Location: Warren County IL

1918 Warren County Farmers’ Directory – C Surnames

Abbreviations Used in this Directory a–Acres; Ch — Children; O–Owner; T–Tenant or Renter; R –Rural Route; Sec-Section; Maiden name of wife follows directory name in parentheses (); figures at end of information–year became resident of county. Star (*) indicates children not at home. Name of farm follows names of children in quotations marks. In case of a tenant, the farm owner’s name follows the figures giving size of farm. Example: ABBEY, William L. (Lena Riggs) Martha and Cora Abbey, Mother and Sister; Kirkwood R1 Tompking Sec8-5 T80a H.M. Abbey Est. (1886) Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood MEANS ABBEY, William L. – Name (Lena Riggs) – Wife’s maiden name. Martha and Cora Abbey – Mother and Sister Kirkwood R1 – Postoffice Kirkwood, R.F.D. 1. Tompking Sec8-5 – Township Tompking, Sections 8-5. T80a – Tenant on 80 acres. H.M. Abbey Est. – Owner of 80 acres. (1886) – Lived in county since 1886. Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood – Farmers’ Line Telephone Kirkwood. C Surnames CABLE BROS., Arthur L. Benn D., Monmouth R6 Floyd Sec18-30 O160a (1860) Mutual Tel. Monmouth CABLE, Charles H. (Phebe Jane Baldwin) Ch *Florence M., *Newton B.; Monmouth R6 Floyd Sec29 O60a (1860) Mutual Tel. Berwick CABLE, Frank E. (Irene Sheldon) Ch Ruth, *H Sheldon; Berwick R1 Berwick Sec8-17 O400a (1862) Private Tel. Berwick CABLE, Hiram Sheldon (Eunice Ralston)Ch Martha; Berwick R1 Berwick Sec8 T76a Mrs. Irene Cable (1893)...

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1918 Warren County Farmers’ Directory – B Surnames

Abbreviations Used in this Directory a–Acres; Ch — Children; O–Owner; T–Tenant or Renter; R –Rural Route; Sec-Section; Maiden name of wife follows directory name in parentheses (); figures at end of information–year became resident of county. Star (*) indicates children not at home. Name of farm follows names of children in quotations marks. In case of a tenant, the farm owner’s name follows the figures giving size of farm. Example: ABBEY, William L. (Lena Riggs) Martha and Cora Abbey, Mother and Sister; Kirkwood R1 Tompking Sec8-5 T80a H.M. Abbey Est. (1886) Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood MEANS ABBEY, William L. – Name (Lena Riggs) – Wife’s maiden name. Martha and Cora Abbey – Mother and Sister Kirkwood R1 – Postoffice Kirkwood, R.F.D. 1. Tompking Sec8-5 – Township Tompking, Sections 8-5. T80a – Tenant on 80 acres. H.M. Abbey Est. – Owner of 80 acres. (1886) – Lived in county since 1886. Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood – Farmers’ Line Telephone Kirkwood. B Surnames BABBITT, Albert C. (Lucile Meadows) Avon R5 Berwick Sec31 T80a Bion Lincoln (1918) Tels. Greenbush and Avon BABBIT, Edwin (Clara Johnson) Ch Livina, Dale, Albert, Florine, *Ira, *Mary, *Emery,*Homer, *Jessie, *Hobart; Avon R5 Berwick Sec27 T355a H.A. and C.E. Saunders (1901) Tels. Avon and Greenbush BACON, Charles A. (Susie Tate) Ch Ernest, Howard, Charming, Marie; Roseville R2 Pt. Pleasant Sec21 T400a B.P. Lee (1895) Tel. Farmers’ Line Swan...

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1918 Warren County Farmers’ Directory – A Surnames

Abbreviations Used in this Directory a–Acres; Ch — Children; O–Owner; T–Tenant or Renter; R –Rural Route; Sec-Section; Maiden name of wife follows directory name in parentheses (); figures at end of information–year became resident of county. Star (*) indicates children not at home. Name of farm follows names of children in quotations marks. In case of a tenant, the farm owner’s name follows the figures giving size of farm. Example: ABBEY, William L. (Lena Riggs) Martha and Cora Abbey, Mother and Sister; Kirkwood R1 Tompking Sec8-5 T80a H.M. Abbey Est. (1886) Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood MEANS ABBEY, William L....

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Biography of Thomas Buck

Thomas Buck. Among the intelligent and thrifty farmers of Champaign County one whose name belongs high on the list is Mr. Thomas Buck of section 28, Compromise Township. Mr. Buck has spent most of his active life in Champaign County, but was born in Warren County, this state, a son of Eli and Catherine (Hogan) Buck. His father was born in Vermont and his mother in Ireland. When Thomas was four months old the parents moved to Champaign County, locating south of Gifford, where the children were all educated in the public schools. Thomas Buck grew up to industrious habits and responsible manhood and at the age of twenty-seven married Sarah Graham. She was born in Logan County, Illinois, and her father, Abraham Graham, was among the early settlers of the state. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Buck started life as farmers in section 28, south of Penfield, and here their work has been tested and the best fruits of their lives realized. They have a splendid farm of 166 acres, an attractive home, and have done much to beautify the land and render it homelike as well as valuable for farming purposes. Mr. Buck’s parents in their later years moved to Penfield, and his father died there, widely recognized as one of the good citizens and kind neighbors of Champaign County. To the marriage of Mr. and...

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Biography of Eli Buck

Eli Buck. The late Eli Buck was one of the fine, substantial and prosperous citizens of Champaign County. He established his home here in early days, and before his death his name was associated with the ownership of extensive and valuable farm lands and his character and activities were such as all must respect. Mr. Buck was born in Vermont, a son of Gould and Valetta Buck. He married Miss Catherine Hogan, who still survives and makes her home in the village of Penfield. Mrs. Buck was born in Tipperary, Ireland, a daughter of Michael and Mary (Ridden) Hogan. When she was quite small her father died and her widowed mother was left with nine children. When Catherine was nine years of age her mother crossed the Atlantic and settled in Connecticut. At the age of fifteen Catherine came to Illinois, and when she was twenty years of age she met Eli Buck at Monmouth, Illinois. Their acquaintance ripened into affection and culminated in marriage. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Buck located in Monmouth, where they remained thirteen years, and then, coming to Champaign County, settled within a mile of Gifford. At that time the town of Rantoul contained only nine small houses. Mr. and Mrs. Buck went sturdily to work to build up a home, and had eighty acres well improved when, as a result of failure...

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Biography of Judge John T. Morgan

The gentleman whose name heads this review has been a conspicuous figure in the legislative and judicial history of two states. Probably the public life of no other illustrious citizen of Idaho has extended over as long a period as his, and certainly the life of none has been more varied in service, more constant in honor, more fearless in conduct and more stainless in reputation. His career has been one of activity, full of incidents and results. In every sphere of life in which he has been called upon to move he has made an indelible impression, and by his excellent public service and upright life he has honored the state, which has honored him with high official preferment. Judge Morgan was born in Hamburg, Erie County, New York. His ancestors, leaving the little rock-ribbed country of Wales, became early settlers of New England, and through many generations members of the family were residents of Connecticut and active participants in the affairs which go to form’ the colonial history of the nation. In the war of the Revolution they fought for the independence of the country, and at all times have been loyal to American interests. James Clark Morgan, the father of the Judge, was born in Connecticut in 1798, and married Penelope Green, a native of Herkimer County, New York. He was an industrious farmer and served...

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Biography of William M. Brown, M. D.

The medical fraternity is ably represented by Dr. William M. Brown, who is the leading physician of Cuprum, whither he removed in June of the present year, 1899, from Salubria, where he had continuously and successfully engaged in practice from June 1892. He was born in Preble County, Ohio, on the 18th of November, 1860. His ancestors were early settlers of South Carolina, and his grandfather, James Brown, was born in Due West, that state. James Scott Brown, the Doctor’s father, was a native of Preble County, Ohio, and having arrived at man’s estate he married Miss Julia Robertson, of Brighton, Iowa, who was born at Spring Hill, Indiana. He spent his entire life, however, near the old homestead where his birth occurred, and was an industrious, prosperous and honorable farmer. He and his wife were valued members of the United Presbyterian Church and exemplified in their daily lives their religious belief. Dr. Brown, the eldest in their family of nine children, eight of whom are yet living, was liberally educated and thus fitted for the responsible duties of life. Having attended the public schools of the Buckeye state, he further continued his studies in the university at Oxford, Ohio, and in Mommouth College, at Monmouth, Illinois. He was graduated in the Miami Medical College of Cincinnati, Ohio, in the class of 1888, having therein completed a course in...

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Biography of Francis Marion Davis

The history of Idaho would be incomplete if the biographies of two of her pioneers, Francis M. and Thomas Davis, brothers, and old residents of Boise City, were omitted. They were always believers in the great future which was in store for the state, and were influential factors in the development of its resources. When death summoned Francis M. Davis to lay aside his many enterprises, to leave to other hands his uncompleted work, the whole community mourned and, though nine years have rolled away, the memory of his goodness, his many worthy deeds and fine traits of character, is undimmed in the minds of his numerous friends. A native of Warren County, Illinois, born July 7, 1838, Francis M. Davis passed his boyhood in the Prairie state, and gained a fair education, as he made the best of his limited advantages. (For his ancestral history the reader is referred to the sketch of his brother, Thomas Davis, printed elsewhere in this work.) Having completed his education in the schools of Monmouth, Illinois, our subject determined to seek his fortune in the west, and in 1863, in company with the brother already mentioned, he crossed the plains. They settled at Boise City, and were thus among the first of the permanent citizens of this place. For many years the brother, George D. Ellis and William L. Ritchey (who now...

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Biographical Sketch of Isaac Nees

Isaac Nees, farmer, of Brown’s Creek Township, P. O. Jewell City, was born in Venango County, Pa. Removed to Warren County, Ill. Came to Jewell County, Kan., in 1871, and took a homestead twelve miles southwest of Mankato, and is now the owner of 560 acres of land; keeps eighty head of cattle and fifty head of hogs. Mr. Nees’ farm is one of the best in Jewell County, and may be called the model farm of said county. He has each forty acres fenced with hedge, and has splendid improvements. Is a member of the Odd Fellows fraternity. He was married, November 20, 1864, near Havana. Ill., to Miss Sarah A. Edkins, and is the father of ten...

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Biography of Samuel C. Varner

Samuel C. Varner, a retired banker and merchant at Moran, is a veteran of the Civil war, and was one of the earliest business men to locate in Moran. His paternal ancestors came out of Germany and were colonial settlers in Pennsylvania. Samuel C. Varner was born in Pennsylvania at Monongahcla on December 10, 1845. His grandfather, John Varner, was born in the eastern part of that state at Lancaster, was a cabinet maker by trade, was a soldier in the War of 1812, and spent most of his years at Monongahela City and at Pittsburg. He married Elizabeth McKnight, of Maysville, Kentucky. She died at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. John McKnight Varner, father of Samuel C., was born at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, March 26, 1817. He spent his early life at Pittsburg, was married at Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, and then lived for a number of years at Monongahela City. In early life he was a glass blower by trade, subsequently became a merchant, and in March, 1857, he came west and located at Canton in Fulton County, Illinois. After coming to Illinois he followed the trade of painter. In 1867 he went to Bushnell, Illinois, and that city was his home the rest of his life. However, he died while on a visit to Moran, Kansas, in October, 1895. He was laid to rest at his old home in Bushnell. Though quite...

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Biography of Benjamin C. Bond, Hon.

Hon. Benjamin C. Bond. In the public service that frequently crowns the career of men of personal high standing in a community, very often is shown a great capacity for public usefulness that the opportunity presents. In electing Benjamin C. Bond, an honored citizen of Buffalo, Kansas, cashier of the State Bank of Buffalo, to the State Legislature, the people of Wilson County gave evidence of wise discrimination and intelligent judgment. Not only is Mr. Bond an exact business man, with those habits of mind that assure investigation and accurate decision concerning the important measures brought before the legislative assembly, but he is also a man whose life had ever been marked with unselfish devotion to duty and to fearless championship of causes he had believed to be just. Benjamin C. Bond was born April 21, 1878, at Mount Sterling, in Brown County, Illinois. His parents were John A. and Parthenia (Bush) Bond. One of the very earliest settlers in Brown County, Illinois, was Rev. Granville Bond, a Methodist preacher, a faithful pioneer in the cause of religion. He was the founder of the family at Mount Sterling and was the great-grandfather of Hon. Benjamin C. Bond, of Buffalo, Kansas. His son, Benjamin Bond, was born in the circuit rider’s cabin at Mount Sterling which he built after emigrating from Kentucky, and Benjamin became a farmer and doubtless was...

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Fisher, Enos – Obituary

Pioneer Farmer Passes Away Enos Fisher Of Summerville, Laid To Rest Came To La Grande When There Were Few Signs Of Civilization – Has Made Progress The funeral of Enos Fisher, well known pioneer farmer of the Summerville district, was held this morning, interment being in the Summerville cemetery. Mr. Fisher had been bedfast about a week and death claimed him on Friday, December 10. Mr. Fisher was born in Mecer County, Illinois, February 9, 1839, and while still a small child, was taken by his parents to Warren county, and thence to Indianapolis, Indiana, and then to Jefferson County, Iowa. His education was received form the various schools in these counties, and his youth was spent on the farm. In 1862, Mr. Fisher began the tiresome and dangerous journey across the plains with ox team. His party came part of the way with a train bound for California and then the balance of the way was attended with some danger from the Indians, but they landed safely in La Grande. At that time La Grande was only a small settlement, three gardens and a few settlers being the only evidence of civilization in the valley. Supplies were brought from the Willamette valley and flour sold as high as $10 a sack in the valley. Mr. Fisher worked for 50 cents a day as his remuneration at that time....

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Biography of W. E. Taylor, M. D.

Placed at the head of a great state charitable institution, carrying the responsibility for the welfare of hundreds of unfortunates whose reason has been shattered and imbued with an earnest desire to restore his unfortunate charges to health and friends, stands Doctor W. E. Taylor, superintendent of the Illinois Western Hospital for the Insane at Watertown. He was born at Waukesha, Wisconsin, May 24, 1854, where his parents, E. T. and Esibell (Irving) Taylor resided. Here his boyhood was spent, and after thoroughly fitting him-self in preparatory schools, he entered the University of Wisconsin, and upon completing a course in that institution, took up the study of medicine at the Hahnemann Medical College at Chicago, from which he graduated. After his graduation, he began the practice of his chosen profession at Monmouth, Illinois, and remained in that city until his appointment as superintendent of the Watertown Hospital for the Insane in 1897, which position he still holds. August 5, 1879, he was married to Miss Vagima McCleary, and of this union two sons have been born, Don and Mac Taylor. Dr. Taylor is a Republican and is prominent in the councils of his party, not merely locally, but throughout the State of Illinois. During the time he resided in Monmouth, he was at the head of the health department of that city for ten years, and was mayor of...

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Biography of Samuel A. Wilson

Samuel A. Wilson, professor of Latin and Greek at Cooper College, was one of the first body of instructors in that institution when it was opened in 1887. At that time he was given the chair of languages and his influence as a teacher and Christian gentleman had entered into the lives of all the students who in the past thirty years have passed through the halls of that institution. Mr. Wilson is of Scotch-Irish stock. His great-grandfather. Archibald Wilson, was born in Ireland May 17, 1772, and learned the trade of weaver. In 1791, when nineteen years old, he came to the United States and located in South Carolina. He died July 5, 1826. He and his wife, Martha, had five sons and five daughters. Archibald Wilson, Jr., grandfather of Professor Wilson, was born in South Carolina January 5, 1808. He married in that state, but on account of his strong opposition to the institution of slavery he sought a home in the North and joined the pioneers who were reclaiming a portion of the wilderness of the State of Indiana, locating at Ellettsville, where he lived until his death March 9, 1881. He married Elizabeth C. Wier, who was born in South Carolina January 24, 1812, and died at Monmouth, Illinois, September 29, 1892. Of their children only one is now living, William B., who was born...

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