Location: Warren County MS

Slave Narrative of James Lucas

Person Interviewed: James Lucas Location: Natchez Mississippi Place of Residence: Natchez, Adams County MS Date of Birth: October 11, 1833 James Lucas, ex-slave of Jefferson Davis, lives at Natchez, Adams County. Uncle Jim is small, wrinkled, and slightly stooped. His woolly hair is white, and his eyes very bright. He wears a small grizzled mustache. He is always clean and neatly dressed. “Miss, you can count up for yo’se’f. I was born on October 11, 1833. My young Marster give me my age when he heired de prope’ty of his uncle, Marse W.B. Withers. He was a-goin’ through de papers an’ a-burnin’ some of ’em when he foun’ de one ’bout me. Den he says, ‘Jim, dissen’s ’bout you. It gives yo’ birthday.’ “I recollec’ a heap’ bout slav’ry-times, but I’s all by myse’f now. All o’ my frien’s has lef’ me. Even Marse Fleming has passed on. He was a little boy when I was a grown man. “I was born in a cotton fiel’ in cotton pickin’ time, an’ de wimmins fixed my mammy up so she didn’ hardly lose no time at all. My mammy sho’ was healthy. Her name was Silvey an’ her mammy come over to dis country in a big ship. Somebody give her de name o’ Betty, but twant her right name. Folks couldn’ un’erstan’ a word she say. It was some...

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Slave Narrative of Isaac Stier

Interviewer: Edith Wyatt Moore Person Interviewed: Isaac Stier Location: Natchez, Mississippi Date of Birth: Jefferson County MS “Miss, my name is Isaac Stier, but folks calls me ‘Ike.’ I was named by my pappy’s young Marster an’ I aint never tol’ nobody all o’ dat name. It’s got twenty-two letters in it. It’s wrote but in de fam’ly Bible. Dat’s how I knows I’ll be one hund’ed years old if I lives ’til de turn o’ de year. I was born in Jefferson County ‘tween Hamburg an’ Union Church. De plantation joined de Whitney place an’ de Montgomery place, too. I b’longed to Marse Jeems Stowers. I don’t rightly ‘member how many acres my Marster owned, but ’twas a big plantation wid eighty or ninety head o’ grown folks workin’ it. No tellin’ how many little black folks dey was. “My mammy was Ellen Stier an’ my pappy was Jordon Stier. He was bought to dis country by a slave dealer from Nashville, Tennessee. Dey traveled all de way through de Injun Country on afoot. Dey come on dat Trace road. Twant nothin’ but a Injun Trail. “When dey got to Natchez de slaves was put in de pen ‘tached to de slave markets. It stood at de forks o’ St. Catherine Street an’ de Liberty road. Here dey was fed an’ washed an’ rubbed down lak race hosses....

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Slave Narrative of Matilda Bass

Interviewer: Mrs. Bernice Bowden Person Interviewed: Matilda Bass Location: 1100 Palm Street, Pine Bluff, Arkansas Age: 80 Occupation: Farmed “Yes ma’am, I was eight years old when the Old War ceasted. “Honey, I’ve lived here twenty years and I don’t know what this street is. “I was born in Greenville, Mississippi. They took my parents and carried ’em to Texas to keep ’em from the Yankees. I think they stayed three years ’cause I didn’t know ’em when they come back. “I ‘member the Yankees come and took us chillun and the old folks to Vicksburg. I ‘member the old man that seed after the chillun while their parents was gone, he said I was eight when freedom come. We didn’t know nothin’ ’bout our ages—didn’t have ‘nough sense. “My parents come back after surrender and stayed on my owner’s place—John Scott’s place. We had three masters—three brothers. “I been in Arkansas twenty years—right here. I bought this home. “I married my husband in Mississippi. We farmed. “The Lord uses me as a prophet and after my husband died, the Lord sent me to Arkansas to tell the people. He called me out of the church. I been out of the church now thirty-three years. Seems like all they think about in the churches now is money, so the Lord called me...

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Biography of Benjamin F. Hastings

It has been the discovery of the rich mineral deposits of the northwest that has led to the development of this section of the country, and among those who have been prominent in promoting the mining interests of Idaho is Benjamin F. Hastings, late mining inspector of the state. An excellent judge of the value of ore, and a man of unimpeachable integrity, he was well qualified for the position which he so acceptably filled, and all concerned commended him for the straightforward, prompt and reliable manner in which he discharged his duties. A native of Mississippi, Mr. Hastings was born in the city of Vicksburg, on the 31st of August 1848. His ancestors were English people who took up their abode in Pennsylvania at an early period in the history of the Keystone state. They took an active part in the affairs which shaped the destiny of the colony, and representatives of the name aided in the struggle for American independence. Benjamin Franklin Hastings, father of our subject, was born in Lan-caster County. Pennsylvania, and when a young man removed to Vicksburg, Mississippi, where he married Miss Ann Caroline Baker, a native of Somersetshire, England, and a daughter of Amos Baker, Esquire. On the discovery of gold in California, in 1849, Mr. Hastings, Sr., made a voyage around Cape Horn to the Pacific coast and became prominently engaged in...

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Biography of Walter E. Pierce

Walter E. Pierce, ex-mayor of Boise, is an energetic, enterprising young businessman who for the past nine years has been closely associated with the commercial, political and social activities of the city. He is a notable example of the self-made man who rising above the difficulties and drawbacks of early environment, makes a place for himself in the world and justly claims the respect and esteem of all. A native of Bell County, Texas, born January 9, 1860, Mr. Pierce is a descendant of an old and prominent Rhode Island family, many of whose representatives resided in Providence, where they were wealthy and influential. Lyman Pierce, an uncle of our subject, was a very active and popular Democrat, and, having been nominated on that ticket for the governorship of Rhode Island, made a very strong canvass, but was not elected. The parents of Walter E. were Charles and Elizabeth (Harding) Pierce, natives of Providence. In 1854 they removed to a sheep ranch in Texas, but in 1860 were obliged to leave that state on account of the Indians, who were very troublesome. The father did not long survive, his death taking place at Baxter Springs, Kansas, in the fall of 1860. He left a widow and six children, three of whom are deceased. The mother, now in her seventy-fourth year, is making her home with a son in Hanford,...

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