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Location: Washington County KY

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

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Biographical Sketch of Charles B. Worland

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Charles B. Worland, of Maryland, married Martha A. White, and settled in Washington Co., Ky. Their children were Benedict. Charles B., Thomas N., Maria, William T., John H., Stephen W., Edward H., James P., and Martha A. Mr. Worland, his wife, and a portion of their family settled in Montgomery County in 1839. They are excellent people; honest, industrious, intelligent, kind-hearted and...

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Slave Narrative of John Rudd

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Lauana Creel Person Interviewed: John Rudd Location: Evansville, Indiana Place of Birth: Springfield, Kentucky Date of Birth: December 25, 1854 Age: 83 Ex-Slave Stories District #5 Vanderburgh County Lauana Creel TOLD BY JOHN RUDD, AN EX-SLAVE “Yes, I was a slave,” said John Rudd, “And I’ll say this to the whole world, Slavery was the worst curse ever visited on the people of the United States.” John Rudd is a negro, dark and swarthy as to complexion but his nose is straight and aqualine, for his mother-was half Indian. The memory of his mother, Liza Rudd, is sacred to John Rudd today and her many disadvantages are still a source of grief to the old man of 83 years. John Rudd was born on Christmas day 1854 in the home of Benjamin Simms, at Springfield, Kentucky. The mother of the young child was house maid for mistress Simms and Uncle John remembers that mother and child received only the kindliest consideration from all members of the Simms family. While John was yet a small boy Benjamin Simms died and the Simms slaves were auctioned to the highest bidders. “If’n you wants to know what unhappiness means,” said Uncle John Rudd, “Jess’n you stand on the Slave Block and hear the Auctioneer’s voice selling you away...

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Slave Narrative of Mary Wooldridge

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Mamie Hanberry Person Interviewed: Mary Wooldridge Location: Hopkinsville, Kentucky Place of Birth: Washington County, Kentucky, Age: (about) 103 Place of Residence: Clarksville, Pike R.R. #1, Hopkinsville, Kentucky “Mary and her twin sister were slaves born in Washington County, Kentucky, near Lexington, belonging to Bob Eaglin. When Mary was about fourteen years old she and her sister was brought to the Lexington slave market and sold and a Mr. Lewis Burns of the same County purchased her. Mary doesn’t know what became of her sister. Five or six years later she was again put on the block and sold to a Negro Trader but Mary does not remember this traders name. While here she was kept in a stockade and it was several years before she again was bought by a white man. Mr. Thomas McElroy near Lexington bought her and she remained his slave until the slaves were freed. Mary looks her age. She is a tall gaunt black Negro with white hair about one inch long and very kinky, and still she dresses as the older slave woman dressed in the past days. She wears an old bodice with a very full skirt that comes to her ankles and this skirt has very long deep pockets and when I asked her why she had...

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Washington County, Kentucky Census Records

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now 1790 Washington County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Washington County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Washington County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Washington County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Washington County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Washington County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1830 Washington County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Washington County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1840 Washington County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Washington County, Kentucky Census Records Hosted at Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1850 Washington County, Kentucky Census...

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Biography of William W. Graves

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now William W. Graves. It is as a publisher, author and editor that William W. Graves has made his mark in Kansas. Until he was about twenty-two years of age he had concerned himself with the business of getting an education, working in his father’s store at St. Paul, Kansas, and with teaching. Then came his decision to learn the printer’s trade. The publishers of the Pittsburg World expressed a willingness to “take him on” as an apprentice, allowing him to work as hard as he pleased, but he was to receive no wages at the first and was to board himself. He stuck to his resolutions, completed the contract, and then his name was entered upon the payroll. The Pittsburg World was a daily paper, but in 1893 it was moved from Pittsburg to Girard, Kansas, and Mr. Graves went along with it as local editor. The World suspended publication in 1895, and that was the first jolt Mr. Graves had sustained in his ambitions as a newspaper man. The first day of January, 1896, found him connected with the Neosho County Journal, a weekly published at St. Paul and owned by the Fitzsimmons Brothers. He had acquired a one-fourth interest, but in August of the same year he purchased the rest of the stock and...

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