Location: Washington County NE

Davis, Sam – Obituary

Sam Davis, one of Aitkins county’s most progressive farmers, passed away Tuesday night at his farm home a few miles northeast of town. The end came after a long period of illness, the last eight months of which he spent most of the time confined to his bed. Mr. Davis was but 59 years old at the time of his death and during the years he had lived here he had built up one of the most attractive farms in the county. He and Mrs. Davis were among the pioneers in the turkey industry. Their birds had become know in many states of the union for their fine quality. Sam Davis was born 17 November 1881 in Modale, Iowa the son of Richard and Susan Little, Iowa pioneers. He grew to manhood at the place of his birth and on December 31, 1903 he married Bessie Layton at Blair, Nebraska. They made their home in Modale for several years before moving to Aitkin in March 1913. Survivors are Mrs. Davis and four daughters, Mrs. Dale Alton (Velma) of Little Sioux, Iowa; Mrs. Dave LeDoux (Frances, Crosby; Mrs. Kermit Broselle (Wilma) Aitkin; Mrs. Eugene Wallis (Loretta) Little Sioux, Iowa; 3 grandchildren, Bobby Broselle, Leonard LeDoux, Judy Jean Wallis; three brothers, Tom, Mondamin, Iowa, Albert, Hornick, Iowa; William, Modale, Iowa; 2 sisters, Mrs. Kate Wallace, Modale; Mrs. Belle Ferris, Oregon. A...

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Biography of Jesse L. Conant, M. D.

The subject of this sketch is a worthy example of the large class of well read, careful and honorable physicians who are dear to their fellow townsmen wherever their lot may be cast. They are near to the people in sickness and trouble and grow very near to them in all relations of life, and become, many of them, the most influential men in their communities. Doctor Jesse Lyman Conant, mayor and prominent physician and druggist of Genesee, Idaho, was born in Birmingham, Essex County, New York, May 31, 1831, and is descended from an old Norman family which went to the mother country with William the Conqueror. George Conant, who came early to New England and was the friend and rival of Miles Standish, was the progenitor of the family in America. Doctor Conant’s grandfather was born in Berkshire, Massachusetts, and his son, Clark Conant, who was Doctor Conant’s father, was a native of the same town. Clark Conant married Samantha Grandy of Vermont, and moved to Jackson County, Michigan, at a comparatively early date. Thence they removed, in 1878, when somewhat advanced in life, to Los Angeles, California, where Mr. Conant died at the age of ninety-eight, and Mrs. Conant at the age of ninety-six. They were of the highest character and were almost lifelong members of the Baptist church. They had six children, of whom four...

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Biography of William Arnold

WILLIAM ARNOLD. – One of the best known men in northeastern Oregon, capable and upright, a pioneer of the country and one who has faithfully done his part in the development of the same, having met the dangers and hardships and self-denials incident to a life on frontiering in this region in early days, the subject of this article is eminently fitted for representation in this volume, and it is with pleasure that we accord space to him, and we desire to add that in connection with his abilities and courage, he has manifested excellent moral qualities and integrity that is constant and unswerving. William Arnold was born in Washington county, Nebraska, on March 16, 1856, being the son of Ansel and Jenett (Faster) Arnold. The father came to Nebraska as Indian agent in 1854, and also gave some attention to farming in that state. In 1858, he was called hence by the messenger of death, and his remains sleep in St. Joseph, Missouri. We have but little information of our subject until 1877, when he made the trip to the west, landing in Lagrande in that year. The following year he accompanied a drove of cattle to Cheyenne as one of the drivers, and then returned to Oregon. On this trip, while they were crossing the trail near Boise, Idaho, they were attacked by the Indians, and for...

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Biography of Fred B. Skinner

Fred B. Skinner has been in the lumber business for thirty years, a period constituting practically his entire adult life. Most of that time has been spent at Coffeyville and he is now sales manager of the National Sash and Door Company. As to his ancestral record, he represents a colonial branch of the Skinner family that came from England to New York. His grandfather Joseph Skinner was born in New York State June 28, 1814, was reared there, afterwards went to Michigan as a pioneer, and was married in that state January 19, 1837, to Juliatte Bugbee, who was born July 5, 1811, in New York State. Joseph Skinner, who was a farmer, moved from Michigan into the western wilds of Nebraska, and finally retired from his farm and spent his last years in Kansas with his son James in Johnson County, where he died in 1875. His wife died in Nebraska April 4, 1864. A brief record of their children should be given. F. B., born January 15, 1838, served as a soldier in the Civil war, and is now a retired merchant at North Bend, Nebraska. Ellen J., born August 29, 1840, was married September 9, 1857, to William B. Gilson, a farmer at Salem, Oregon. Joseph A., born September 25, 1842, enlisted in the Union army from Nebraska, followed farming as his vocation and died...

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Bull, Rebecca Nelson Frisbee – Obituary

One of Kittitas County’s best beloved pioneers, Mrs. Rebecca N. Bull, passed away Saturday [April 4, 1936] at the Ellensburg General Hospital, following a short illness. She was 80 years of age and had been a resident of this community for almost 60 years, coming here shortly after the Indian uprising. She was a great conversationalist and with her wonderful memory and charming personality entertained her friends with the recounting of many episodes of the early days and her own experiences of pioneer life in this valley. Mrs. Bull was born in Norway, March 1, 1856, and came to America with her parents when she was 14 years old. She was educated in Nebraska and after graduating from the Normal School at Blair, taught in that city for a number of years. Coming to Seattle by way of San Francisco, she taught near what is now Kent, for one year, before following the trails on horseback to reach the Kittitas Valley in 1879. In 1881 she married B. W. Frisbee, one of the first teachers in the valley, who died in 1888. To them two children were born, a son, Leroy W. of Trenton, New Jersey, and daughter, Emma F. Fiermuller, of Rainy River, Ontario. Later Mrs. Frisbee married Walter A. Bull, who died in 1897. To this union two sons were born, Dr. Leland L. Bull of Seattle,...

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