Location: Wardner Idaho

The Lead Belt Of The Coeur d’Alenes

Lead was first discovered in the Coeur d’Alene mining district, in northern Idaho, on Canyon creek in the fall of 1884, the discovery at that time being the Tiger mine, situated at the town of Burke. During same year a few other locations were made on Canyon creek, a few at Mullan, and in the fall of 1885 the Bunker Hill & Sullivan mines were discovered at Wardner. At the time these discoveries were made the country was inaccessible, with no railroads, wagon roads or trails, and the only way of getting in was by foot; ten to fifteen miles’ travel per day was about all the distance a prospector could cover, owing to the heavy underbrush and timber at that time. The prospector of that day who has not kept posted with the progress of the Coeur d’Alenes would hardly be able to recognize the country at this time. The camp at present may be divided into four districts, viz.: Canyon Creek, Wardner, Mullan and Nine Mile, and standing in the importance of output in the order named. The veins in the Canyon creek district are true fissure veins and as such are likely to go to great depth, some of them having already reached a depth of one thousand feet to one thousand two hundred feet, with no signs of any decrease in quality or quantity of...

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The Coeur d’Alene Mining District

This article, as well as that following, concerning the lead belt of the district, is contributed by F. R. Culbertson, under date of July 9. 1898: The Coeur d’Alene mineral belt of northern Idaho, in area about twenty miles square, first came into prominence as a gold-placer camp in the summer and fall of 1883. Placer gold was first discovered on Pritchard creek, near Eagle City, now a deserted camp in Shoshone County. Fabulous reports of the richness and extent of this gold soon spread and attracted the attention of the outside world. In the spring of 1884 there was quite a stampede into the Coeur d’Alene district, being somewhat similar to the present excitement over Klondike. Prospectors for the Coeur d’Alenes from the west outfitted at Spokane and proceeded thence by rail to Rathdrum, by stage to Coeur d’Alene city and from this point on by the old Mullan road (built by the government as a military road) to Evolution, about twenty miles above the Mission; and from this point on by trail to Eagle City. Prospectors from the east left the main line of the Northern Pacific at Herron and Trout Creek and continued from there by trail into the mines. The stories told by the old prospectors of the difficulties of get-ting into the country over these trails remind one of the description and accounts of...

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Labor Troubles In The Coeur d’Alene District

The following account of the recent labor troubles in the Coeur d’Alene mining district is contributed by H. H. Smith, of the Cincinnati Post, who, as a reporter of the Scripps-McRae League, was present on the scene and made careful investigation of the matter: The blowing up of the Bunker Hill and Sullivan mill at Wardner on April 29, 1899. entailing a financial loss of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars and the murder of two men was the culminating act of violence in the ten-years war between labor and capital that has waged in the Coeur d’Alenes. In...

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Ladd, John “Jack” – Obituary

John “Jack” Ladd, 80, died Dec. 23, 2004, at Mountain Valley Care and Rehab Center in Kellogg, Idaho. His funeral will be Thursday at 11 a.m. MST at St. Rita’s Catholic Church in Kellogg. Father Tom Loucks will officiate. Interment will be Friday at Pine Haven Cemetery in Halfway. Jack was born July 25, 1924, at Wardner, Idaho, to George and Ella Mae (Irwin) Ladd. He spent most of his life in Idaho, graduating from Kellogg High School. He worked for the Kellogg YMCA until it closed. Jack was a member of the Kellogg-Wardner Lions Club. He enjoyed providing service to his community, and he took part in all that he could. Jack is survived by his sister, Sister Marie Emmeline Ladd of Spokane; and by four nieces and one nephew. He was preceded in death by his parents, George and Ella; a sister, Catherine Crawford; and a brother, Jim. Contributions in Jack’s memory may be made to the charity of your choice in care of Tami’s Pine Valley Funeral Home, P.O. Box 543, Halfway, OR 97834. Used with permission from: Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, December 31, 2004 Transcribed by: Belva...

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