Location: Walla Walla Washington

Loney, Evelyn L. Paul – Obituary

Age 60 years. Home was in Greenacres. Lived there six years. Survived by two sisters, Mrs. Ida Thompson of Spokane and Mrs. Dr. Ridgeway of Olympia; two half sisters, Mr. J. A. Howard of Garfield and Mrs. Louisa Estes of Vancouver, B. C. Funeral Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. from Hazen & Jaeger’s Chapel, the Rev. Dr. S. J. Chaney officiating. The body will be sent to Walla Walla for interment. Spokane Review, February 26, 1930 Contributed by: Shelli...

Read More

Lee, Roy Thomas – Obituary

His home, S4202 Grand Blvd. Husband of Mrs. Myrtle L. Lee at the home; father of Mrs. Gladys McCarthy, Spokane; brother of Mrs. Charlotte Wilkinson, Okanogan, Wash.; Mrs. Carl Penner, Mrs. Guy Kent, Ted Lee, all of Walla Walla, Wash.; Henry Lee, Pendleton, Ore.; numerous nieces and nephews. A member of the Church of Christ Scientist; the Elks Lodge of Walla Walla, Wash., The Brotherhood of Railway Train men. A resident of Spokane 27 years. Mr. Lee will be sent by the Hazen & Jaeger Funeral Home, N1306 Monroe St. to the Groseclose Mortuary, Walla Walla, Wn., where services will be held Thurs., Oct. 5 at 2 p.m. burial services at Mountain View Cemetery, Walla Walla. Contributed by: Shelli...

Read More

Whitson, Edward N. – Obituary

Edward N. Whitson, judge of the United States Circuit Court of the Eastern District of Washington, died at his home in this city Saturday night, following an attack of paralysis last Wednesday morning. Judge Whitson was born in Salem, Ore., October 6, 1852. His education was received in the public and high schools of that day and in Oregon College. In 1879 he was admitted to the bar. September 3, 1885, he was married to Leora Nellie Bateman at Walla Walla. He lived a large part of his life in the Yakima Valley and was prominently identified with the commercial growth and political life of that section. In 1875-76 he was auditor of Yakima County and was Mayor of North Yakima from 1886 to 1888. He was a member of the territorial legislature in 1877-78. He assumed the duties of district judge March 14, 1905, at the time of the division to this state into districts. Contributed by: Shelli...

Read More

Lee, Robert E. – Obituary

Robert E. Lee, 69, range keeper for the state game department at the Kettle Falls game farm died suddenly from a heart attack while attending an auction sale in Colville Saturday [May 1, 1954]. He was born May 17, 1884 at Walla Walla and resided at Kettle Falls the past five years. Survivors include his wife Hattie at the home; one daughter Mrs. Rex Jones [Roberta] of Dayton, Wash., a son Robert Lee Jr., of Milton-Freewater, Ore.; three sisters, Mrs. Jos. Wilkenson [Charlotte] of Omak and Mrs. Carl Penner [Edith] and Mrs. Guy Kent [Margaret] of Walla Walla; three brothers, Roy T. Lee of Spokane, John H. Lee of Pendleton, Ore., and Theodore R. Lee of Walla Walla, and two grandchildren. The body was taken to Walla Walla by the Moser & Egger funeral home for final services. Interment was in the Blue Mountain Cemetery, Walla Walla. Contributed by: Shelli...

Read More

Bryson, Elmer D. – Obituary

Elmer D. Bryson, 605 Boyer, died Saturday afternoon at a local nursing home. H was 59 years old and was a resident of this region for 40 years. Bryson was a woolgrower and for 25 years, secretary of the Wenaha Wood Growers association. He graduated from the Weston normal school and the Portland Business college. He had been in the wool business 31 years and was born December 1, 1881 near Weston. Surviving him are his wife, Charlotte; a daughter and son Blanche and Howard, both of Walla Walla, and two sisters, Mrs. Daisy Scott of Enterprise, Ore. And Mrs. Bessie Davis of Redmond, Ore. Bryson was a member of the Mason, Shriners, Elks and the Odd Fellows. –Walla Walla Union-Bulletin (WA), Sunday, 8 June 1941, front...

Read More

Bryson, Howard – Obituary

Native Walla Wallan Howard Roscoe Bryson, 76, died July 18, 1989, at the Seattle Veterans Administration Medical Center. The funeral service was held today at Washington Soldiers’ Home Chapel in Orting, Wash., and the memorial service was at Sumner (Wash.) Presbyterian Church. Burial was at Veterans of all Wars Court in Mountain View Cemetery, Tacoma. Memorial contributions may be made to the Sumner Presbyterian Church through hill Funeral Home, 217 E. Pioneer Ave., Puyallup, Wash. 98372. Bryson was born July 21, 1912, in Walla Walla. He was a direct descendant of William I. Price of Orange. Bryson’s ancestors settled at New Amsterdam, N.Y. from the Netherlands and later in Iowa. Some came West in a covered wagon and settled in Cove, Ore. He attended elementary school in Walla Walla. While at Walla Walla High School, he participated in numerous activities and won a tennis championship. He graduated from high school at 15 with an IQ of 150. He earned a bachelor of arts degree in economics in 1933 from Whitman College when he was 19. While at Whitman, he was a member of Sigma Chi fraternity, French club, the sophomore play staff, was a advertising manager of The Pioneer, in pep band, manager of the operetta “Pirates of Penzance,” and a member of the Drama Club, participating in “Blue Moon.” He taught commercial and business subjects in the Clarkston...

Read More

Bryson, Blanche – Obituary

Blanche H. Bryson, 85, of 605 Boyer Ave. died Oct. 9, 1995, at the Washington Odd Fellows Home. Those who wish may meet at Mountain View Cemetery, 2120 S. Second Ave., for the 2 p.m. graveside service Thursday. The Rev. Pat Robbennolt of the First Congregational Church will officiate. Memorial contributions may be made to a charity of the donor’s choice through Herring Funeral Home, 315 W. Alder St. Miss Bryson was born March 26, 1910 in Walla Walla to Elmer D. and Charlotte Doane (sic-not her name) Bryson. She attended schools in Walla Walla and graduated from Walla Walla High School and Whitman College. A lifetime Walla Walla resident, she taught school in the Touchet-Gardenia area for a time. She was in the sheep business and worked in the family business and helped set up camp for sheepherders. She devoted her entire life to helping her parents in this venture. Miss Bryson was a member of First Congregational Church, Daughters of the Pioneers, Daughters of the Nile, Order of the Eastern Star, Rebekah Lodge Narcissa No. 2, Colonial Dames, Huguenot Society and the Whitman College Alumni Association. Surviving are a sister-in-law, Vivian Bryson of Tacoma; and two nieces, Barbara Bishop of Pullman and Katherine Holden of Woodinville, Wash. Her brother, Howard Bryson, preceded her in death. –Walla Walla Union-Bulletin (WA), Tuesday, 10 October 1995, pg....

Read More

Biography of William C. Painter

WILLIAM C. PAINTER. – William C. Painter was born in St. Genevieve county, Missouri, April 18, 1830. His parents, Philip and Jean, lived on a farm; and the early years of William’s life were passed in that home. In 1850 his father started for Oregon with his family of wife and seven children, but died of cholera on the Little blue river. Two of his sons had been buried as they camped by that stream two days before; and only the mother, with her two daughters, Margaret A. and Sara J., and three sons, William C., Joseph C. and Robert M. were left to continue their sorrowful journey to the Pacific coast. Upon the family’s arrival in the Willamette valley, they took up several Donation claims in Washington county; and the one taken by William was retained by him until his removal to Washington Territory in 1862. When the Indian war of 1855 broke out, he was one of those who enlisted for that campaign as a member of Company D, First Regiment, Oregon Mounted Volunteers, continuing to follow the fortunes of his company until it was mustered out of service late in 1856. It was the opportune arrival of this command upon the scene of action that caused the Indians at the battle of Walla Walla, in December, 1855, to give up the struggle and retreat into the...

Read More

Biography of Mrs. Hannah J. Olmstead

MRS. HANNAH J. OLMSTEAD. – Life upon the Pacific coast brings out the heroic qualities in women as well as in men. It is a social and conventional form which keeps them in the shadow of their husbands’ names. But everybody knows that the greater part of the incentive which a man has to win a position or a fortune comes from his wife. It has long been remarked that the women in the immigrant trains showed more pluck than the men; and many a dispirited husband was cheered up and almost carried through by his brave better half. Delicate women, not used to severe work, would wield the axe or the ox-whip when it fell from stronger hands, and in case of the loss of their companions could take care of their children. Mrs. Olmstead is one of these women, – a lady who can run a farm, transact her own business, and provide for and educate her children. She lives at Walla Walla, Washington, and owns her home. She is a native of South Salem, New York, was born in 1835, and is the daughter of Lewis and Eliza Keeler, well-to-do farmers, who, by the way, are still living, and are now eighty-one and seventy-six years old, respectively. In 1851 Miss Hannah was married to Daniel H. Olmstead, of Port Huron. Soon after their nuptials he was...

Read More

Biography of David Greiner

DAVID GREINER. – Although the subject of this sketch has not been a resident of this county so long as some, still he is one of the doughty and intrepid pioneers of the adjacent state, having pressed into the unbroken regions of the west in early times, and he has ever wrought for the advancement of the country where he has dwelt, manifesting true wisdom and stanch integrity and faithfulness in all of his endeavors,which have won for him esteem and respect throughout his large acquaintance. Mr. Greiner was born in Ashland county, Ohio, on May 7, 1837, to Martin and Elizabeth (Gipe) Greiner, farmers of that state. In 1849 the father departed this earthy life and in 1869 the mother was called to lay down its burdens. David remained at home during the years of his minority, receiving a good education from the public schools and learning and perfecting himself in the carpenter trade. In 1856 he followed the advice of the noted sage and went to the west, stopping in Iowa, where he wrought at his trade until 1860, then returned to the place of his birth, remaining until 1863. The following year he took up the journey across the plains, passing through the Grande Ronde valley September 12, 1864. He stopped at Walla Walla and there wrought at his trade and took up a ranch. He...

Read More

Biography of William Tillman

WILLIAM TILLMAN – We have before us in the person of the subject one of those hardy, intrepid and commendable pioneers, who wrought in this section for its development, wresting it from the grasp of the savages and fitting it for the abode of man. Especially is our subject to be mentioned in this capacity, since he came here yound and vigorous and wrought constantly here for nearly half a century, enduring all the hardships known to frontier existence, displaying an astuteness, energy, and ability, coupled with faithfulness and integrity that have commended him to the graces and hearts of all who appreciate noble and true qualities and a pioneer and self-sacrificing spirit. William Tillman was born in Newton county, Missouri, on a farm, the date being February 12, 1842. He received a common school education in his native place, securing the same during the winter months, and striving on his father’s farm to practice the art of agriculture during the summers. He continued under the parental roof until 1861, and then in company with three other families, he being nineteen years of age, he turned toward the west with his “prairie schooner” and steadily pursued his way to the setting sun, until the little train halted in the Grande Ronde valley. The accompanying travelers were George and John Howeel, Tomps Crofford and Sandford P. Robertson. They halted but...

Read More

Biography of William C. Carlton

This worthy gentleman is one of the substantial citizens of Malheur County and one of the thrifty stock men and farmers of the vicinity of Rockville, his estate of two hundred and twenty acres of good land lying seven miles west from that place. Mr. Carlton was born in Maine in 1834, being the son of Amos and Mary Carlton. He received his education from the County in the schools of his native state and there remained – until 1854 when he came via Panama to San Francisco, and thence to Indian valley in Sierra County, where he at once engaged in the fascinating labor of mining. In 186o we find him in Oregon, and then in Walla Walla, whence he returned to The Dalles and then visited his home in Maine. Returning again to California, he went to Los Angeles County, and thence to Boise, Idaho, where he engaged in wagon building until 1882, at which time he located his present home place as a homestead. Mr. Carlton has devoted his time and energies to raising stock, cattle and horses, and to general farming, from that time until the present, having achieved a good success in these endeavors. In addition to these labors, Mr. Carlton has also operated a blacksmith shop, gaining a good trade from the surrounding neighborhood. He has the prospects of a line coal mine...

Read More

Biography of Archibald W. Turner

The subject of this sketch is one of Malheur County’s heaviest property owners, having an estate of eleven hundred and sixty acres of fine soil and very valuable as a hay producer. He is one of the prominent men of the country, a man of fine capabilities, and highly respected and esteemed by all. Mr. Turner was born in Boone County, Missouri, on February 1, 1827, being the son of James and Sarah Turner. He was reared on a farm, gained his education in the primitive log school house of the time and at the native place on October 7, 1848, he was married to Miss Nancy March, a native of the same place. In the spring of 1851 he started with his wife and one child to San Francisco, going via New Orleans and Nicaragua. While on the sailing vessel from the Isthmus the little one sickened and died and was buried in the ocean. Owing to tedious delays he did not arrive at San Francisco until March, 1852, and then went direct to Yuba County, near Marysville, where he procured a farm and vent to raising the fruits of the field. He also raised stock and continued there until 1862, at which time he came to Walla Walla and then to the Salmon River mines. He returned to The Dalles to winter and in the spring of...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of William Franklin Minton

It is with pleasure that we essay the task of epitomizing the salient points in the interesting career of the estimable and enterprising gentleman whose name is at the head of this article, and it is very fitting that such be granted space in the history of Malheur County, since he has labored here for the up building of the county and has wrought with wisdom and energy for this end, while also he has spent much time on the frontier and in other places, always, however, manifesting that same energy and capability in furthering the chariot of progress and building for the generations to come. Mr. Minton was born in Cape Girardeau County, Missouri, on November25, 1856, being the son of Willis J. and Martha S. (Coker) Minton. When he was a lad of seven he was taken by his parents to Cedar County, and in 1874 went with his parents to Pueblo, Colorado, and thence he went to Florence, Colorado, and there followed farming for a time. There also he was married on August 14, 1880, Miss Minerva Jackson becoming his wife on that occasion. In 1884 he removed with his family to New Mexico, securing a farm, which he tilled until 1889. In the last year mentioned he came via the Southern Pacific to San Francisco and thence on the steamer “State of California” to Portland....

Read More

Biographical Sketch of James H. Farley

James H. Farley has led a life of activity and filled with enterprising and various labors, during which, also, he has manifested those rare qualities of integrity, up rightness, and perseverance, which together with his wise methods of procedure and Industry, have given him the competence of a prosperous business man and owner of real property. James H. was born in Dubuque, Iowa, on October 15, 1858, being the son of Patrick and Catherine Farleu, who settled at Dubuque when it was but a small hamlet, being natives of New York; state. The father served three years in the Civil war, participating in numerous battles and at the close was honorably discharged. Our subject went with his parents to Kelsey, Massachusetts, and after the war they all removed to St. Louis, where the father went to railroading on the Illinois & St. Louis Railroad where he held the position of road minister for nine years and at the time of his death, in 1892, he was general manager of the entire road. Our subject learned railroading, beginning as a Menial, then operated as engineer, and later retired from it and handled a stationary engine in Kansas City. Following that the went to work on a horse ranch near North Platte, Nebraska, remaining there until 1881, then migrated to Granger, Idaho, worked on the railroad a short time and then...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest