Location: Washington County ME

The Settlers of Narraguagus Valley Maine

A glance at the map of the western part of Washington County will show that any treatment of the early settlement upon the Narraguagus River, necessarily involves more or less of the histories of Steuben, Milbridge, Harrington and Cherryfield. Steuben was formerly township “No. 4, East of Union River,” and No. 5 comprised the territory now included in the towns of Milbridge and Harrington. The town of Cherryfield is composed of No. 11, Middle Division, Brigham Purchase, and of the northeastern part of what was formerly Steuben. All that part of Cherryfield lying south of the mills on the...

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Baker Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

Among the very early settlers at Steuben was Lemuel Baker, who came from Roxbury, Mass. He must have come about, or soon after, the time that the Leightons came. He married a Tracy, sister of Mrs. Thomas Leighton, 2d, and Mrs. Deacon Stevens. He settled near the shore of Joy’s Bay, on what is known as Baker’s Point, afterwards near where the George Baker house is. By his first wife he had four children. George, Nabby, Rhoda, and Dolly. After the death of his first wife, which occurred while these children were young, Mr. Baker moved to Massachusetts and there married Abigail Griggs, and by her had two children, Susanna and Eli F., both born in Roxbury, and while they were young again moved to Steuben, where Lemuel and Abigail lived for the remainder of their days.

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Lovett Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

Isaac Lovett, a young Englishman, came to this river with Joseph and Benjamin Wallace. He was clerk and bookkeeper for Major Joseph for several years. He was a fine penman, as shown by the old books that he kept, some of which are yet in existence, and a man of considerable education. He married Annie Sawyer, daughter of John Sawyer of Jonesport. Their children were Daniel, Annie, Rebecca, Ruth, Elizabeth, Jane and Mary.

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Sawyer Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

Josiah Sawyer, about 1757, came from Cape Elizabeth and settled near the river in what is now Milbridge Maine. His wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Jesse Brown. There were born to them four sons and four daughters, Josiah, Jr., William, George B., John, Lydia, Sally, Jane and Hannah.

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Wakefield Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

Samuel Wakefield and his wife Mary Burbank, came from Kennebunk in 1756 or 57, and settled at the head of the bay on the lot now comprising a considerable part of Steuben village. Their children were Samuel, Lydia, Ruth, Benjamin, Phebe, Hannah and Sally. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Wakefield m. a widow Small, and their children were James, Myriam and Daniel.

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Foster Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

The Fosters of Milbridge, Cherryfield, Sullivan, etc., are descended from a Mr. John Foster, who, with his wife, came to the Narraguagus river valley from Cape Elizabeth soon after the close of the Revolutionary War. He and his wife were English born; came to Halifax, thence to Cape Elizabeth and thence here. He had three sons, James, Robert and John.

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Campbell Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

Some time between 1766 and 1768, Alexander Campbell removed from Damariscotta to Steuben, and built a mill at Tunk, now called Smithville, on the east side of the river. It was the first mill there. In 1759, he married Betsey Nickels, who was born in Ireland and came to Lynn, Mass., with her parents when about six years old. From Lynn, she came with her brother, Capt. William. Nickels, to Damariscotta. Children of Alexander and Betsey Campbell were: James, Frances, Hannah, Peggy, Polly, William, Samuel, Alexander, and Betsey.

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Leighton Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

About 1760, two brothers, Thomas and Samuel Leighton, came from Falmouth to this River. Samuel settled on the lot now in possession of Richard P. Willey. His sons were Theodore Leighton, Isaac Leighton, Parritt Leighton and Phineas Leighton. Thomas Leighton, the brother of Samuel Leighton, settled upon a lot at the head of Pigeon Hill Bay. He had a family of six sons and five daughters. Robert, Joseph, Thomas, Annie, Molly, James, Ross, Abigail, Betsey, Sarah and Benjamin. Nearly at the same time that Thomas and Samuel Leighton came and settled, Thomas Leighton 2d came from Dover, N. H., to Gouldsboro. His wife was Lydia Tracy. It is not known that there was any relationship between these two Thomas Leightons. From Gouldsboro, Thomas 2d soon removed to Steuben and settled upon the lot afterwards known as the Henry Leighton lot. He had ten children, Jonathan, Mark, Charity, Alexander, Hatevil, Pamelia, Isaiah, Daniel, Israel and Asa.

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Biography of Hon. Charles T. Stiles

HON. CHARLES T. STILES. – One who has enjoyed the advantages of education, and has been the recipient of wealth left him by fond and indulgent parents, is surely worthy of the encomiums due to success thereby attained. but how much more so is the one who, without this pedestal of fame and fortune, attains an equal eminence by his own un-aided exertions. As an example of this latter career, there was none more notable than the gentleman whose name appears above, whose late untimely demise has removed from the scene of activity one of our most valuable and honored representative men. Briefly stated, the course of his life is as follows: He was a native of Whitneyville, Maine, having been born in that state June 16, 1847. In 1860, when he was bur thirteen years of age, he came with his mother to the Pacific coast to join his father, who had crossed the plains into California in 1849, whom they found at Vancouver, Washington Territory, having located a Donation claim of nine hundred acres near Washougal. The subject of this sketch resided there until 1877, when he moved to Portland, Oregon, his father having died in 1873. In Portland he speculated in produce of every kind until July, 1878, when he removed to Columbia County, Washington Territory, and located in Pataha City, which is now in Garfield...

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Biography of Hon. Eugene D. Smith

HON. EUGENE D. SMITH. – This pioneer of the logging business of the Snohomish river, a portrait of whom is placed in this history, is a representative man of the Puget Sound country, and almost a typical American. Of large and fine proportions physically, self-reliant, capable of taking a hand at any business, even at politics or war, or, with a little brushing up, at almost any profession, he at present contents himself with being proprietor and patron of the handsome town of Lowell, Washington, and conducting large logging operations, on his own estate of four thousand acres in Snohomish county. He was born in Maine on April 30, 1837. While but a child of eight he suffered the loss of his father at Marshfield, Maine, and two years later began the battle of life for himself. Six years a sailor on the high seas, at the age of twenty-one he was commander of a brig. In 1858 he left that situation and came via the Isthmus to San Francisco, sailing on the well-known old steamer Oriflamme and Golden Gate; and by the autumn of that year he had drifted up to the haven of all Maine men, Puget Sound. At Port Gamble he found employment in a logging camp, but in 1862 tried his luck in the Caribou mines. This venture was quickly found non-productive; and in 1863...

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Biography of Meserve M. Getchell

The popular postmaster of Silver City and one of the proprietors of the Idaho Hotel of that place is Mr. Getchell, who was born at Baring, Maine, January 5, 1868. His ancestors were natives of Wales, who emigrated to this country at an early day. His great-great-grandfather, Benjamin Getchell, was born February 4, 1753, married Mehitable Meserve and moved to St. Stephens, New Brunswick. He assisted in the capture of the English schooner Diligence and her armed cutter Tatmagouch July 14, 1775, being a volunteer in Captain John Preble’s company, the colonel of the company being John Allen. The great-grandfather, Joseph Getchell, and his son of the same name, fought in the Revolutionary war and were members of the volunteer crew on the sloop Unity, which, under the command of Captain Jeremiah O’Brien, captured the English armed schooner Margaretta, June 12, 1775. The grandfather of our subject, Daniel Getchell, was born in St. Stephens, New Brunswick, January 24, 1785, and married Miss Elizabeth Grimmer, who was born May 6, 1806. He died January 10, 1876. Their son, Asher B. Getchell, the father of our subject, was born at St. James Mills, New Brunswick, September 3, 1829. When he was ten years old he removed to Baring, Maine, where he grew to manhood and married Miss Julia F. Smith, a daughter of Dr. S. M. and Mary Ellen (Nickerson) Smith...

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Biographical Sketch of Amos Stiles

Amos Stiles, retired, San Bernardino, was born in Kennebec, Maine, in 1823. His father, Israel Stiles, a farmer, moved to the northern part of New Brunswick. In 1843 the subject of this sketch went to Ohio, where he remained four years, and then returned to New Brunswick, where he remained until 1819. He was married in Nova Scotia, in 1849, to Miss Rebecca O’Brien, and soon after his marriage he moved to Utah, where he lived four years. In 1860 he left with teams for California, and arrived in San Bernardino in December of the same year. Here he bought land and engaged in general farming and stock raising, in which he has continued until quite recently. He is now practically retired and enjoying the labor of his hands. He has reared four children, viz.: Rebecca, now Mrs. Ephraim Beardsley; Edward, William E., and Rose, wife of Eli Sparks. Mr. Stiles is a man of education. He attended the Academy at Farmington, Ohio, and taught school for several terms. Religiously, he is a Free-thinker or...

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Passamaquoddy Tribe

Passamaquoddy Indians (Peskěděmakâdi ‘plenty of pollock.’) A small tribe belonging to the Abnaki confederacy, but speaking nearly the same dialect as the Malecite.  They formerly occupied all the region about Passamaquoddy bay and on the St. Croix river and Schoodic lake, on the boundary between Maine and New Brunswick.  Their principal village was Gunasquamekook, on the site of St Andrews, N.B.  They were restricted by the pressure of the white settlements, and in 1866 were settled chiefly at Sebaik, near Perry, on the south side of the bay, and on Lewis Island.  They had other villages at Calais, on Schoodic lake in Washington county, Maine and on St. Croix river in New Brunswick. They were estimated at about 150 in 1726, 130 in 1804, 379 in 1825, and from 400 to 500 in 1859. The Passamaquoddy and Penobscot tribes send to the Maine legislature a representative who is permitted to speak only on matters connected with the affairs of the Indian reservations 1Prince in Proc. Am. Philos. Soc XXXVI, 481, 1897.  See Abnaki Footnotes:   [ + ] 1. ↩ Prince in Proc. Am. Philos. Soc XXXVI, 481,...

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