Location: Wagoner County OK

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Isabel Cobb

(See Grant)-Martha Blythe, born Jan. 31, 1812. Married in May 1828 Alexander Clingan, born Feb. 20, 1801 in Hawkins County, Tennessee. He died February 1, 1964 and she died August 7, 1868. They were the parents of: Evaline Clingan, born in Bradley County, Tennessee, April 13, 1835. Married December 15, 1857, Joseph Benson Cobb, born in Blount County, Tennessee, July 26, 1828. He died March 22, 1896, and she died November 17, 1918. They were the parents of Isabel, born October 25, 1858; William Cowan, born April 1, 1860 and was murdered July 27, 1880; Martha, born December 28, 1861; Joseph Benson, born February 21, 1863; Alexander Clingan, born September 15, 1864; Samuel Sylvester, born December 12, 1865, and Addie Malinda Cobb, born September 9, 1870. Isabel Cobb, graduated from Female Seminary, January 27, 1879, Glendale Female College, Glendale, Ohio, June 8, 1881 and the Womans Medical College of Pennsylvania May 5,1892. Since that date she has been a regular practitioner at Wagoner. Martha Cobb graduated from Female Seminary, June 30, 1888 and Kansas Agriculture College June 6, 1888. Married June 11, 1891, Clement George Clarke, born February graduated from Kansas Agricultural College, June 6, 1888, Yale Academy in 1895, and the Theological Course in Yale in 1900. A Congregationalist minister, he was lecturer on social hygiene with the American Army in France. They are the parents of Helen...

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Biographical Sketch of Richard M. Smith

(See Grant) Ella, daughter of Wirt and Sarah (Woodward) Fields, born April 17, 1853. Married at Fort Gibson Frank N. Smith, born in 1845. Mrs. Smith died November 6, 1891. They were the parents of Richard Martin Smith, born Jan. 28, 1881, educated in the Cherokee Public School, and Male Seminary. Married at Wagoner Aug. 10, 1903, Carrie, daughter of Columbus and Amanda Phipps, born March 4, 1887. They are the parents of Gideon, born Sept. 25, 1906 and Theron Smith, born Fe b. 3, 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are members of the Methodist Church. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and is a farmer, near Wagoner. Susannah Wolf married Henry Woodard and their son Thomas Woodard married Nannie Morning. They were the parents of Sarah Woodard who married Wirt...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. George P. Andrews

(See Grant, Foreman and Riley)-Susie Catherine, daughter of Jasper Newton and Mary Jane (Riley) Schrimsher, was born in 1878; educated at Wagoner and the Cherokee Female Seminary. She married at Wagoner in 1899, George P. Andrews. They are the parents of Howard and Hazel. Mr. and Mrs. Andrews are members of the Presbyterian Church, and he is a Mason and a prominent oil...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. James H. Thomas

(See Foreman and Riley)-Eugenia, the daughter of Eugene and Jane (Riley) Triplett, was born at Fort Gibson in 1844; was educated in the Cherokee public schools, and the Cherokee National Female Seminary. She married at Wagoner on Dee. 25, 1892; James H. Thomas, born in Oklahoma in 1874. They are the parents of George H., born April 5, 1897; Arvol V., born June 10, 1899; Theron, born July 8, 1901; Gladys M., born January 16, 1905; Helen, born January 1909; Celia and Lewis Thomas, born June 20, 1911. Mr. Thomas is a member of the Knights of Pythias; and is a prominent business in Tulsa,...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. William A. Lamon

(See Grant and Cordery)—Martha Evaline Clingan, born at Gibson Station Cherokee Nation, March 21, 1874, educated at the Female Seminary and Sedalia, Missouri, taught at Harrell Institute at Muskogee, and married at Gibson Station February 1, 1899 William Archibald, son of Robert A. and Melvina Lamon, born March 15, 1869 in Granada, Miss. They are the parents of: Mary F., born October 29, 1899; Melvina, born April 17, 1901; Catherine Wise, born October 27, 1902; Helen Martha, April 22, 1904; William Archibald, born February 4, 1910; Robert Edward, born February 4, 1912, and John Clingan Lamon, born May 3, 1913. William Archibald Lamon is engaged in the realty and cotton business and owns the Farmers and Merchants gin at Wagoner. Mrs. Lamon is a Methodist, Eastern Star and White Shriner, a member of the Twentieth Century Club and the Home Mission Society. William Davidson, son of Alexander and Martha (Blythe) Chingan was born November 25, 1833 in Bradley county Tennessee; served the Confederate army as First Lieutenant Company K, 15th Texas Cavalry. Married at Perryville, Choctaw Nation February 6, 1870 Mary Jane, daughter of Samuel and Margaret (Vickery) Bumgarner, born January 18, 1845 on the Grand River Going Snake District. William Davidson Clingan died March 31, 1912. They were the parents of Mrs. Martha Lamon. The name Baumgarner is derived from the Ger­ (I know this error is here,...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. A. J. Moore

(See Ga-sa-du-e-sge) —Bessie Shutt, born at Springfield, Missouri February 4, 1874, educated at Springfield Wagoner, December 12, 1900, A. J., son of J. W. and Elizabeth Moore. A. J. and Bessie (Shutt) Moore are the parents of: Howard W., born October 17, 1901 and Malcolm, born January 2, 1904. Mr. Moore is a pharmacist and Mrs. Moore is a member of the Christian Scientist church and is a Rebecca. Delilah Amelia, daughter of James and Elizabeth Vann was born in 1795, married David McNair, born 1774. He died August 15, 1836 and she died November 30, 1838. Their daughter Elizabeth married John Bean amid John Weir. Her children were: Amelia, David, Talbert, Augustus, William E. and Almira Neely Bean; Susan Virginia amid Clementine Weir. The latter was born May 15, 1848 and married at Springfield, Missouri, February 9, 1865 Augustus A. Shutt, a native of Virginia. He died April 8, 1875. They were the parents of Ella Virginia, John Weir amid Bessie Shutt. The latter the subject of this sketch. Benjamin Gold of Litchfield, Connecticut, the father-in-law of Elias Boudinot stopped at the home of David and Delilah Amelia McNair in October 1829 and in a letter to his brother Hezekiah wrote. “He had a beautiful white house, and about six or seven hundred acres of the best land you ever saw and Negroes enough to tend it and...

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Biographical Sketch of Phil. H. Cobb

(See Grant)-Alexander Adam Clingan, born February 20, 1801. Married in May 1828 Martha Jane Blythe, born January 31, 1812 in Tennessee. Their daughter Evaline Clingan, born April 13, 1835 married December 15, 1857, Joseph Benson Cobb, born July 26, 1828 in Blount County, Tennessee. He died March 22, 1896 and she died Nov. 17, 1918. Their son, Samuel Sylvester Cobb married Carrie Kennedy Hunter and they are the parents of Phil Hunter Cobb, born May 31, 1895. Educated in Wagoner, where he married October 1, 1918 Hazel Ruth, daughter of S. A. and Naomi Best, born June 27, 1901. They are the parents of Dorothy Louise Cobb, born Oct. 23,1920. Mr. Cobb is a farmer, near...

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Biographical Sketch of Mary Terry Parkinson

(See Grant) ——Addie Malinda Cobb, born September 9. 1870, educated in the Cherokee National schools and Female Seminary, married at Wagoner, June 4, 1891 Terry A. Parkinson, born May 12, 1866 in Coffey county, Kansas. They are the parents of Rachel May, born May 1, 1892 who married James L. Williamson, and they have three daughters. Mary June, Helen Isabel and Bettie Rhea; Ruth, born August 28, 1893, married H. Roy Cunningham; Joseph Terry, born February 9, i895, married Leotis Pelsue; Isabel Jane, born October 20, 1896, married ,James David Garrison and had one daughter, Lotta Jane, born September 5, 1916. Mrs. Garrison died December 13, 1913; Addie Florence, born January 16, 1900, married March 6, 1919 Alexander Cowan, and have one child, Alex Parkman, born February 6, 1920; Bruce Cobb, born April 30, 1901; Evie, born July 19, 1902 and James Parkinson, born July 27, 1904. Terry A. Parkinson is engaged in farming, stock raising and has extensive oil and realty holdings. Mrs. Parkinson is a home woman, a Presbyterian, Eastern Star, and President of the Arts amid Crafts Club. Mr. Parkinson is a Democrat and was elected County Clerk of Wagoner County in 1915-16, from which office he resigned in October 1917 and was elected to the lower house of time Legislature from Wagoner County in 1918. Evaline, daughter of Alexander and Martha (Blythe) Clingan, was born...

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Slave Narrative of Johnson Thompson

Person Interviewed: Johnson Thompson Place of Birth: Texas Date of Birth: December 1853 Just about two weeks before the coming of Christmas Day in 1853, I was born on a plantation somewheres eight miles east of Bellview, Rusk County, Texas. One year later my sister Phyllis was born on the same place and we been together pretty much of the time ever since, and I reckon there’s only one thing that could separate us slave born children. Mammy and pappy belong to W.P. Thompson, mixed-blood Cherokee Indian, but before that pappy had been owned by three different masters; one was the rich Joe Vann who lived down at Webber Falls and another was Chief Lowery of the Cherokees. I had a brother named Harry who belonged to the Vann family at Tahlequah. There was a sister named Patsy; she died at Wagoner, Oklahoma. My mother was born ‘way back in the hills of the old Flint District of the Cherokee Nation; just about where Scraper, Okla., is now. My parents are both dead now seems like fifty, maybe sixty year ago. Mammy died in Texas, and when we left Rusk County after the Civil War, pappy took us children to the graveyard. We patted her grave and kissed the ground,telling her good-bye. Pappy is buried in the church yard on Four Mile branch. I don’t remember much about my...

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Slave Narrative of Mary Grayson

Person Interviewed: Mary Grayson Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Age: 83 I am what we colored people call a “native.” That means that I didn’t come into the Indian country from somewhere in the Old South, after the war, like so many Negroes did, but I was born here in the old Creek Nation, and my master was a Creek Indian. That was eighty three years ago, so I am told. My mammy belonged to white people back in Alabama when she was born, down in the southern part I think, for she told me that after she was a sizeable girl her white people moved into the eastern part of Alabama where there was a lot of Creeks. Some of them Creeks was mixed up with the whites, and some of the big men in the Creeks who come to talk to her master was almost white, it looked like. “My white folks moved around a lot when I was a little girl”, she told me. When mammy was about 10 or 12 years old some of the Creeks begun to come out to the Territory in little bunches. They wasn’t the ones who was taken out here by the soldiers and contractor men, they come on ahead by themselves and most of them had plenty of money, too. A Creek come to my mammy’s master and bought her to...

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Slave Narrative of Prince Bee

Person Interviewed: Prince Bee Location: Red Bird, Oklahoma Age: 85 I don’t know how old I was when I found myself standing on the toppes part of a high stump with a lot of white folks walking around looking at the little scared boy that was me. Pretty soon the old master, (that’s my first master) Saul Sudville, he say to me that I’m now belonging to Major Bee and for me to get down off the auction block. I do that. Major Bee he comes over and right away I know I’m going to like his. Then when I get to the Major’s plantation and see his oldest daughter Mary and all her brothers and sisters, and see how kind she is to all than and to all the colored children, why, I just keeps right on liking ’em were all the time. They was about nine white children on the place and Mary had to watch out for them ’cause the mother was dead. That Mary gal seen to it that we children got the best food on the place, the fattest possum and the hottest fish. When the possum was all browned, and the sweet ‘taters swimming in the good mellow gravy, then she call us for to eat. Un-um-h! That was tasty eating! And from the garden come the vegetables like okra and corn and...

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Slave Narrative of Daniel William Lucas

Person Interviewed: Daniel William Lucas Location: Red Bird, Oklahoma Age: 94 I remember them slave days well as it was yesterday, and when I get to remembering the very first thing comes back to me is the little log cabin where at I lived when I was a slave boy back ‘fore the war. Just like yesterday I see that little old cabin standing on a bit of hill about a quarter-mile from the Master’s brick mansion, and I see into the cabin and there’s the old home-made bed with rope cords a-holding up the corn shuck bedding where on I use to sleep after putting in the day at booing cotton or following a slow time rule team down the corn rows ’till it got so dark the old overseer just naturally had to call it a day. And then I see the old baker swinging in the fireplace. That cooked up the corn pone to go with the fat side meats the Master Doctor (didn’t I tell you the Master was a doctor?) give us for the meals of the week day. But on a Sunday morning we always had flour bread, excepting after the war is over and then we is lucky do we get anything. Just like yesterday, I hear the old overseer making round of the dabins every day at four, and I means...

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Slave Narrative of Phoebe Banks

Person Interviewed: Phoebe Banks Location: Muskogee, Oklahoma Date of Birth: October 17, 1860 Age: 78 In 1860, there was a little Creek Indian town of Sodom on the north bank of the Arkansas River, in a section the Indians called Chocka Bottoms, where Hose Perryman had a big farm or ranch for a long time before the Civil War. That same year, on October 17, I was born on the Perryman place, which was northwest of where I lived now in Muskogee; only in them days Fort Gibson and Okmulgee was the biggest towns around and Muskogee hadn’t shaped up yet. My mother belonged to Mose Perryman when I was born: he was one of the best known Creeks in the whole nation, and one of his younger brothers, Legus Perryman, was made the big chief of the Creeks (1887) a long time after the slaves was freed. Mother’s name was Eldee; my father’s name was William McIntosh, because he belonged to a Creek Indian family by that name. Everybody say the McIntoshes was leaders in the Creek doings away back there in Alabama long before they come out here. With me, there was twelve children in our family; Daniel, Stroy, Scott, Segal, Neil, Joe, Phillip, Mollie, Harriett, Sally and Queenie. The Perryman slave cabins was all alike just two room log cabins, with a fireplace where mother do...

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Slave Narrative of Phyllis Petite

Person Interviewed: Phyllis Petite Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Rusk County, Texas Age: 83 I was born in Rusk County, Texas, on a plantation about eight miles east of Belleview. There wasn’t no town where I was born, but they had a church. My mammy and pappy belonged to a part Cherokee named W. P. Thompson when I was born. He had kinfolks in the Cherokee Nation, and we all moved up here to a place on Fourteen-Mile Creek close to where Hulbert now is. ‘way before I was big enough to remember anything. Then, so I been told, old master Thompson sell my pappy and mammy and one of my baby brothers and me back to one of his neighbors in Texas name of John Harnage. Mammy’s name was Letitia Thompson and pappy’s was Riley Thompson. My little brother was named Johnson Thompson, but I had another brother sold to a Vann and he always call hisself Harry Vann. His Cherokee master lived on the Arkansas river close to Webber’s Falls and I never did know him until we was both grown. My only sister was Patsy and she was borned after slavery and died at Wagoner, Oklahoma. I can just remember when Master John Harnage took us to Texas. We went in a covered wagon with oxen and camped out all along the way. Mammy...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel C. Blake

Blake, Samuel C. (See Downing, Gore)— Samuel Coke Blake, born at Cane Hill, Wash­ington, Washington Co. Ark. April 10, 1862, educated in that county. Married at Wagon­er, June 10, 1888, Georgia Anna Pharris, born Oct. 5, 1867 at Petaluma, Calif. They are the parents of: Jennie Agnes, born August 23, 1889, married Charles E. Stamps; Nita Emory, born February 11, 1892, mar­ried Charles Alonzo Spencer and has two children, Myrtle Caroline, horn February 5, 191 1 and Alonzo Blake Spencer, born March 24, 1919; John Fenlon, born September 4, 1894; Albert Watts, horn May 17, 1897; Georgia Kezzie, born April 18, 1900, mar­ried October 24, 1919, Clifford Moore and has one son, Samuel Marion Moore, born December 17, 1920; Mabel Heber, born No­vember 23, 1903; Hester Keep, born January 30, 1906 and Ruby Opal Blake, born Novem­ber 2, 1909. Samuel Blake, born January 5, 1818, in Ryde, Isle of Wright, England, and married Martha Jane Pyratt who was born in 1824. She died in 1914 and Samuel Blake died in 1878. They were the parents of Samuel Coke Blake. James and Kate (Finley) Pyratt, natives of North Carolina, settled thirteen miles west of Little Rock, Arkan­sas, in 1812, and moved to Cane Hill, Washington County, Arkansas, 1827. Since that time the Pyratt’s have been socially prominent in Arkansas. Margaret Downing, a Cherokee, married Bledsoe Gore, a white man, and...

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