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Location: Volusia County FL

Slave Narrative of “Prophet” John Henry Kemp

Interviewer: L. Rebecca Baker Person Interviewed: “Prophet” John Henry Kemp Location: Daytona Beach, Florida Age: 80 A long grey beard, a pair of piercing owl-like eyes and large bare feet, mark “Prophet” Kemp among the citizenry of Daytona Beach, Florida. The “Prophet”, christened John Henry–as nearly as he can remember–is an 80 year old ex-slave whose remininiscences of the past, delight all those who can prevail upon him to talk of his early life on the plantation of the section. “Prophet” Kemp does not talk only of the past, however, his conversation turns to the future; he believes himself to be equally competent to talk of the future, and talks more of the latter if permitted. Oketibbeha County, Mississippi was the birthplace of the “Prophet”. The first master he can remember was John Gay, owner of a plantation of some 2,700 acres and over 100 slaves and a heavy drinker. The “Prophet” calls Gay “father”, and becomes very vague when asked if this title is a blood tie or a name of which he is generally known. According to Kemp–Gay was one of the meanest plantation owners in the entire section, and frequently voiced his pride in being able to employ the cruelest overseers that could be found in all Mississippi. Among these were such men as G.T. Turner, Nels T. Thompson, Billy Hole, Andrew Winston and other men...

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Fresh Water Indians

Fresh Water Tribe (“Agna Dulce”) Indians. A name applied to the people of seven to nine neighboring towns, and for which there is no native equivalent. Fresh Water Connections. The same as Acuera (q. v.). Fresh Water Location. In the coast district of eastern Florida between St. Augustine and Cape Canaveral. Fresh Water Villages The following towns are given in this province extending from north to south, but not all of the native names have been preserved: Anacape, said to have been 20 leagues south of St. Augustine. Antonico, another possible name is Tunsa. Equale, location uncertain. Filache, location uncertain. Maiaca, a few leagues north of Cape Canaveral and on St. Johns River. Moloa, south of the mouth of St. Johns River (omitted from later lists). San Julian, location uncertain. San Sebastian, on an arm of the sea near St. Augustine, destroyed in 1600 by a flood. Tocoy, given by one writer as 5 leagues from St. Augustine; by another as 24 leagues. The names Macaya and Maycoya, which appear in the neighborhood of the last of these are probably synonyms or corruptions of Maiaca, but there seems to have been a sister town of Maiaca at an early date which Fontaneda (1854) calls Mayajuaca or Mayjuaca. In addition to the preceding, a number of town names have been preserved which perhaps belong to places in this province. Some...

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Utina Indians

Utina Indians or Timucua Indians. The first name, which probably refers to the chief and means “powerful,” is perhaps originally from uti, “earth,” while the second name, Timucua, is that from which the linguistic stock, or rather this Muskhogean subdivision of it, has received its name. Utina Connections. As given above. Utina Location. The territory of the Utina seems to have extended from the Suwannee to the St. Johns and even eastward of the latter, though some of the subdivisions given should be rated as independent tribes. (See Timucua under Georgia.) Utina Towns Laudonniere (1586) states that there were more than 40 under the Utina chief, but among them he includes “Acquera” (Acuera) and Moquoso far to the south and entirely independent, so that we are uncertain regarding the status of the others he gives, which are as follows: Cadecha, Calanay, Chilili, Eclauou, Molona. Omittaqua, and Onachaquara. As the Utina, with the possible exception of the Potano, was the leading Timucua division and gave its name to the whole, and as the particular tribe to which each town mentioned in the documents belonged cannot be given, it will be well to enter all here, although those that can be placed more accurately will be inserted in their proper places. In De Soto’s time Aguacaleyquen or Caliquen seems to have been the principal town. In the mission period we are...

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Acuera Indians

Acuera Tribe – Meaning unknown (acu signifies “and” and also “moon”). Acuera Connections. This tribe belonged to the Timucuan or Timuquanan linguistic division of the Muskhogean linguistic family. Acuera Location. Apparently about the headwaters of the Ocklawaha River. Acuera Towns. (See Utina.) Acuera History. The Acuera were first noted by De Soto in a letter written at Tampa Bay to the civil cabildo of Santiago de Cuba. According to information transmitted to him by his officer Baltazar de Gallegos, Acuera was “a large town where with much convenience we might winter,” but the Spaniards did not in fact pass through it, though, while they were at Ocale, they sent to Acuera for corn. The name appears later in Laudonniere’s narrative of the second French expedition to Florida, 1564-65 (1586), as a tribe allied with the Utina. It is noted sparingly in later Spanish documents but we learn that in 1604 there was an encounter between these Indians and Spanish troops and that there were two Acuera missions in 1655, San Luis and Santa Lucia, both of which had disappeared by 1680. The inland position of the Acuera is partly responsible for the few notices of them. The remnant was probably gathered into the “Pueblo de Timucua,” which stood near St. Augustine in 1736, and was finally removed to the Mosquito Lagoon and Halifax River in Volusia County, where Tomoka...

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Biographical Sketch of La Zell Tanney

Tanney, La Zell; attorney; born, West View, O., Oct. 8, 1862; son of LaCortes and Abbie E. Brooks Tanney; educated, Baldwin University, Berea, O., Oberlin College, Oberlin, O., graduated in law from Valparaiso, Ind.; with degree of LL. B.; married, Decatur, Ind., June 6, 1888, Cora Tricker; issue, one son, Leigh T. Tanney born Aug. 6, 1891; Cora Tricker Tanney died June 17, 1892; married, Lake Helen, Fla., May 6, 1894, Violetta Giddings; issue, one daughter, Florence M. Tanney, born Dec. 10, 1901, and died June 15, 1911; Violetta Giddings Tanney died in July, 1906; began the practice of law in Cleveland June 19, 1888, in The Wick Block; that building was torn down in 1912, so removed to The American Trust Bldg., and became associated as partner with A. W. Barber, in October, 1906; member I. 0. 0. F., K. of P. Recreation: Baseball...

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Timucua Tribe

Timucua Tribe, Timucua Indians. The principal of the Timucuan tribes of Florida. The name is written Timucua or Timuqua by the Spaniards; Thimagoa by the French; Atimaco, Tomoco, etc., by the English. They seem to be identical with the people called Nukfalalgi or Nukfila by the Creeks, described by the latter as having once occupied the upper portion of the peninsula and as having been conquered, together with the Apalachee, Yamasee, and Calusa, by the Creeks. When first known to the French and Spanish, about 1565, the Timucua occupied the territory along middle St John River and about the present St Augustine. Their chief was known to the French as Olata Ouae Utina, abbreviated to Utina or Outina, which, however, is a title rather than a personal name, data (hoiceta) signifying ‘chief,’ and utina ‘country.’ His residence town on St John River is believed to have been not far below Lake George. He ruled a number of subchiefs or towns, among which are mentioned (Laudonnière) Acuera, Anacharaqua, Cadecha, Calany, Chilili, Eclaou, Enacappe, Mocoso, and Omitiaqua. Of these Acuera is evidently the coast town south of Cape Canaveral, where the Spaniards afterward established the mission of Santa Lucia de Acuera. The names Acuera, Mocoso, and Utina(ma) are duplicated in the west part of the peninsula in the De Soto narratives. The Timucua were Christianized by Spanish Franciscans toward the close...

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History of Florida Indians

Most of the tribes considered hitherto had had very intimate relations with the Creek Confederacy, the central object of our investigation. We now come to peoples who remained for the most part distinct from the Creeks, but whose history nevertheless occupies an important place in the background of this study – first, because they were near neighbors and had dealings with them, usually of a hostile character, for a long period, and, secondly, because their country was later the home of the Seminole, an important Creek offshoot which must presently receive consideration. These were the ancient inhabitants of Florida. I have already called attention to the distinction which existed between the Timucua of northern and central Florida and the south Florida tribes below Tampa Bay and Cape Canaveral, 1See pp 27-31. and I will discuss the geographical distribution and subdivisions of each separately before proceeding to their history proper. When we first become acquainted with the Timucua Indians through the medium of French explorers we find a great number of towns combined into groups under certain powerful chiefs. It is probable that all of these groups, like the “empire” of Powhatan, were by no means permanent, yet some of the tribes remained dominant throughout Timucua history and gave their names to missionary provinces. The French speak of about five of these associations or confederacies. That of Saturiwa, or that...

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Yuchi Indians

Yuchi Tribe. Significance unknown, but perhaps, as suggested by Speck (1909), from a native word meaning “those far away,” or “at a distance,” though it is also possible that it is a variant of Ochesee or Oeese, which was applied by the Hitchiti and their allies to Indians speaking languages different from their own. Also called: Ani’-Yu’tsl, Cherokee name. Chiska, probably a Muskogee translation of the name of one of their bands. Hughchee, an early synonym. Round town people, a name given by the early English colonists. Rickohockans, signifying “cavelanders” (Hewitt, in Hodge, 1907), perhaps an early name for a part of them. Tahogalewi, abbreviated to Hogologe, name given them by the Delaware and other Algonquian people. Tamahita, so called by some Indians, perhaps some of the eastern Siouans. Tsoyaha, “People of the sun,” their own name, or at least the name of one band. Westo, perhaps a name applied to them by the Cusabo Indians of South Carolina though the identification is not beyond question. Yuchi Connections. The Yuchi constituted a linguistic stock, the Uchean, distinct from all others, though structurally their speech bears a certain resemblance to the languages of the Muskhogean and Siouan families. Yuchi Location. The earliest known location of the Yuchi was in eastern Tennessee, perhaps near Manchester, but some of them extended still farther east, while others were as far west as Muscle...

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Volusia County Florida Cemetery Records

Florida Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Florida county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Volusia County Cemetery Records Hosted at Volusia County, Florida USGenWeb Archives Clifton Cemetery Clinton Cemetery Cone Cemetery Detwiler Park Dillard Family Cemetery Dummitt Gravesite Edgewater Cemetery Edgewater Cemetery Edgewater Cemetery Enterprise Evergreen Cemetery Friendship Cemetery Garfield Settlement Cemetery Glencoe-Geiger Cemetery Greenwood Cemetery Greenwood Cemetery Groover Cemetery Hillside Cemetery Hollywood Cemetery Lake Dias Cemetery Lake Helen & Cassadaga Cemetery Mt. Olive Primitive Baptist Cemetery Mt. Zion Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery Oak Ridge Cemetery Oaklynn Cemetery Osteen Memorial Gardens Pacetti Family Cemetery Pilgrims Rest Cemetery Pinehurst Cemetery Pinewood Cemetery Ponce Inlet Grave Site Prevatt Settlement Cemetery Purdom Cemetery Roberts Cemetery Shady Rest Cemetery Spruce Creek Cemetery Woodland Cemetery Volusia County Cemetery Records Hosted at Volusia County Florida Tombstone Transcription Project Beresford Cemetery Bethel Cemetery Braddock Cemetery Causey Family Cemetery Clifton Cemetery Clinton Family Cemetery Cone Cemetery Confederate Burials Datona Memorial Park – A-D | E-M | N-Z Detwiler Cemetery Dillard Cemetery Dummitt Gravesite Ebenezer Lutheran Cemetery French Cemetery Friendship Cemetery Garfield Settlement Glencoe-Geiger Cemetery Glenwood Cemetery Glenwood Black Cemetery Greenwood Cemetery Greenwood Cemetery Groover Cemetery Harris Cemetery Hillside Cemetery Hollywood Cemetery Lake Dias Cemetery Lungren Cemetery Lake Helen/Cassadaga Cemetery Midway Methodist Church...

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