Location: Washington County OH

Mission’s Among the Southern Indians

In the year 1819 the Synod of South Carolina resolved to establish a mission among the Southern Indians east of the Mississippi river. The Cherokees, Muskogee’s, Seminoles, Choctaws and Chickasaws then occupied Georgia, Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Rev. David Humphries offered to take charge of the intended mission. He was directed to visit the Indians, obtain their consent and select a suitable location. Rev. T. C. Stewart, then a young licentiate, offered himself as a companion to Mr. Humphries. They first visited the Muskogee’s (Creeks), who, in a council of the Nation, declined their proposition. They then traveled through...

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Biography of Col. Lewis R. Jewell

Various members of the Jewell family have been well known at Fort Scott and vicinity for many years. Both Col. Lewis R. and his son, by the same name, were active, and the father quite prominent, in the days of the Civil war. He came of old Massachusetts lineage, moved to Ohio early in life, and while a resident of Washington County married Susan Hutchinson. Mr. Jewell became interested in river transportation, and when he moved to St. Louis, several years before the war, was the owner of several boats plying the Mississippi and Ohio, and had reached the rank of “Captain.” In 1859 Captain Jewell located in the central strip of Kansas near Arcadia, and there established himself as a farmer and stock-raiser. By the vigorous resistance of settlers, in which he was a leader, the aggressive Cherokecs were barred from the country, but to make their tenure more secure a delegation of the whites was sent to Washington to seek Government backing and to protect the settlement of a large contemplated colony from the East. The captain was one of this delegation, but before anything definite was accomplished the Civil war broke like a sudden storm on the country, and colonization and all else were thrust aside in face of the great danger and disaster. Captain Jewell had been known as a strong democrat, and some had...

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Slave Narrative of Sarah Woods Burke

Interviewer: James Immel Person Interviewed: Sarah Woods Burke Location: Washington County, Ohio Place of Birth: Grayson County, West Virginia Age: 85 “Yessir, I guess you all would call me an ex-slave cause I was born in Grayson County, West Virginia and on a plantation I lived for quite a spell, that is until when I was seven years old when we all moved up here to Washington county.” “My Pappy’s old Mammy was supposed to have been sold into slavery when my Pappy was one month old and some poor white people took him ter raise. We worked for them until he was a growed up man, also ’til they give him his free papers and ‘lowed him to leave the plantation and come up here to the North.” “How did we live on the plantation? Well you see it was like this we lived in a log cabin with the ground for floors and the beds were built against the walls jus’ like bunks. I ‘member that the slaves had a hard time getting food, most times they got just what was left over or whatever the slaveholder wanted to give them so at night they would slip outa their cabins on to the plantation and kill a pig, a sheep or some cattle which they would butcher in the woods and cut up. The wimmin folks would...

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Biography of J.G. Brown

J. G. Brown, son of Captain Benjamin Brown, was born April 16th, 1798, near Waterford, in Washington county, Ohio, and has lived in Athens county since he was one year old. His youth was passed in working on his father’s farm (in Ames township), and in assiduous study and preparation for college. In due time he became a student at the Ohio university, and graduated there in 1822. From 1824 to 1825, he was preceptor in the academical department of the university. In 1825 he began the publication of the Athens Mirror, the first paper printed in the county, and continued as its editor and publisher for five years. From 1827 to 1833, he was county recorder, which office he again filled from 1836 to 1841, when he began the practice of law in Athens. In 1841 he became a member of the board of trustees of the university, which position he still holds. He was a delegate to the convention which formed the present constitution of Ohio, and was for two years president judge of the Athens district. For many years past he has practiced law in Athens. Judge Brown came to Athens county when nearly the whole of its area was an unbroken forest and to the town of Athens when it was a mere cluster of log cabins. The personal friend and associate of the leading...

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Biography of William P. Cutler

William P. Cutler was born near Marietta, July 12, 1813; was a member of the Ohio legislature from 1844 to 1846, officiating as speaker of the house during his last term; was a member of the constitutional convention of 1850; afterwards was for some years president of the Marietta & Cincinnati Railroad Company; was elected in 1860 a representative to the 37th congress, and has been for a few years past again officially connected with the above mentioned railroad. In 1818 Judge Cutler again appeared in public life as a member of the Ohio legislature from Washington county. We regret that we can not exhibit in detail his noble services at this period of his life; we can only state the results. He succeeded in changing the land tax system from a direct tax to an ad valorem basis. Prior to 1824 the whole burden of state taxes was laid on the lands as a direct tax, levied by the acre and without reference to value. Consequently thinly populated counties like Athens and Washington actually paid more into the treasury than wealthy and populous counties like Hamilton and Butler. The system was grossly unequal and oppressive. Judge Cutler’s clear vision enabled him to perceive this, and he labored long and successfully to change it, so that taxes should be assessed on the whole property of the people according to...

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Biography of Dr. Ezra Walker

Doctor Ezra Walker, the first resident physician of Ames township, was born December 9, 1776, at Killingly, Connecticut, in which state he studied his profession, and practiced for some years. Removing from Connecticut he settled in Poultney, Vermont, about the year 1800, and from thence migrated with his family to Marietta, in the autumn of 18 to. He remained on the Muskingum till the spring of 1811, when he came with his family, consisting of wife and seven children, into Ames township, and immediately resumed the practice of medicine. He pursued a general practice for more than twenty years, and, in a few families who would never excuse him, he continued to practice for almost forty years, or till near the close of his life. When he began to practice medicine in the county, and for many years later, what with bad roads or no roads at all, absence of bridges, sparse and scattered settlements, etc., his long rides, frequently of fifteen or twenty miles, were always attended with difficulties and sometimes with dangers. In one instance he had to cross the country from where the present town of Plymouth, Washington county, is situated, to another settlement at Barrows’ mill, in Rome township, which took him till far in the evening, when he found himself followed by wolves. As their numbers increased the animals were emboldened to contract their...

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Biography of Capt. Thomas S. Lovell

Capt. Thomas S. Lovell was born in Barnstable County, Massachusetts, January i8, 1785. At the age of fifteen he went to sea as cabin boy, and, during his first cruise of three years, was advanced before the mast. Returning home he went to school for one or two terms, learned something of navigation and a little mathematics, then took to the sea again. He was successful in his calling, became master of a ship before he was twenty-one years old, and before he had reached his twenty-ninth year had crossed the Atlantic forty-two times. Capt. Lovell says: “In 1812, when war began, I loaded my ship with corn in Philadelphia for a Spanish port, depending on the good sailing of my ship for safety. I went through safely, sold my cargo at a good advance, and lay in the harbor five months, waiting for an opportunity to get out, the bay of Biscay being alive with armed vessels. When I thought it was safe to come out I did so, but myself and crew were captured. My ship was ballasted with sand. The English were very anxious to know what had become of the proceeds of my cargo. I told them I had remitted it to London, but they thought that was a Yankee lie, and they probed the sand through and through to find the money, but to...

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Biography of Rev. Jacob Lindley

The Rev. Jacob Lindley, seventh son of Demas Lindley, one of the early settlers of Washington county, Pennsylvania, was born in that county, June 13, 1774. At the age of eighteen he was sent to Jefferson college, Pennsylvania, and from there went to Princeton, New Jersey, where he graduated in 1798. After a course of theological study he was license] to preach by the ” Washington Presbytery,” and in 1803, he removed to Ohio, settling first at Beverly, on the Muskingum. Having been selected by the first board of trustees of the Ohio university to organize and conduct that institution, he removed to Athens in 1808, and opened the academy there. For several years he had entire charge of the infant college, which he conducted with distinguished ability and success. He was the prime mover in securing the erection of the college buildings, and also in founding the Presbyterian church at Athens. He labored assiduously here for about twenty years, during part of which time he was the only Presbyterian minister in this portion of the state. He returned in 1829 to Pennsylvania, where he spent the rest of his life, and died at the residence of his son, Dr. Lieutellus Lindley, in Connellsville, Pennsylvania, January 29th, 1857. Dr. Lindley was no common man, but an earnest thinker and conscientious worker. The leading trait in his character was an...

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Biographical Sketch of Edward H. Funston

Edward H. Funston, who as a resident of Allen County served in both houses of the Kansas Legislature and a member of the United States Congress, was a native of Clark County, Ohio, born September 16, 1836. He was of Irish descent. Mr. Funston received only a fair education in his earlier years, worked on the farm, taught school and pursued a partial course at Marietta College, Ohio. Later that institution conferred the M. A. degree upon him. In 1861 he entered the Sixteenth Ohio battery and took part in the principal actions along the Mississippi River, until mustered out of the service in 1865. In 1867 Mr. Funston came to Kansas and loested on a prairie farm in Carlyle Township, Allen County. He was elected to the State Legislature in 1873, was re-elected at each of the two succeeding annual elections, and was speaker of the House the last year. In 1880, he was elected to the State Sanate and served as president pro tempore of that body. After four years in the State Senate, he was elected to Congress on March 1, 1884, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Dudley C. Haskell, and was re-elected at each succeeding term until 1892, when he was defcated by a fusion of the democratic and populist parties. He was given the certificate of election, but his seat...

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Biography of James Rowland

James Rowland. More and more as time goes on American people appreciate the sacrifices and heroism of that host of men who preserved the Union in the dark days of the ’60s. It was a wonderful heritage left by them “Much more by far than all the crowns that Europe’s monarchs ever wore, the heritage heroes left a nation free from shore to shore.” Comparatively few of the old veterans of that struggle still survive, and wherever they are found they enjoy increasing respect in proportion to their decreasing numbers. One of them is Mr. James Rowland, whose country home is in section 6 of Harwood Township. Mr. Rowland was born in Washington County, Ohio, the youngest in a family of seven children born to William and Sarah (Chapman) Rowland. His parents’ ancestors came from England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales, and the Rowland family first had its home in the State of Maine and from there came to Ohio. James Rowland was only three weeks of age when his mother died and has was reared in the home of a Mr. Fowler. He acquired an education in the Ohio public schools and at the age of nineteen enlisted to serve his country. The date of his enlistment was May, 1864, and he joined Company H of the One Hundred and Sixty-first Ohio Infantry. He enlisted at Hiramsburg in Noble...

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Biography of C. O. Ross

C. O. Ross. In a conspicuous place on the roll of men who have become successful through their connection with the oil and gas industry is found the name of C. O. Ross, a native of the Buckeye state and a splendid type of the alert, progressive and public-apirited men whose records are indications that success is ambition’s answer. His long and prominent connection with the oil business began at the time of his majority, when he started in at the bottom to make his way to a position of prominence, and no oil producer in Kansas has a better record for high and straightforward business conduct, or for success won with honor. With the exception of six months spent in Colorado he has made Coffeyville his home and the center of his activities since 1907. Mr. Ross was born on a farm in Wesley Township, Bartlett P. O., Washington County, Ohio, January 16, 1875, and is a son of James and Martha (Heald) Ross. Thomas Ross, his grandfather, was born in 1796, in Scotland, and as a young unmarried man came to America, making his way from New York to Virginia, where for some years he was engaged in farming. In later life he removed to Illinois, where he continued in agricultural pursuits until his death in 1876, when he was eighty years of age. With native thrift...

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Biography of R. M. Godfrey

The present judge of Nowata county is R. M. Godfrey, who has been a resident of Nowata since 1914. He was born at Stockport, Ohio, on the 3d of June, 1887, a son of George N. and Effie L. (Scheetz) Godfrey, the former a native of Ohio. The progenitor of the Godfrey family in this country was Daniel Godfrey, who came to America from England at an early day and upon the out-break of the Revolutionary war enlisted for service under George Washington’s command. The paternal great-grandfather, Prince Godfrey, was born in Maine and removed from that state to Ohio in 1821, locating near Stockport, in which community the family resided for many years. His son was Samual B., likewise a native of Maine, who married Catherine Ellison of Ireland. The mother of R. M. Godfrey died in 1894, while his father is still living on the old family farm at Stockport. He is fifty-eight years of age. R. M. Godfrey also has one brother, J. A., who is engaged in the mercantile business in Newark, Ohio. In the acquirement of an education R. M. Godfrey attended the Ohio public schools and after graduating from the high school at Bloomdale, spent three years at Marietta College, taking a general course. Subsequently he took up the study of law in the office of H. L. Pearson at Fayetteville, Arkansas, and...

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Biography of Joseph G. Schofield

One of the prominent attorneys of Checotah is Joseph G. Schofield, who was born in Lowell, Ohio, on the 22d of September, 1847, a son of Joseph C. and Anna (Miller) Schofield. He is of English and colonial ancestry on his father’s side and Scotch-Irish ancestry on the maternal side. The Schofield family in America is descended from Holland Dutch ancestors, the head of the English line having come to England with William of Orange, he being one of the officers who came from the native land to assist in the support of the claims of William and Anne to the English throne. The Schofields in England became manufacturers and the grandfather emigrated from York, England, about the beginning of the preceding century and settled at Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in woolen manufacturing and set up and operated the first spinning jenny ever erected west of the Susquehanna River. He was there united in marriage to Elizabeth Brown. Her father was a well known and prominent merchant and was a soldier in the Revolution, having served with the Colonial troops. In 1828 this couple, with their family, removed to the then far west and settled in what was then Morgan County, now Noble County, Ohio, near Olive, said to be the second oldest town in that state. There the grandfather purchased a farm and a woolen and grain...

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Joel Todd of Marietta OH

Joel Todd7, (Oliver6, Samuel5, Christopher4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born May 12, 1799, died May 1, 1851, married Sept. 23, 1826, Austria Griggs, who was born July 9, 1807, died Aug. 9, 1847. They lived in Marietta, Ohio. Children: *1363. Tertius Samuel, b. March 20, 1828. 1364. Mary Pierpont, b. Feb. 19, 1830, m. March, 1850, John L. Shaw, who was b. June 6, 1809. They lived in Marits, Morrow County, Ohio. 1365. Frances Louisa, b. May 23, 1832, d. Jan. 28, 1843. 1366. Charlotte Elizabeth, b. April 16, 1836, d. May 26, 1843. 1367. Emma Jane, b. July 9, 1838, m. June 1857, Nathan T. Case, who was b. in 1827, they lived in Des Moines, Iowa. 1368. Benjamin Sharock, b. Jan. 28, 1840, d. Aug. 23, 1843. 1369. Adeline Maria, b. April 16, 1843, d. same day. 1370. Le Grand Berks, b. May 23, 1844, d. Oct. 10, 1864, in Carleton, Miss., while serving his country in the war of the rebellion. 1371. Cornelia Austria, b. Jan. 28, 1846, d. in 1863; she lived in Galion, Crawford County,...

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Biography of John P. Harris

John P. Harris. The career of an honorable, dutiful and upright man, a gallant soldier, an able financier and an incumbent of offices high in the state and municipal service is illustrated in the enviable record of the late John P. Harris, of Ottawa, whose death occurred on the 23d of February, 1917. He was a veteran of the Civil war, and served as president of the People’s National Bank, as county treasurer of Franklin County, as state senator of Kansas and as mayor of Ottawa. During the many years of his residence in Franklin County he was constantly identified with the things that combined to make for good government and elevation of business standards, for civic improvement and the advancement of educational and social conditions, and no citizen of Ottawa occupied a higher place in public esteem. Mr. Harris was born in Washington County, Ohio, July 24, 1839, a son of Asa and Elizabeth (Fulcher) Harris. He was educated in his native state and in Franklin County, Kansas, whence he came in young manhood, and was living here when he enlisted, December 1, 1861, to serve three years or during the war, being mustered into the United States service at Osawatomie, on the same day, as a private of Capt. Thomas Bickerton’s company, First Kansas Battery, Volunteer Light Artillery. The first officers of the battery were mustered into...

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