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Location: Washington County AR

The Cherokee Revolt – Indian Wars

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now From the removal of the Cherokee Indians from Georgia and Tennessee to Arkansas and their establishment upon the reservation allotted to them by treaty with the Government in Arkansas, they have, until the period of this outbreak to the narrative of which this chapter is devoted, been considered as among the least dangerous and most peaceable of the tribes in that region. But through various causes, chief among which has been notably the introduction among them of a horde of those pests of the West the border ruffians; these half wild, half-breed Nomads were encouraged by these Indians, as it appeared, for the sake of the liquor traffic. According to the official accounts of this attempt to reopen hostilities, it appears that on the 11th of April, 1872, it originated with a man named J. J. Kesterson, living in the Cherokee nation, near the Arkansas line, about fifty miles from Little Rock. On that day he went to Little Rock, and filed information against one Proctor, also a white man, married to a Cherokee woman, for assaulting with intent to kill him while in his saw mill, on the 13th of February. Proctor fired a revolver at Kesterson, the ball striking him just above the left eye, but before he could fire again Kesterson escaped. Proctor, at the...

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Biography of Thomas Jones

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now THOMAS JONES. – It is a noted principle, that in the degree in which one is called to endure hardship and successfully surmounts all obstacles and triumphs over every opposition, in that degree is his character strengthened and his forces of real manhood brought out. May it not be that because of the application of this principle, we have in so many of the early pioneers of this wealthy county, such fine specimens of genuine manhood and especially developed in the virtues mentioned. Well known among this worthy number is the esteemed gentleman, whose name initiates this paragraph, and who has surely done a noble part in enduring the woes of humanity and is developing the resources of the county, while he has ever manifested in the long years of his residence here a commendable exemplication of the Christian character and the sagacity and ability with which he is endowed. In Cocke county, Tennessee, on September 12, 1827, Thomas Jones was born to Russell and Sarah (Hayes) Jones. The father died when Thomas was yet very small and so he never knew the wise guiding of a father’s counsel. He passed the years of his minority on the farm and in attending school as he had opportunity, until he was twenty-three years of age. At that...

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Slave Narrative of Aunt Adeline

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now “I was born a slave about 1848, in Hickmon County, Tennessee,” said Aunt Adeline who lives as care taker in a house at 101 Rock Street, Fayetteville, Arkansas, which is owned by the Blakely-Hudgens estate. Aunt Adeline has been a slave and a servant in five generations of the Parks family. Her mother, Liza, with a group of five Negroes, was sold into slavery to John P.A. Parks, in Tennessee, about 1840. “When my mother’s master come to Arkansas about 1849, looking for a country residence, he bought what was known as the old Kidd place on the Old Wire Road, which was one of the Stage Coach stops. I was about one year old when we came. We had a big house and many times passengers would stay several days and wait for the next stage to come by. It was then that I earned my first money. I must have been about six or seven years old. One of Mr. Parks’ daughters was about one and a half years older than I was. We had a play house back of the fireplace chimney. We didn’t have many toys; maybe a doll made of a corn cob, with a dress made from scraps and a head made from a roll of scraps. We were playing...

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Biography of Mrs. Ada C. Foreman

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Foreman and Riley) -Reverend Stephen Foreman was born October 22, 1807, married March 27, 1834, Sallie W. Riley. He was ordained a Presbyterian Minister September 25, 1835; and was elected Justice of the Supreme Court of the Cherokee Nation, October 11, 18.44; Executive Councilor in 1847 and 1855 and was clerk of the Senate in 1867. Mrs. Foreman died August 6, 1861; and he died December 8, 1881. They were the parents of Stephen Taylor Foreman, born at Park Hill September 24, 1848; and married April 28, 1874 Ada Carter, daughter of Sarah and White McClellan, born at Cane Hill, Arkansas on October 25, 1853. He died January t, 1891. Mrs. Foreman is now a resident of Claremore, Oklahoma. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor Foreman were the parents of Sarah Lula, who married John Gunter Lipe; Jennie McClelland, who married David Jesse Faulkner; Ada Laura; Victoria Lipe, who married Stephenson Kennedy; Taylor Worcester and Perry Ashbrook Foreman. Ada Laura and Perry Ashbrook Foreman are now deceased. Taylor Worcester Foreman was born near Oowala, Cooweescoowee District on July 6, 1888; was educated at Oowala and the Male Seminary. He enlisted in the U. S. Army as a private in 1909; was commissioned Captain of Infantry August 15, 1917 and assigned to the 327th Field Artillery, detailed as...

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Biographical Sketch of Herbert W. Hicks

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Foreman)-Abijah Hicks, born March 2, 1819, married Jan. 30, 1852, Hannah Worcester, born January 29, 1834 in New Echota, Georgia. He died June 4, 1862. Mrs. Hannah Hicks died Feb. 3, 1917. They were the parents of Percy W., Emma L, Edith H., Clara A. and Herbert Worcester Hicks. Percy W. married Elms Garrett and lives at Fort Gibson. Edith married Charles W. Smith and Richard 111. Walker. Clara A. married Nicholas McNair Thornton and George I. Hopson. Herbert Worcester Hicks was born at Park Hill May 18, 1861; and married at Fayetteville, Arkansas, on December 23, 1886, Rachel, the daughter of James and Sarah Cardwell, who was born July 20, 1869, in Washington County, Arkansas. They are the parents of Ethel Inez, born December 24, 1889; Homer Wilton, born October 22, 1891; Clifton A., born November 16, 1894; Vera Clare, born Oct. 14, 1896 died Nov. 28, 1900; Ralph Connor, born March 30, 1903, and Herbert Morris, born June 3, 1907. Ethel Inez married A. M. Buster, and Homer Wilton married Ferrel Thompson. Mr. Hicks Cherokee name is E-no-li. His mother was a daughter of Reverend Samuel A. Worcester, one of the first Missionaries to the Cherokees, coming with them from Tennessee and Georgia, in 1838; his father was a descendant of Charles Hicks,...

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Slave Narrative of R. C. Smith

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: R. C. Smith Occupation: Prophet One morning in May I heard a poor rebel say; “The federal’s a home guard Dat called me from home…” I wish I was a merchant And could write a fine hand, I’d write my love a letter So she would understand. I wish I had a drink of brandy, And a drink of wine, To drink wid dat sweet gal How I wish dat she was mine. If I had a drink of brandy No longer would I roam, I’d drink it wid dat gal of mine Dat wishes me back home. I’ve heard the soldiers sing that song a heap of times. They sung it kind of lonesome like and I guess it sort of made them home sick to sing it. Us niggers learned to sing it and it is about the only one I can sing yet. I remembers the words to another one we used to sing but I’ve forgot the tune but the words go like this: Old man, old man Your hair is getting gray, I’d foller you ten thousand miles To hear your banjo play. I never was much at singing though. I guess my voice is just about wore out just like my body. I’ve always had good health and...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel C. Blake

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Blake, Samuel C. (See Downing, Gore)— Samuel Coke Blake, born at Cane Hill, Wash­ington, Washington Co. Ark. April 10, 1862, educated in that county. Married at Wagon­er, June 10, 1888, Georgia Anna Pharris, born Oct. 5, 1867 at Petaluma, Calif. They are the parents of: Jennie Agnes, born August 23, 1889, married Charles E. Stamps; Nita Emory, born February 11, 1892, mar­ried Charles Alonzo Spencer and has two children, Myrtle Caroline, horn February 5, 191 1 and Alonzo Blake Spencer, born March 24, 1919; John Fenlon, born September 4, 1894; Albert Watts, horn May 17, 1897; Georgia Kezzie, born April 18, 1900, mar­ried October 24, 1919, Clifford Moore and has one son, Samuel Marion Moore, born December 17, 1920; Mabel Heber, born No­vember 23, 1903; Hester Keep, born January 30, 1906 and Ruby Opal Blake, born Novem­ber 2, 1909. Samuel Blake, born January 5, 1818, in Ryde, Isle of Wright, England, and married Martha Jane Pyratt who was born in 1824. She died in 1914 and Samuel Blake died in 1878. They were the parents of Samuel Coke Blake. James and Kate (Finley) Pyratt, natives of North Carolina, settled thirteen miles west of Little Rock, Arkan­sas, in 1812, and moved to Cane Hill, Washington County, Arkansas, 1827. Since that time the Pyratt’s have been socially prominent...

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Biographical Sketch of Dr. J. H. Gainer

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Ghigau and Oolootsa)-Cynthia, daughter of Thomas Jefferson and Jennie (Taylor) Pack, married Daniel Harmon and they were the parents of Emma Henrietta, Jennie, Laura, Elizabeth, McGilbra, Benjamin Franklin, and Lena Modesta Harmon. Lena Modesta Harmon was born October 23, 1885, and married Dr. John Harris Games, born April 29, 1870 in Washington County, Arkansas. He graduated from the Memphis Hospital Medical College in 1906, and is at present practicing medicine at Warner, Oklahoma. They are the parents of Daniel Benjamin, born September 26, 1910; Helen Elizabeth, born September 8, 1912 and Dorothy Gaines, born April 28, 1916. Gaines was Court Clerk of Muskogee from 1917 to...

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Biography of Robert M. Divin

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now This venerable citizen and esteemed gentleman and resident of Vale is one of the substantial men of Malheur County and is well and favorably known throughout the precincts of this region, being a man of stanch integrity, and always manifesting those qualities of worth and merit that redound to the good of all. Mr. Divin was born in Lincoln County, Tennessee, on December 17, 1831, being the son of Irbin F. and Hannah Divin. The father died when our subject was two years of age, having removed with the family to Washington County, Arkansas, where the death occurred. There were but few settlers in that section then, and there Robert M. lived and attended school in the rough log houses of the time, gaining a training there from which fortified him for the battle of life. He remained with his mother until he had reached the age of manhood, and in 151 he married Miss Mary J. Kellam, a native of Little Rock, Arkansas. He was occupied on a farm until 186o, then removed to the frontier of Texas among the savage Commanche Indians. Here Mr. Divin and his family endured hardships and deprivations and sufferings from the savages that are calculated to dry up the cup of joy from the human breast, but they bravely...

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Biography of Henry W. Hermann, M.D

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Dr. Henry W. Hermann, who has attained prominence in the field of neurology, was born on the 9th of June, 1855, at Hermansburg, Washington county, Arkansas, and is a son of Charles F. and Lena D. (Wilhelmi) Hermann. According to a genealogical record printed by C. F. Hermann, the first date mentioned in connection with the family in America is 1650. In a volume entitled Founders of Harman’s Station, Kentucky, it appears that one Heinrich Hermann from the same family reached America about the year 1700, penetrated as far west as the Mississippi river, and was celebrated as an Indian fighter. During the Revolutionary war his sons fought the British who had incited the Indians to make war upon the early settlers. The Wilhelmi genealogy dates back to 1525, naming a minister, the builder of a beautiful pulpit at Elprincen, Westphalia. The eldest son in this family has been a minister for nine generations and the father of Lena D. Wilhelmi also devoted his life to that holy calling. Charles F. Hermann left his home at Mannheim, Germany, in 1848 after the failure of the revolution when liberty loving men sought to establish a republic. Unsuccessful in this attempt he resolved to emigrate to America and enjoy the advantages, opportunities and liberties of the new world....

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Biography of Allan Arthur Gilbert, M.D.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Dr. Allan Arthur Gilbert, an internist of St. Louis, who in his practice has gained high professional standing, was born in Burrton, Kansas, May 26, 1890, a son of the Rev. H. M. Gilbert, who was born in South Carolina, but was descended from one of the old families of Connecticut of English lineage. The progenitor of the family in the new world was Mathew Gilbert, who came across the Atlantic on the historic Mayflower and was the first deputy governor of Connecticut under King George. Among the ancestors of Dr. Gilbert was also Colonel Ethan Allen, who commanded the famous Green Mountain boys in the Revolutionary war. Rev. H. M. Gilbert was a graduate of Vanderbilt University, attending the Theological Seminary and also was gradauted from Wafford College. He received his Doctor of Divinity degree from Vanderbilt and devoted his entire life to the ministry of the Presbyterian church. He is now a representative of the Presbyterian Board of Ministerial Relief and resides in St. Louis, but has his business headquarters in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He married Clara Elizabeth Fulton, a native of Illinois. Her father was Isaac B. Fulton, a pioneer of that state and also of Kansas and after removing to the west be served as a member of the state legislature of Kansas...

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Biography of Frank Pace

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now FRANK PACE is one of the youngest, but none the less one of the ablest, attorneys of northwest Arkansas. He has improved every opportunity for gaining knowledge and has availed himself of every chance for the betterment of his condition and reputation, and more than this cannot be said of the most successful man who has ever lived. He owes his nativity to Boone County, Arkansas, born here, he first saw the light July 25, 1871, being a son of the well-known attorney, Capt. W. F. Pace. Frank Pace, after receiving his initiatory training in the public schools of his native county, finished his education in the State University at Fayetteville, Arkansas, which institution he left at the age of sixteen, while in his junior year, and at once took up the study of law with his father, in Harrison, and on the day he was nineteen years old he was admitted to the bar. He at once began practicing in Harrison, but after a short time located in Yellville, where he has since been located and where he has built up an exceptionally large practice, in fact one of the largest in that section of the State. He is also the leading attorney of the county, is keen, shrewd and quick-witted, and presents his cases...

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Biography of Isaac H. A. Daniel

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now ISAAC H. A. DANIEL, a Union soldier during the Civil War, and now a prominent farmer and stockraiser of Washington Township, Stone County, Missouri, Isaac H. A. Daniel is a native of Franklin County, Tennessee, where he was born September 30, 1830. He is a son of Reuben and Susan (Watts) Daniel, natives of North Carolina and Franklin County, Tennessee, respectively. When a boy Reuben Daniel went with his parents from Georgia to Franklin County, Tennessee, and there he grew to manhood and was married. About 1839 he moved to Wayne County, Tennessee, and then to Washington County, Ark, where he died in April, 1863. He was a soldier in the First Arkansas United States Army, but was home on a furlough at the time of his death. His entire life was passed in agricultural pursuits. His father, Job Daniel, was probably born in England, and was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. His death occurred in Franklin County, Tennessee. Our subject was but four years old at the time of his father’s death and there were seven children left fatherless. The mother died in 1891, when about eighty-one years of age, her death occurring in Stone County. She was the daughter of Robert Watts, who was a drum-major and was killed at the battle of...

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Biography of Charles Proctor

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Charles Proctor. The men who came in the early days to Kansas and stuck to their posts in spite of discouragements and setbacks, have with few exceptions gained all the prosperity that a man of ordinary ambition could erave. Such men possessed character as well as the ability to do hard work, and it is not strange that many of the public honors have been given to such citizens. One of this class in Cloud County is Mr. Charles Prostor of Miltonvale. He had lived a long and useful life and is now past fourscore. His years have ripened his judgment, and through all his experiences and relationships he had maintained unsullied a reputation for integrity of character. He was selected by the citizens of Miltonvale and adjacent territory to various offices of trust and responsibility and gave conscientious exactness to every public performance. From 1888 to 1892 he served Cloud County as county clerk for two terms. He was county commissioner one term and on the school board several terms. He established a postoffice one-half mile west of what is now Miltonvale, where he was postmaster until resigning the office to R. T. Modrell. Mr. Proctor was elected the first president of the Home State and now the Drovers State Bank of Miltonvale, and he was succeeded in that position...

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Slave Narrative of Miss Adeline Blakeley

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Mary D. Hudgins Person Interviewed: Miss Adeline Blakely Age: 87 Home: 101 Rock Street, Fayetteville, Arkansas “Honey, look in the bible to get the date when I was born. We want to have it just right. Yes, here’s the place, read it to me. July 10, 1850? Yes, I remember now, that’s what they’ve always told me. I wanted to be sure, though. I was born in Hickman County, Tenn. and was about a year when they brought me to Arkansas. My mother and her people had been bought by Mr. John P. Parks when they were just children—John and Leanna and Martha. I was the first little negro in the Parks kitchen. From the first they made a pet out of me. I was little like a doll and they treated me like a plaything—spoiled me—rotten. After Mr. Parks came to Arkansas he lived near what is now Prairie Grove, but what do you think it was called then—Hog Eye. Later on they named it Hillingsley for a man who settled there. We were two miles out on the Wire Road, the one the telegraph line came in on, Honey. Almost every conmunity had a ‘Wire Road’. It was the custom to give a girl a slave when she was married. When Miss Parks...

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