Location: Washington County MO

The Brickey Family of Prairie du Rocher Illinois

Two years prior to Missouri’s admission into the Union, October 16, 1819, Franklin W. Brickey saw the light of day in Potosi, Missouri. He attended the public schools and at the age of 19 he came to Illinois. In 1838 he started in business at Fort Chartres, supplying steam-boats with wood and general merchandise. Enterprising and with great foresight he became interested in the Red Bud Mill. In 1858 he erected the present mill at Prairie du Rocher, and at that time his property in Fort Chartres had been swept away by high water. He afterwards started the general...

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Biographical Sketch of Esop Lewis

Esop Lewis, a blacksmith, was of English parentage, and lived in the State of New York, from whence he removed to Vermont. The names of his children were Rufus, Benjamin, Eli, Chandis, Salina, and Hannah. Rufus, who was a cooper by trade, married Elizabeth Gilbert, of Connecticut, and moved with his parents to Ohio in 1816. They went from there to Kentucky, and in 1819 they came to Missouri in keel-boats, landing at St. Genevieve. They settled in Washington County, and in 1839 Rufus Lewis, with his wife and son, Enos W., came to Montgomery County. They had three children besides Enos W., viz.: Mary A., George W., and Elizabeth. The latter was married first to Commodore C. Lewis, and after his death she married Joseph Charles. Mary A. and George W. married and settled in Missouri. Enos W. lives in Montgomery County, and is a substantial, well-to-do farmer, fond of fun and frolic, and nearly always has a joke to tell on somebody. He married the widow Cotes, whose maiden name was Nancy...

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Biography of Rev. John Dunbar

Rev. John Dunbar was a missionary to the Pawnes Indians of the West for a period of more than twenty years before he became a resident of Kansas. He spent a little over a year in the territory and, as its first treasurer, assisted in the organization of Brown County. Mr. Dunbar was a native of Palmer, Massachusetts, born March 3, 1804. In 1832 he was graduated at Williams College, and later at the Auburn Theological Seminary. While a student at the latter institution he received an appointment as missionary to the western Indians; was ordained at Ithaca, New York, May 1, 1834, and on the 5th left there, with instructions to cross the Rocky Mountains to the Nez Perces. Upon arriving at St. Louis on the 23d, he learned that the party of traders with whom he was to travel had already left for the West, but was informed at the same time that the Pawnee tribe needed missionaries, and he decided to go there. As soon as possible he reported at the agency at Bellevue, nine miles above the mouth of the Platte River, on the west bank of the Missouri, and began his work as missionary. In September, 1836, he returned to Massachusetts, and while there superintended the printing of a book of seventy-four pages in the Pawnee language. On Jannary 12, 1837, he married Miss...

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Biographical Sketch of Willard Sitton

WILLARD SITTON. Although Oregon County, Missouri, is well known for the energy, enterprise and push of its farmers, Willard Sitton stands at the van in this industry, and has shown much wisdom and good judgment in the conduct of agricultural affairs, and, through his own endeavors, has won an enviable reputation. He is a prominent resident of Johnson Township, this county, and is deservedly ranked among its successful farmers and stockmen. Mr. Sitton was born in Washington County, Missouri, October 14, 1856, and received a fair education in the common schools of the same. His youthful days were spent in assisting his father on the home place and in the mines, and he remained with him until twenty-three years of age, after which he worked at the black-smith’s trade in The Dalles, State of Oregon, and Ventner, Idaho. He was also in Glendale, Mont., two years, engaged in the blacksmith’s trade, but he came East and located in Oregon County, where he embarked in merchandising, with his brother, Capt. J. J. Sitton. Three years later he commenced farming here, on the river, where he now owns 360 acres of land, 160 acres on the river. He also owns a farm on Frederick Creek, and is one of the most enterprising, industrious citizens of the section. In the year 1892 he led to the altar Miss Mittie George, daughter of...

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Biography of D. H. Allison

D. H. ALLISON. There is nothing which adds so much to the pleasure and convenience of the public as a well-stocked, thoroughly appointed and ably managed livery stable. In such connection we make due reference to the livery establishment of Mr. D. H. Allison, whose reputation in that respect, as well as a trainer, is known throughout the length and breadth of the county. Mr. Allison has made his home and carried on business in Van Buren, Carter County, Missouri, for about two years and has met with well-deserved success. He was born at Irondale, Washington County, Missouri, and was reared in Reynolds County, where his parents, James and Nancy (Johnson) Allison, passed the closing scenes of their lives. The father following farming on Block River and was a soldier in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Both parents died in 1870. Their children, eleven in number, were named as follows: Jane; Jesse A.; Bettie; Mattie and Peggie died young; Haney; Mary; John; D. H.; Nancy E. and Charles. Our subject received a good, practical education in the common schools of St. Genevieve County, and assisted in farm work at home until eighteen years of age, when he started out to fight his own way in life. He continued working on farms until twenty-one years of age, and then became part owner of a saw mill. This he...

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Biography of Hon. J. W. McClurg

HON. J. W. McCLURG, ex-governor of the State of Missouri. A man’s life work measures his success, and the man who devotes his powers to the accomplishment of an honorable purpose is to be honored. If a careful study is made of the motives which actuate every man’s life, there is always to be found some object for which he lives. In Hon. J. W. McClurg it seems to have been an ambition to make the best use of his native and acquired powers and to develop in himself a true manhood. A native of St. Louis County, Missouri, he was born February 22, 1818. Son of Joseph and Mary (Brotherton) McClurg and grandson of Joseph McClurg, who came to America during the Irish Rebellion of 1798. He succeeded in making his escape to this country by concealing himself in the hold of a vessel, and his family soon after followed him to America. He was a man of much energy, and a worker in iron, and soon made his way to Pittsburgh, Penn., where he erected the first iron foundry ever put up in the city, and in or near Pittsburgh he passed the remainder of his days. Although he owned a farm, the most of his attention was given to his foundry, and after he had retired the business was continued by his sons. Joseph McClurg, the...

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Biography of Capt. John James Sitton

CAPT. JOHN JAMES SITTON, one of the wealthiest and most influential citizens of Oregon County, Missouri, has been prominently identified with the best interests of the county for many years, and no worthy movement is allowed to fail for want of support on his part. He is now located at Garfield, where he has a fine residence, and where he is highly esteemed. Capt. Sitton was born in Washington County, Missouri, at Palmer, July 5, 1842, and he is the son of Harvey and Martha F. (Wingo) Sitton, natives respectively of South Carolina and Virginia. Harvey Sitton was a young man when he went to Washington County, Missouri, and he there met and married Miss Wingo, who was left an orphan at an early age and who was brought to Missouri by her guardian. She is still living and resides on the old homestead where she has made her home for the past sixty-one years. Mr. Sitton died in 1893, when seventy-seven years of age. All his life he was engaged in farming and mining, and was unusually successful, working in the lead mines in his own interest for twenty years or more. He was of Scotch descent, his ancestors coming to America and settling in South Carolina in 1747 or ’48, on account of political persecuctions. There were three brothers came over from Scotland and they changed the...

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Biography of Hon. Joshua Sholar

HON. JOSHUA SHOLAR. The free country of America affords numberless instances of men who have made their way alone in life, having nothing on which to depend but their own strong arms and a determination to do and to succeed. Such men are always self-reliant, their necessities having taught them that what is done must be done through themselves alone. They are worthy and well qualified to perform what duties they are called upon to discharge and are almost without exception leaders of thought in their community, and lead lives of great usefulness. In considering the gentlemen of this class in Shannon County, the name of Hon. Joshua Sholar suggests itself forcibly, for the reason that he has attained his distinguished position without the backing of family or friends, but has made his way onward and upward in the world by the force of his own talents. Mr. Sholar was born in Washington County, Missouri, January 8, 1845, and is a son of Whitmel and Mary Ann (Neves) Sholar, natives, respectively, of North Carolina and Henry County, Kentucky The parents were married in Washington County, Missouri, whither the mother had come with her parents when quite small, and the father when twenty-four years of age, and here the father died on the 24th of November, 1857, when fifty-six years of age. The mother was born September 6, 1814, and...

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Biography of Robert S. Sutton

ROBERT S. SUTTON. This substantial and extremely well-known citizen of Eminence Township, Shannon County, Missouri, has devoted his life to farming and stockraising, and what he does not know about these two branches of human endeavor is hardly worthy of consideration. He owes his nativity to Washington County, Missouri, where he was born in 1858, a son of William J. and Ellen (McClowney) Sutton, natives of Kentucky and Washington County, Missouri, the birth of the former occurring in 1831. When a boy William J. Sutton came with his parents to Washington County, Missouri, where he married and lived until after the war, when he took up his abode in Shannon County, and here resided for ten or twelve years, after which he returned to Washington County, and there still lives. He has been an industrious, honest and hard-working farmer, and has been successful in the accumulation of a competency. During the war he served over three years as wagon master in the Eighth Missouri Infantry, with Price’s army and was in the Missouri raid. He is now living with his second wife, who was Malinda Highley, by whom he had three children: Ida, wife of Charley Edmonds, of Crystal City, Missouri; Maggie, wife of Charley Lucas, of Washington County, and William. The paternal grand-father, Robert Sutton, came from Kentucky to Washington County, Missouri, in an early day and here...

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Biography of Hon. Orlando B. Ficklin

Hon. Orlando B. Ficklin, attorney at law, Charleston; he was born in Kentucky Dec. 16, 1808, being the son of William and Elizabeth Kenner (Williams) Ficklin, both of Virginia. His early education was obtained in country schools, in Kentucky and Missouri, except about one year, which he spent at Cumberland College, located at Princeton, Caldwell Co., Ky., under the auspices of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. His parents having removed to Potosi, Washington Co., Mo., he commenced the study of law with Henry Shurlds of that place, who was afterward elected to the Circuit Court bench, and at a later period removed to St. Louis and engaged in banking until his death; Mr. Ficklin spent the winter of 1829 and 1830 in the law office of Gen. Robert Farris, of St. Louis; in March, 1830, he was admitted to the bar at Bellville, St. Clair Co., Ill., having been examined by Edward Cowles, then an old and well-established lawyer of that place; from thence he went to McLeansboro, Hamilton Co., Ill., meeting there with Chief Justice William Wilson, who advised him to locate in Mount Carmel, Wabash Co., Ill.; Mr. Ficklin attended the courts of that circuit commencing at Carmi, and when the circuit closed, he located at Mt. Carmel. In 1832, he went to the Black Hawk war in Capt. Elias Jurdon’s Company, and at the organization of the...

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Biography of Austin, Moses

For the information of our readers who are not familiar with the early colonial scheme of settling Texas with American colonists when it was a province of Spain, we will give a short sketch of the man in whose brain it originated and the various causes which led to it. Moses Austin was a native of Connecticut, born at the village of Durham in 1767. When a boy he went to Philadelphia, and in 1787 he married Miss Maria Brown. His brother, Stephen, was then at the head of an important house in Philadelphia, and Moses Austin soon after his marriage took charge of a branch house in Richmond, Virginia. In a few years the brothers purchased Chizzel’s lead mines in Wythe County, Virginia, and Moses Austin took charge of the enterprise. At that place on the 3rd of November 1793, Stephen Fuller Austin, the future colonial empresario of Texas, was born. Two other children lived to maturity and came to Texas, James Brown Austin and Emily M. Austin. James died of yellow fever at New Orleans in August 1829. Emily married twice, first James Bryan, and after his death James F. Perry. In a few years the Philadelphia and Richmond house of the Austins failed, which also involved the loss of the lead mines. At this time reports came of rich lead mines in upper Louisiana (now in...

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Biography of Samuel Henry Melcher

Samuel Henry Melcher is the son of Woodbury Melchor, Esq:, and a grandson of Capt. Samuel B. French, was born in Gilmanton, N. H., October 30, 1828. Was educated at Gilford and Gilmanton academies; graduated at medical department, Dartmouth College, in Grafton county, N, H.; then in Boston, Mass., until 1859, when he traveled South and through Texas; and at the close of that year, settled in Potosi, Washington county, Missouri. On the breaking out of the war, he offered his services at once to Gen. Lyon, at St. Louis arsenal; and was mustered in as assistant surgeon 5th Regt. Mo. Vols. (three months), May 7, 1861. Was with his regiment at the battles of Carthage, July 5, 1861; Dug Spring, August 2, 1861; Wilson’s Creek, August 10, 1861, where he was the last officer on the field after the forces fell back, and brought off the body of Gen. Lyon and delivered it to Gen. Schofield the same night, as narrated on other pages of this volume. By order of Gen. Schofield, he remained a prisoner in the hands of the Confederates, to take care of the Union wounded. Was in Springfield when the “Fremont Body Guard” made their terrific charge, and attended the wounded on both sides; was furnished with wagons by Gen. Sigel, and moved the wounded in all that region to Rolla, thence by rail...

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