Location: Washington County NC

Thomas Dillard – Will

(23 Sep 1874) In the Name of God, Amen! I, Thomas Dillard, of the County of Washington, in the State of North Carolina, do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament: First, I lend to my wife during her natural life, or widowhood, the whole of my Negroes, except those given by legacy, but in case of her marriage, that the help of said Negroes descend and be divided amongst my children here named: to Ben Dillard, Wennesoppea, Mary Ann, Thomas, Stacy, Martha, Amy, John and Rebecca, and the other part with all the stock and movable at my said wife’s death to be divided equally amongst the aforesaid children. Second, I give and bequeath to my daughter, Elizabeth Anthony, Negro Inda, with her increase. I let her have at the same time and do devise, that is all I do intend for her to have of my estate. Third, I give and bequeath to my son, Benja. Dillard, Negro Piler and Joe, with the Virginia Bond Warrant for one thousand acres of land what I have already delivered to my said son with the Negroes aforesaid, and do declare that to be all that I do intend for him to have of my estate and lands. Fourth, I give to my daughter, Wennesoppea, a Negro called Cloe and one called Spence. Fifth, I give and bequeath...

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Biography of Edward Graham Daves

One evening in the winter of 1891-’92, in the city of Baltimore, I went to Lehman’s Hall to hear George William Curtis deliver an address before the national meeting of the Civil Service Reform Clubs. Among the prominent men on the platform I noticed a tall gentleman of middle age, with a grave and intelligent face, and of a soldierly hearing. This, I was told, was Professor Edward Graham Daves. I had known of him before this on account of his interest in North Carolina history. Both from what I had Beard and what I then saw. I was very favorably impressed. A short time afterwards I met him. I found that my anticipation was realized. He was a man of charming manners, and of the purest ideals. He was an earnest, intelligent student of the past, an untiring worker, a patriotic American, and in the true old Southern sense, a gentleman. The previous facts of his life, as I afterwards learned, were as follows. Professor Daves was a grandson of Major John Daves, of the Revolutionary army, a son of John Pugh Daves, and was born at New Bern, N. C., March 31, 1833. He began Iris studies at the New Berne Academy, and later prepared for college under private instruction on the plantation of his kinsman, Josiah Collins, near Lake Scuppernong, Washington county, N. C. In 1850...

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Machapunga Indians

Machapunga Tribe: Said to mean “bad dust,” or “much dirt,” in the native Algonquian language. Machapunga Connections. The Machapunga belonged to the Algonquian linguistic stock. Machapunga Location. In the present Hyde County and probably also in Washington, Tyrrell and Dare Counties, and part of Beaufort. Machapunga Villages. The only village named is Mattamuskeet (probably on Mattamuskeet Lake in Hyde County). However, we should probably add Secotan on the north bank of Pamlico River in Beaufort County, and perhaps the town of the Bear River Indians. Machapunga History. The Machapunga seem to have embraced the larger part of the descendants of the Secotan, who lived between Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds when the Raleigh colony was established on Roanoke Island (1585-86) though the Pamlico may also have been included under the same head. They were reduced to a single village by 1701, took part with other Indian tribes of the region in the Tuscarora War, and at its close were settled on Mattamuskeet Lake with the Coree. In 1761 a small number were still living in North Carolina, evidently at the same place, and the Rev. Alex. Stewart reported that he had baptized seven Indian and mixed-blood children belonging to the “Attamuskeet, Hatteras, and Roanoke.” On a second visit 2 years later he baptized 21 more. Machapunga Population. The Machapunga are estimated by Mooney (1928) to have numbered 1,200, including some...

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Henry James Spruill

Sergt., Co. 2, E. T. R. Born in Washington County; son of A. G. and Mrs. Mary E. Spruill. Husband of Mrs. Faith Elizabeth Spruill. Entered service Aug. 31, 1918, at Plymouth, N.C. Sent to University, Columbia, S. C. Transferred to Camp Humphrey, Va., then to Quantico, Va. Was instructor at University and taught school at Camp Humphrey, Va. Mustered out at Camp Humphrey Dec. 19,...

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Moye W. Spruill

Corpl., F. A., Btry. B, 30th Div., 113th Regt., F. A. Born in Washington County; son of James A. and Mrs. Nancy K. Spruill. Entered service July, 1917, at Plymouth, N.C. Sent to Camp at Greenville, S. C. Transferred to Camp Merritt and sailed for France June 6, 1918. Fought at St. Mihiel, Argonne, Woevre and all other battles with his battery. Returned to USA June, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va. June,...

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F. M. Sexton

2nd Class Mate (Navy), 6th Marines; of Washington County; son of W. C. and Mrs. Deborah Sexton. Entered service Aug. 8, 1917. Sent to Naval Hospital Aug. 8, 1917. Transferred to League Island. Sailed for Brest. Promoted to rank of 2nd Class Mate. Returned to USA, Hoboken, N. J., July 9, 1918. Mustered out at Hampton...

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Lindsey Swindell

Corpl., Inf., Co. B, 30th Div., 120th Regt.; of Washington County; son of J. D. and Mrs. Delphia Swindell. Entered service May 3, 1917, at Greenville, N.C. Sent to Camp Sevier, S. C., transferred to Camp Merritt. Sailed for France May 12, 1918. Promoted to Corpl. October, 1917. Fought at Ypres, Somme Front, Bellicourt, Busigny. Mustered out at Camp Jackson April 17,...

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J. E. Swain

Private, Q. M. C., Co. 3. Born in Washington County, N.C., Feb. 27, 1898; son of C. F. and Mrs. Lucria Swain. Husband of Mary Swain. Entered the service Dec. 10, 1917, and sent to Ft. Thomas, Ky., and then transferred to Camp Meiggs. Mustered out of the service at Camp No. 22, Rich Col, Va., Dec. 10,...

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John J. Rodgers

1st Class Private, Inf., Co. L, 81st Div., 321st Regt. Born in Washington County; son of T. W. and Mrs. Agnes Rodgers. Husband of Mrs. Bernice Rodgers. Entered service May 28, 1918, at Plymouth, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., transferred to Camp Sevier, from there to Camp Upton. Sailed for France Aug. 20, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne. Landed in USA June 20, 1919, at Newport News, Va. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., June 28,...

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Cicero Jones, Jr.

Quartermaster, 3rd Class, Navy. Born in Washington County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. Cicero Jones, Sr. Husband of Mrs. Nannie Walker Jones. Entered the service July 25, 1917, at Norfolk, Va. Was sent to Hampton Roads, Va. Was on U. S. S. “McNeal.” Transferred to Portsmouth Naval Hospital, then to U. S. S. “Cape May.” Made one trip overseas on transport duty. Mustered out at New York, Feb. 21,...

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William J. Jackson, Jr.

1st Class Private, Co. I, 30th Div., 119th Regt.; of Washington County; son of W. J. and L. V. Jackson. Entered service July 17, 1916, at Plymouth. Sent to Camp Sevier. Transferred to Camp Mills. Sailed for France May 27, 1917. Fought in all engagements with 119th. Seven months on Mexican border. Was transferred to M. T. C.; did duty as dispatch rider. Returned to USA May 6, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., May 17,...

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Harry S. Gurganus

Cook, Med. Corps, 115th Ambulance Co., 29th Div., 104th Sanitary Train; of Washington County; son of C. W. and Mrs. Josephine Gurganus. Entered service July 27, 1917, at Norfolk, Va. Sent to Camp McClellan, Ala. Sailed for France July 16, 1918. Fought at Alsace Front, Meuse-Argonne Offensive, Verdun. Returned to USA May 22, 1919, at Hoboken, N. J. Mustered out at Camp Meade, Md., June 2,...

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Hubert A. Chesson

U. S. N., Fireman 1st Class, of Washington County; son of E. W. and M. E. Chesson. Entered the service at Plymouth, N.C., Feb. 2, 1918, and sent to Norfolk, Va. On U. S. S. McNeal, Mine Sweeper, and U. S. S. Jean. Made two trips overseas. Mustered out of the service Sept. 19, 1919, at Hampton Roads,...

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Hubert B. Bergeron

Private 1st class, Hdqrs. 120th Infantry, 30th Div.; of Washington County; son of J. N. and Mrs. Mamie W. Bergeron. Entered service Sept. 5, 1917, at Spring Hope. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C. Then to Camp Sevier and to Camp Merritt. Sailed to France June 5, 1918. Fought in all engagements with the 120th Infantry. Returned to USA April 14, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, April 17, 1919. His brother, J. Forrest Bergeron, was also in the...

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Clarence E. Ayers

1st Class Private, Q. M. C., Corporal American Headquarters in France; of Washington County; son of E. W. and N. A. Ayres. Entered service August 1, 1918, at Plymouth, N.C. Sent to Ft. Thomas. Transferred to Camp Meiggs, Washington, D. C., then to Camp Merritt, N. J. Sailed for France Sept. 23, 1918. Returned to USA June 30, 1919, at New York. Mustered out at Camp Mills, L. I., July 8,...

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