Location: Warren County NC

Slave Narrative of Mary Anngady

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Mary Anngady Location: 1110 Oakwood Avenue, Raleigh, North Carolina Age: 80 (Princess Quango Hennadonah Perceriah) 1110 Oakwood Avenue, Raleigh, North Carolina. I was eighteen years old in 1875 but I wanted to get married so I gave my age as nineteen. I wish I could recall some of the ole days when I was with my missus in Orange County, playing with my brothers and other slave children. I was owned by Mr. Franklin Davis and my madam was Mrs. Bettie Davis. I and my brother used to scratch her feet and rub them for her; you know how old folks like to have their feet rubbed. My brother and I used to scrap over who should scratch and rub her feet. She would laugh and tell us not to do that way that she loved us both. Sometimes she let me sleep at her feet at night. She was plenty good to all of the slaves. Her daughter Sallie taught me my A B C’s in Webster’s Blue Back spelling Book. When I learned to Spell B-a-k-e-r, Baker, I thought that was something. The next word I felt proud to spell was s-h-a-d-y, shady, the next l-a-d-y, lady. I would spell them out loud as I picked up chips in the yard to build a fire with. My missus Bettie gave me...

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Slave Narrative of Clay Bobbit

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Clay Bobbit Date of Interview: May 27, 1937 Location: S. Harrington Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Place of Birth: Warren County NC Date of Birth: May 2, 1937 Age: 100 An interview with Clay Bobbit, 100 of S. Harrington Street, Raleigh, N. C., May 27, 1937. I wuz borned May 2, 1837 in Warren County to Washington an’ Delisia Bobbit. Our Marster wuz named Richard Bobbit, but we all calls him Massa Dick. Massa Dick ain’t good ter us, an’ on my arm hyar, jist above de elbow am a big scar dis day whar he whupped me wid a cowhide. He ain’t whupped me fer nothin’ ‘cept dat I is a nigger. I had a whole heap of dem whuppin’s, mostly case I won’t obey his orders an’ I’se seed slaves beat ‘most ter deff. I wuz married onct ‘fore de war by de broom stick ceremony, lak all de rest of de slaves wuz but shucks dey sold away my wife ‘fore we’d been married a year an’ den de war come on. I had one brother, Henry who am wuckin’ fer de city, an’ one sister what wuz named Deliah. She been daid dese many years now. Massa Dick owned a powerful big plantation an’ ober a hundert slaves, an’ we wucked on short rations an’ went nigh naked. We ain’t...

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Slave Narrative of Jerry Davis

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Jerry Davis Location: 228 E. South Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Place of Birth: Warren County NC Age: 74 Jerry Davis Ex-Slave Story and Folk Tale An interview with Jerry Davis 74 of 228 E. South Street, Raleigh, North Carolina. I wus borned in Warren County ter Mataldia an’ Jordan Davis. Dere wus twenty-two o’ us chilluns, an’ natu’ally Marster Sam Davis laked my mammy an’ daddy. He owned two hundert an’ sebenty slaves, an’ three, four, or five scopes o’ lan’. Marster wus good ter us, he gibe us plenty ter eat, an’ w’ar, an’ he wus good an’ kind in his talkin’. I warn’t big ’nuff ter do much ‘sides min’ de chickens, an’ sich lak. I doan ‘member so much ’bout de Yankees comin’ ‘cept sein’ dem, an’ dat dey gibe my pappy a new blue overcoat an’ dat I slep’ on it onct er twict. I knows dat de Yankees wus good ter de niggers but dey warn’t so good ter de ole Issues. Dey did ‘stroy most eber’thing do’. I can’t ‘member, but I’se hyard my mammy tell o’ dances, co’n shuckin’s, wrestlin’ matches, candy pullin’s an’ sich things dat wus had by de slaves dem days. My pappy tol’ me ’bout de cock fights in de big pits at Warrenton an’ how dat when de roosters got killed...

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Shakori Indians

Shakori Tribe: A native name but its significance unknown, though perhaps the same as Sugari, “stingy or spoiled people,” or “of the river whose-water-cannot-be drunk.” Also called: Cacores, a misprint. Shakori Connections. The Shakori belonged to the Siouan linguistic family, their closest connections being evidently with the southern division of the Siouan tribes of the East. Barnwell (1908) identified them with the Sissipahaw. Shakori Location. The Shakori moved so frequently and there is so much uncertainty regarding their early history, that this is hard to give, but, as they usually kept company with the Eno, tenancy of the courses of Shocco and Big Shocco Creeks in the present Vance, Warren, and Franklin Counties is perhaps the location most closely connected with them in historic times. (See South Carolina and Virginia.) Shakori History. It is possible that the Shakori gave their name to the province of Chicora visited by Ayllon and his companions in 1521. If so, we must suppose that they moved north later in the sixteenth century or early in the seventeenth, perhaps as a result of the Pardo expeditions. In 1650 Edward Blande and his associates found the “Nottoway and Schockoores old fields” between Meherrin and Nottoway Rivers, but the Indians were not there. In 1654 Governor Yeardley of Virginia was told by a Tuscarora Indian of an inland people called the “Cacores,” probably an attempt to...

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Harold C. Smith

1st Lt., Inf., Co. B, 1st Army, 3rd P. Inf. Born in Warren County; the son of Dr. and Mrs. H. K. Smith. Husband of Mrs. Mary Moore Smith. Entered the service Aug. 27, 1917, at Littleton, N.C. Was sent to Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga., and from there to Del Rio, Texas. Transferred to Camp Wadsworth, S. C. Sailed for France Aug. 30, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., Aug. 2,...

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Courtney K. Sadler

Wagoner, Ammunition Tr., 30th Div., 105th Regt., Co. A. Born in Warren County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Sadler. Husband of Cora Browning Sadler. Was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and from there to Camp Sevier, S. C., transferred to Camp Merritt. Sailed for France June 3, 1918. Fought at St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Woevre, Toul. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 3,...

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Morton Clifton Miles

1st Sergt., Engrs., Co. A, 534th Regt.; of Warren County; son of late George S. and Mrs. Mattie J. Miles. Entered service April 26, 1918, at Warrenton, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., April 26, 1918. Transferred to Camp Upton, N. Y. Sailed for France July, 1918. Promoted to Corpl. May 10, 1918; Sergt. June 10, 1918; Supply Sergt., 1st Sergt., September, 1918. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., July,...

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Clyde N. Johnston

Private, Med. Corps, Hdqrs. Co., 105th Sanitary Train, 30th Div. Born in Warren County, N.C., May 9, 1890; son of A. M. and Mattie Iles Johnston. Entered the service at Littleton, N.C., Sept. 19, 1917, and sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C., and then to Camp Mills, L. I. Sailed for France June 4, 1918. Fought at Ypres, Bellicourt, St. Quentin, Hindenburg Line. Citation for Honorable mention at Ypres. Mustered out of the service at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 7,...

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Garland B. Daniel

2nd Lt., Inf., Co. F, S. A. T. C., Syracuse University; of Warren County; son of S. G. and Mrs. Lizzie Bost Daniel. Entered service July 19, 1918, at Durham, N.C. Sent to Plattsburg Barracks. Transferred to Syracuse University. Promoted to rank of 2nd Lt. Sept. 11, 1918. Instructor in Military Tactics during period of service at Syracuse, N. Y. Mustered out at Syracuse University, Jan. 3,...

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Warren County, North Carolina Cemetery Transcriptions

North Carolina Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the North Carolina county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Sledge Cemetery  (hosted at Warren County, North Carolina Tombstone Transcription Project)...

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