Location: Warren County MO

Biography of William Pearle

William Pearle, of Virginia, settled in Lincoln County, Kentucky, among the first settlers of that State. During a portion of the Indian troubles he took refuge with his family in the fort at Crab Orchard. His son, Henry, married Polly Owsley, sister of Governor Owsley, of Kentucky, by whom he had twelve children, seven of whom lived to be grown. The names of the latter were Samuel, William S. F., Patience, Joel, Henry, Nudigit O., and Catharine. Samuel married Sally Dugan, and settled in Warren County, Missouri, in 1830. Joel married Rebecca Wyatt, and settled in Montgomery County. Henry married his cousin, Sally A. Pearle, and settled in Montgomery County in 1833. He was a school teacher and farmer, and concluded once that he could preach as well as anybody. So he gave out an appointment at the school house, and when the time arrived, a large congregation was in attendance to hear him. . He gave out the hymn, sang, and led in prayer as well as any one, but when he arose to preach his subject flew from his brain,”as he graphically expressed it, and he could not preach at all. He apologized by saving, “We thought we could preach, but we can’t preach,” and took his seat. Another incident of an entirely different character, but equally embarrassing, happened to him soon after he came to Montgomery...

Read More

Biography of Thomas Sharp

Thomas Sharp was a native of Ireland, but emigrated to America, and settled first in Pennsylvania, from whence he removed to Washington Co., Va. He was married twice, and by his first wife he had John, Thomas, Jr., and Benjamin. By his second wife he had but one child, David, who became a Methodist minister, and lived and died in Virginia. Thomas, Jr., settled in Kentucky. Benjamin was a soldier in the revolutionary war, and was in Colonel Campbell’s command at the battle of King’s Mountain. He married Hannah Fulkerson, of Virginia, and their children were James F.. John D., Polly C., Jacob L., Catharine E., Attosa P., Hannah D., Peter L , Elvira E., Malinda M., Margaret J., and Benjamin F. In 1816 Mr. Sharp removed to Missouri with all his family except John and Malinda, and settled in (now) Warren County, three miles east of Pinckney. When Montgomery County was organized in 1818, he was appointed Clerk of the County and Circuit Courts and held the position until the State was admitted into the Union. A small log cabin was built in his yard and used as a court house, until the County seat was located at Pinckney, which was named for his daughter, Atossa Pinckney Sharp. Mr. Sharp died at the old Roinstead in 1843; his wife died two years previous. Their son James married Catharine...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Col. John Smith

Col. John Smith, of the revolutionary war, lived in Franklin County, Virginia, here he married Frances Burk by whom he had William, Stephen, John, Wyatt, Henry, Susan, Mary, and Frances William married Elizabeth Ferguson, of Virginia, by whom he had Samuel, Thomas, Stephen, William H., Mary, Frances, Susan, Martha, Elizabeth, Sarah P., and Julia. Mary married Keincol C. Gilbert, who settled in Callaway County. Frances married Colonel Peter Booth of Kentucky: Susan married Colonel F. A. Hancock, who settled in Alabama. Martha married Thomas J. Holland, who settled in Montgomery County in 1832. He represented the County in the State Legislature one term, and was Justice of the Peace in Warren County for a number of years. He died in 1862. Sarah P. Smith married her cousin, Wright Smith, who settled in Warren County in 1837. Julia married John Craighead, who settled in Callaway...

Read More

Biography of Natley Dutton

Natley Dutton and wife, of England, settled in Maryland some time after Lord Baltimore began to colonize that State. Their son, Natley, Jr., was born and raised in Maryland. He had a son, named John H., who was born in 1790. Mr. Dutton died when his son was eleven years of age, and two years afterward his mother had him bound out to learn the ship carpenter’s trade. He worked at that business fourteen years. In the meantime his mother had married a Mr. Elton, whose father was a Quaker and came to America with William Penn. They had a son named Thomas T. Elton, and in 1818, he and his half-brother, John H. Dutton, in company with Philip Glover, started to Missouri. They traveled in a wagon to Wheeling, Virginia, where they bought a flat-boat, and loading their wagon and team into it, they floated clown to Maysville, Kentucky, where they traded their flat-boat for a keel-boat, transferred their property to it, and proceeded to Louisville. There they sold their boat and came by land to Missouri. They located first in St. Charles County, where they rented land and lived two years. They then entered land on North Bear creek, in Montgomery County, and settled there. Mr. Elton married Eleanor Glover, and raised a large family of children. He subsequently removed to Grant County, Wisconsin, where he now...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Presley Anderson

Presley Anderson and his wife, Elizabeth Steele, settled in Montgomery Co., Ky., in 1779. Their children were John A. S., James, William, Presley, Jr., Lucy, and Eliza. John A. S., better known as Captain Jack, was a remarkable man in his day, and is well remembered by the old citizens of Montgomery and Callaway counties. We give his history elsewhere. Presley, Jr., married Euphemia Jones, of Tennessee, and settled first in Warren Co., Mo., in 1814, from whence he removed to Montgomery County in 1817, and settled near Brush creek. He brought his family to Missouri on pack-horses, and they occupied Robert Ramsey’s house, near Marthasville, soon after the murder of the family of the latter. The blood was still upon the-floor when they went into the house, and Mrs. Anderson scoured it up before they put their furniture in. During the Indian war Mr. Anderson served as a ranger in Capt. Hargrove’s company, in Illinois. He was a devout Methodist, and the preachers of that denomination held services in his house for many years. The names of his children were Presley, Jr., Joseph, James, William, John, Margaret, Lucy, Elizabeth, and Eliza. James Anderson married Eliza Journey, of St. Charles County, and settled on Brush creek, in Montgomery County. He afterward removed to St. Louis County, where he died. Eliza Anderson married John Dabney, who settled near Middletown in...

Read More

Biography of Hugh Logan

Hugh Logan was born in Ireland. At the age of fourteen years he had a difficulty with his father, and ran away from home and went to sea. He followed the life of a sailor for three years, and then landed at Philadelphia, and made his way from there to Kentucky, during the first settlement of that State. He married Rebecca Bryan, a sister of Jonathan, David and Henry Bryan, who had been raised by her aunt, Mrs. Daniel Boone; her mother having died while she was young. Their children were William, Alexander, Hugh, Jr., Henry (called “Boss”) and Mary A. Mr. Logan was drowned in Fleming’s creek, Ky., while attempting to swim a race horse across the stream, and his body was not found until twenty-four hours afterward. The night before his death he had a singular premonition of his approaching fate, in a dream, in which the catastrophe of the following day was clearly depicted. He related the dream to his wife, who tried to persuade him not to go near the creek that day; but he laughed at her for being scared at a dream, and met his death as above stated. William Logan, the eldest son, married Nancy H. Hobbs, daughter of Joseph Hobbs and Nancy Hughes, and came to Missouri in 1820, with his wife and, one child, on horseback. They had twelve children...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of William Bush

William Bush, of Fayette Co., Ky., had Benjamin, Ambrose, Levi, and Matilda. Benjamin married and settled in Illinois, on the bank of the Mississippi river, and was murdered under the following circumstances Parties on the opposite side of the river owed him a considerable amount of money, and he went over on the ferryboat, one day, to collect it. As he was returning that evening he was robbed while on the boat, and then thrown into the river. Levi and Matilda Bush both married and lived and died in Kentucky. Ambrose married Nancy Douglass, and settled first in Illinois, near his brother Benjamin, where he remained one year, and then in 1818, he removed to Missouri and settled at Charrette, in Warren County. In 1818 he settled on Dry Fork of Loutre, in Montgomery County. Mr. Bush was a shrewd business man, and made a fortune by trading in horses and other stock. He had a low, soft voice and gentlemanly manners, and was a general favorite with his neighbors. He died in 1873, at the advanced age of 88 years. His wife died many years previous. Their children were Greenberry, Maria, Edward D., William, and Ella. Greenbury married Sarah Cundiff, and they had-William D., Eliza A., Nancy J., Amanda G., Caroline, Mary, Clay, Edward W., Virginia, and Susan. Mr. Bush served as Sheriff and Assessor of Montgomery County...

Read More

Biography of Frederick (Friedrich) Muench

Frederick Muench, one of the early German pioneers in this State, was born in a small village in Hessen-Darmstadt, on June 25, 1799, the son of a Protestant minister. He received his early education from his father, then completed a three years course at the Gymnasium in Darmstadt in two years and entered the University of Giessen in the fall of 1816. Following in his father’s footsteps he took up the study of theology, but soon became interested in the movement which at that time was spreading throughout the German universities and which had for its object the fostering of a spirit of liberty and the revival of a love of country which had all but disappeared as a result of the Napoleonic invasion. He was an enthusiastic follower and an admirer of Charles Follen (Follenius), who was the leader of this movement at the University of Giessen, and who later came to this country and became the first head of the German Department at Harvard. He had passed the prescribed examination by the end of 1819 and before he was twenty-one years of age, was a duly ordained minister of the gospel. Although installed as his father’s successor upon the letter’s death, the life of a country vicar did not long satisfy him. His interest in the political agitation which was spreading throughout Germany and which was to...

Read More

Biography of Hugo Muench

Hugo Muench, the youngest son of Friedrich Muench, was born in Warren county, Missouri, July 14, 1851. He received his early education from his father and in Augusta, Missouri, later attended the old Elliot Academy, now Washington University, and was graduated from the St. Louis Law School with the degree of LL. B. in 1873. He entered upon the active practice of his profession in St. Louis, first with M. Dwight Collier, under the firm name of Collier & Muench. This partnership was dissolved in 1878, owing to the ill health of Mr. Collier and after practicing alone for a short time a new association was formed with Frederick A. Cline, under the firm name of Muench & Cline. About six years later, upon the retirement of Judge George W. Lubke from the Circuit bench, the firm of Lubke & Muench was organized, which continued until 1901, when Mr. Muench went to Saxony as Consul, first at Zittau and then at Plauen, Germany. Upon his return in 1905 he formed a partnership with his son, Julius T., and Mr. Lambert E. Walther, under the firm name of Muench, Walther & Muench, and in 1906 was elected judge of the Circuit Court of St. Louis, which position he held until 1913. Hugo Muench was married November 12, 1874, to Eugenie Thamer, born in St. Louis October 10, 1854, the daughter...

Read More

Biography of Emanuel F. Oehler, M. D.

Dr. Emanuel F. Oehler, whose most proficient surgical work has gained him prominence in the profession in St. Louis, was born in Yorktown, Texas, September 23, 1877, a son of the late Rev. Michael Oehler, who was an Evangelical Lutheran minister. He was born, reared and educated in Baden, Germany, and was graduated from a theological seminary there, after which he was united in marriage to Louise Mueller. They came to America following the close of the Civil war, first settling in New Orleans and later removing to Texas, where Mr. Oehler continued in the active work of the ministry to the time of his death, which occurred at Pflugerville, Texas, in 1882. His wife, who was born in Baden, Germany, died at Johannisburg, Illinois, May 30, 1917, when past the age of seventy-one years. They are survived by all of their four children, two sons and two daughters. Dr. Oehler obtained his primary education in the public schools of the Lone Star state and continued his studies in the Missouri public schools, after which he entered the Pro Seminary College at Elmhurst, Illinois, for the study of theology, it being the wish of his parents that he become a clergyman. He attended the latter school for two years and then entered Central Wesleyan College at Warrenton, Missouri, where he continued his theological studies for four years, completing his...

Read More

Biography of William A. Wyatt

WILLIAM A. WYATT. This gentleman is one of the prominent residents of Richland Township, and one whose constancy to the business in hand, and whose thrift has added so greatly to the agricultural regions of Searcy County. He is a native of Warren County, Missouri, born October 2, 1828, and is a son of Lewis L. and Caroline (Tutt) Wyatt, natives of Kentucky and Tennessee, respectively, their marriage in all probability occurring in the latter State. At a very early day they removed to Missouri and first located in Warren County, but in 1843 took up their residence in Searcy County, Arkansas, locating on the farm on which the subject of this sketch is now residing, one and one-half miles from the mouth of Richland Creek, which place was at that time but little improved. On this farm the father spent the rest of his days, dying about 1846. He was a soldier of the War of 1812, was a lifelong farmer, and was honest, industrious and well-to-do. He had one brother and one sister, John and Polly, both of whom died in Warren County, Missouri, the latter the wife of James Bland. Their father died when they were young and their mother afterward married Hedgeman Anderson, both of whom died in Warren County, Missouri, where they were early settlers. The grandfather, Richard Tutt, probably removed from Tennessee to...

Read More

Biography of Hal R. Coleman

Hal R. Coleman, attorney at law with offices in the Central National Bank building in St. Louis, was born in Warren county, Missouri, December 25, 1878, a son of the late Daniel T. Coleman, a native of Kentucky and a grandson of Jesse and Mary Ann (Trout) Coleman, who were likewise Kentuckians by birth. They came to Missouri in 1841 and here Jesse Coleman devoted his attention to farming and stock raising. He also served his country as a soldier in the Mexican war. The Coleman family comes of English and Scotch ancestry, the progenitor of the American branch being Captain Benjamin Coleman, who arrived in the new world in the seventeenth century, settling in North Carolina when that state was still numbered among the colonial possessions of Great Britain. He served as a captain in the Fifth North Carolina Continental Regiment and on the 30th of April, 1777, was taken a prisoner at Charleston. On the 12th of May, 1780, he was made brevet major of the Second Regiment. He afterward became an active member of the Society of Cincinnati and he passed away in Trimble county, Kentucky, in 1804, at the age of fifty-three years, his birth having occurred on the 23d of May, 1751. (See History of North Carolina Troops in the War of the Revolution, pp. 42 to 92.) Representatives of the family removed from...

Read More

Biography of William E. Schowengerdt, M. D.

William E. Schowengerdt, M. D. As even the layman finds wonder and interest in scanning the progress made by medical science from time to time, it is not remarkable that trained medical men should continue enthusiastic students and thereby still further deserve the faith and confidence of those who seek their healing ministrations. No men of any profession are so continuously students as are physicians, and the more competent and skillful they are the more closely do they devote attention to investigating the cause, prevention and cure of disease. They usually are real founts of wisdom; in fact, they must be. The city of Champaign has a very representative body of physicians and surgeons, and in the foremost rank stands Dr. William E. Schowengerdt, who has been identified with the professional, civil and social life of this city for two decades. William E. Schowengerdt was born in Warren County, Missouri, September’ 16, 1872. His grandparents were both natives of Germany and were early settlers in Warren County, Missouri, where Doctor Schowengerdt’s parents, Henry and Louise (Schoppenhorst) Schowengerdt, were born, the former in 1842 and the latter in 1846. The father during life was a farmer. His death occurred in Lafayette County, Missouri, January 2, 1909. The mother survives and resides at Higginsville, Missouri. They reared a family of seven children: Louis, who is engaged in farming at Higginsville, Missouri;...

Read More

Biography of William Jacobs, M. D.

William Jacobs, M. D. By the activities of a long and successful career Dr. William Jacobs is identified with the great plains period of the West before railroads were built across the continent, also with business and official affairs, and had for more than forty years been a resident of Washington County and only recently retired from an active practice as a physician and surgeon. Doctor Jacobs is still active in affairs as president of the Farmers State Bank of Washington. He was born at St. Louis, Missouri, December 19, 1844, and is now in his seventy-third year. His grand-father, Frederick Jacobs, was a native of Germany and brought his family to America in 1835, settling on a farm in Missouri. He died there in 1848. Fred Jacobs, father of Doctor Jacobs, was born in Germany in 1820 and was fifteen years of age when he came with his parents to America. They settled on the Missouri River near Washington, Missouri, where he grew up and married. He gave his active years to farming as a vocation. After his first marriage he lived in Warren County, Missouri, but in the fall of 1864 went to Nebraska as a pioneer and lived in Pawnee County, that state. On the death of his first wife in 1871 he made his home with his son Doctor William until 1876 when he married...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Joseph Gibson

Archibald Gibson, of Ireland, emigrated to America and settled in Virginia. He had a son named Joseph, who served in the war of 1812. Joseph married Susan Hudson, and settled in Lincoln County, Mo., in 1818. His children were Mary, Elizabeth, Archibald, Nancy, John, William, Patsy, Susan, Lucinda, and Malinda. Mr. Gibson was married the second time to the widow Caffer, whose maiden name was Matilda Wright: By her he had Rufus, Mary, Waller, Matilda, Martha, Richard, Emma, and Thomas J. Mr. Gibson died in Lincoln County in his 87th year. Archibald, Elizabeth, and John married and settled in Warren County. John married Sarah A. Wright. He was at a camp-meeting, once, where a woman near him took the jerks, and fell into his arms. Never having seen anything of the kind before, he was astonished and bewildered, and called out at the top of his voice, “Here, Preacher, your attention, pleases. Here’s a woman with a fit” But the “fit” soon left her, and he was relieved. Lucinda Gibson married Felix Kountz, and settled in St. Charles County. Martha married Mr. Patton, of Warren County. Malinda married Mr. Spencer, and settled in St. Charles...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest