Richmond, Vt., about the year 1781, and established there a cloth-dressing house, which he carried on successfully for a number of years, leaving a flourishing business at the time of his death, which occurred at the age of seventy-seven. He married a daughter of Colonel Safford, a member of an old and prominent family of Bennington. Captain Nathan Fay, father of the subject of this sketch, continued the business of clothdressing after the death of his father; but, it subsequently becoming less profitable, he turned his attention in part to farming, and at the time of his death was the owner of one thousand acres of land. A member in early life of the Democratic party,...

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Biography of Eli A. Boutwell

Eli A. Boutwell, a farmer and lumberman of Hopkinton, N.H., son of Samuel P. and Lydia A. (Allen) Boutwell, was born in Barre, Vt., February 25, 1833. His lineage has not been traced; but a little research would probably show that he belongs to the old New England family of Boutwells, of which the Hon. George S. Boutwell, ex-Secretary of the Treasury, is a representative. Its founder, James Boutwell, said to have been made a freeman in Lynn, Mass., in 1638 or 1639, died in 1651, leaving a wife Alice, sons James and John, and a daughter Sarah. The sons married, and settled in Reading, Mass., John being the ancestor of the distinguished statesman. Some of the descendants of the second James, and perhaps others, have spelled the name Boutelle. Nehemiah Boutwell, grandfather of Eli A., of Hopkinton, was a native of Vermont, and served in the Revolutionary War at the time of the raid on Plattsburg, N.Y., when the English made a naval display. He married Susannah Holt. Samuel P., his eldest child, was born in 1806 in Barre, Vt. He married Lydia A. Allen, a daughter of Nathan and Esther (Paine) Allen. She was a relative of Ethan Allen, and resided in Brookfield, Vt. Samuel P. Boutwell and his wife reared fourteen children, only seven of whom are at present living, most of them in Vermont. Samuel...

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William Henry Harrison Woodbury Genealogy

1. William Henry Harrison2 Woodbury, son of Rufus1 and Charlotte (Knapp) Woodbury, was b. in Northfield, Vt., May 1, 1842; m. May 22, 1866, Ora Ann Dodge Hale, b. Montpelier, Vt., Sept. 24, 1848, dau. of John P. and Susan W. (Going) Hale. He was a soldier in the War of the Rebellion; res. Newport and Hardwick, Vt., and Sullivan Two ch.: John Hale3, b. Apr. 26, 1867, res. in S. on the Asahel Nims Jr. place; m. Dec. 22, 1892, Alice Clinton Dodge, b. Salem, Mass., June 23, 1867; dau. of Charles William and Frances Amelia (Treadwell) Dodge. No children. Susan Augusta3, b. Hardwick, Vt., Mar. 29, 1870, m. May 13, 1897, Miles Harrison Davis, b. Roxbury, Aug. 26, 1840, d. Keene, Dec. 7, 1910; son of Joshua and Eliza (Rice) Davis. He was a farmer and res. Keene on Beech hill in the old James Wright house. They had a son: Harold Woodbury4 Davis, b. Keene, Mar. 30, 1898. Bennajah Woodbury was b. in Potton Township, P. Q., Dec. 11, 1841; d. Stoddard, unm., Apr. 2, 1905; son of Chauncey and Judith (Allard) Woodbury. He died on the Island in Island Pond, where he had been living as a hermit. He was a tenant of the David Seward house at 139, living there in 1878 alone. He never...

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Biographical Sketch of William J. Cashman

Cashman, William J.; lawyer; born, Montpelier, Vt., Oct. 14, 1872; son of John and Jane Byrne Cashman; educated, St. Mary’s College, A. B., 1893; Catholic University of America, LL. B.; 1896, Catholic University of America; LL. M., 1897; St. Mary’s College, LL. D., 1912; married, Cleveland, Jan. 25, 1889, Aloise Grasselli; issue, William, Eugene, Aloise and Frances; admitted to the bar, Boston, Mass., May 25, 1898, Cleveland, 1901; Brady & Cashman; 1905, The Grasselli Chemical Co., legal dept.; director The Grasselli Chemical Co.; member Knights of Columbus, Athletic, Mayfield, University, and Chemists’ Clubs, Chamber of Commerce. Recreation:...

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Cusick, E. A. Mrs. – Obituary

Died-At the residence of S. O. Swackhumer in this city, Saturday, February 11, 1893, Mrs. E. A. Cusick. The deceased, whose maiden name was Emma Amanda Dodge, was born in Montpelier, Vermont, March 20th, 1850. Died in Union, Oregon, February 11, 1893, was therefore nearly 43 years old. When eight years of age she moved with friends to Omaha, Neb., and in the summer of 1863 crossed the plains with her sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. S. O. Swackhumer, stopping in Grande Ronde valley where she has lived most of her life since. She was married in Wasco County, Oregon, in 1865 to James Alger. She was the mother 8 children, 5 boys and 3 girls, all of whom are now dead except two boys, Phillip and Oscar. She lived a widow from May 1st, 1888 until October 11, 1891 when she was married to Wm. Cusick. During her widow-hood she was post-mistress at Union. She was a consistent Christian all of her life and an accepted member of the Methodist Episcopal church for over thirty years. Contributed by: Larry...

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Goodnough, Charles D. (2)

La Grande, Union County, Oregon Funeral to be Tomorrow At 2 Funeral services for Charles D. Goodnough, who passed away at noon yesterday at his home at 801 B avenue are to be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Snodgrass and Zimmerman mortuary. The services in the chapel will be conducted by the B. P. O. Elks lodge and the services in the Masonic cemetery will be conducted by the Knights of Pythias. He will be laid to rest in the family plot. The Rev. M. G. Tennyson, rector of St. Peter’s Episcopal church will officiate. Mr. Goodnough was born in Calais, Vermont on Aug. 28 1855, and crossed the plains to Oregon in 1877, spending the last 53 years of his life here. He was 73 years, 11 months and 4 days of age at the time of his unexpected death. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mary Goodnough, five children: Mrs. James Y. Walnum, Mrs. C. C. Bull, Mrs. Cassie F. Baker, Raymond Goodnough and Ronald Goodnough, all of La Grande, and six grandchildren. Pallbearers for the funeral services follow: L. H. Bramwell, DeLile Green and H. E. Coolidge of the Elks Lodge, and C. K. McCormick, Dr. H. W. Riley and C. M. Humphreys of the K. of P. Lodge. Members of both lodges are to meet at their respective halls at 1:30...

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Mann, Socrates C. (Crate) – Obituary

“Crate” Mann Takes Own Life At Baker Home Socrates C. (Crate) Mann, committed suicide, by hanging, at his home, 1600 Sixth street, Baker, sometime during the afternoon Saturday of last week. The body was found hanging in the garage at six o’clock by Mrs. Mann who went in search of her husband when he failed to return to the house at that time in the evening. Report of the tragedy came as a shock to North Powder people who had known the deceased for years. “Crate” Mann had been a resident of this section for fifty years, coming to this country from his former home at Plainfield, Vermont, at the age of 21. Without finances or other resources other than Yankee thrift and determination, in the fifty years, he accumulated property, mortgages and bonds valued at $200,000. He began life in eastern Oregon as a sheep herder. At the time of his death, he owned some of the best farms in this district and was regarded as one of the wealthiest men in the Powder River valley. Mr. Mann was born in Plainfield, Vermont, December 13, 1856 and came to Oregon in 1877. He worked for ranchers and stock men for a number of years. For several years, with his family, he made his home on his Wolf Creek ranch, now occupied by Leo Mann. Since 1909 he has...

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Washington County, Vermont Census

Washington County was formed as Jefferson County from Addison, Caledonia, Chittenden and Orange counties in 1811. 1820 Washington County, Vermont Census Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1820 Washington County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Washington County, Vermont Census Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1830 Washington County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Washington County, Vermont Census Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1840 Washington County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Washington County, Vermont Census Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Free 1850 Census Images (partially indexed) Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free TrialĀ  1850 Washington County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Free 1850 Census Transcription Barre Township pg 0095b pg 0106b Berlin Township pg 0118b pg 0129b Calais Township pg 0208b pg 0220a Duxbury Township East Montpelier Township pg 0190b pg 0202a Fayston Township Marshfield Township pg 0148b pg 0156b Middlesex Township pg 0250b pg 0261b Montpelier Township pg 0162b pg 0173b pg 0184b Moretown Township...

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Biography of Perley Oscar Folsom

PERLEY OSCAR FOLSOM, active in business and politics at Cushman, Massachusetts, in the town of Amherst, was born in Marshfield, Vermont, March 28, 1882. The name he bears appears first in history in the first half of the fourteenth century. John Foulsham, of Foulsham, was prior of a Carmelite Monastery in Warwick, England. He was a prominent ecclesiastic; and his brother, Richard Foulsham, was even more prominent. The word foule (fowl) signified bird, and the country seat of Foulsham probably took its name from its being the home (ham) of many foules (birds). (I) The first traceable ancestor of the immigrant, John Foulsham, is Roger Foulsham, of Necton, County of Norfolk, England, whose will is dated 1534. (II) William Foulsham, son of Roger Foulsham, married Agnes Smith, alias Foulsham, of Besthorpe. (III) Adam Foulsham, son of William and Agnes (Smith) Foulsham, owned lands in Besthorpe, Wymondham (Windham), Bunwell, Hingham and Hockford. (IV) Adam Foulsham, son of Adam and Emma Foulsham, baptized in 1560, resided in Hingham and owned lands in Besthorpe. He died in 1630. (V) Adam Foulsham, son of Adam and Grace Foulsham, known as Adam of Hingham, died in 1627. His will, made in that year, named three sons, John, Adam and Peter. His wife’s name was Agnes. (VI) John Foulsham, son of Adam and Agnes Foulsham, was baptized in Hingham in 1615. He was the first...

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