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Location: Union County NJ

Will of John Williams, – 1672

JOHN WILLIAMS, New York. Leaves to Anthony Jansen Turk, “all my tools in the house of Henry Morris in New Jersey, as also whatever I have in the house of Anthony Jansen, or elsewhere.” And all my land in New Jersey according to the records of Elizabethtown, and he is to pay to Henry Morris a debt of 40 shillings and the funeral charges. Makes Henry Morris executor. Dated October 10, 1672. Witnesses, Otto Gerritse, John Sharpe. Letters of administration granted to Anthony Jansen Turk, October 15, 1672. LIBER 1-2, page...

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Will of John Woodruff, – 1670

JOHN WOODRUFF, Southampton, L. I. Leaves to his eldest son, John Woodruff, of Elizabethtown, New Jersey, “a half Crown Piece, in full of all portions and patrimony to be expected of me.” To daughter Anne Woolley, £20. To daughter Elizabeth Dayton, £20. Leaves rest of estate to wife Ann and youngest son John Woodruff,and makes them executors. Dated May 4, 1670. Witnesses, Christopher Foster, John Laughton. Know all men by this, that the above written will ~s of my own handwriting, and I saw ye said John Woodruff sett to his marke, and take off ye seale or stamp from ye wax. As witness my hand. John Laughton. Proved at Court of Sessions at Southold, July 1, 1670. Inventory made May 24, 1670, amounts to £122 7s. 8d. “One half of ye Land and Housing and accommodations is already clearly by deed of Gift disposed to his son John, the other half we apprize at £55. John Howell, Henry Pierson, Edward Howell, John Jennings. [NOTE— John Woodruff married Anne, daughter of John Gosmer, one of the original “Undertakers” of Southampton. He adopted his oldest grandson John Woodrwff, and went to New Jersey about 1660. John Woodruff Sr., also named his youngest son John. He remained in Southampton. His homestead was purchased in 1726 by Francis Pelletrean, and was standing till recent years. It was the last house on Long...

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Biographical Sketch of Edward C. McKay

McKay, Edward C.; real estate broken; born, Cleveland, Nov. 19, 1876; son of George A. and Margaret Adam Creech McKay; educated, Grammar and Central High School; married, Plainfield, N. J., June 20, 1905, Louise Patten; two daughters, Margaret and Louise; business record, chief clerk Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, and American Trust Co.; also Pittsburg Steamship Co., and Cleveland office of Carnegie Steel Co., and United States Steel Corporation; sec’y and treas. The Ohio Rubber Co.; pres. The Bodifield Belting Co.; real estate operator; member Cleveland Gatling Gun Battery, and The Cleveland Naval Reserves; member Cleveland Real Estate Board, Loyal Legion, Chamber of Commerce, Union, Athletic, Euclid and Tippecanoe...

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Biography of P. C. Young, Hon.

Hon. P. C. Young. High on the roster of Wilson County’s distinguished citizens appears the name of Hon. P. C. Young, for years one of the most brilliant and astute attorneys practicing before the Fredonia bar, an author and poet whose talents have gained for him wide reputation, and a man who as a citizen, neighbor and friend is universally esteemed and respected. A resident of this city during the most important era of its development, his personality is indelibly imprinted upon the home of his adoption, and both as attorney and legislator he had evidenced the inheritance of many of the sturdy and courageous qualities of his German grandfather, who fought against the great Napoleon. The following sketch, including the opening and closing poems, was written by Mr. Young himself, and reviews a career that had been interesting, useful and decidedly helpful to others: “GREETINGS. Dear Friend: We dare not hope the coming year. Will every care from you withhold; Bring naught but joy and constant cheer, Turn all your ventures into gold; But rather pray for strength to meet, If needs must come, both care and strife; To rise supreme above defeat, With kindly acts adorn your life. Strength to be always just and kind, A blessing every effort make; To be of even, patient mind, Your soul to human needs awake. Despite the false asserted claims...

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Biographical Sketch of J. I. Ayer

J. I. Ayer, book and music store, Mattoon; was born in Medford, Mass., Feb. 3, 1854. In 1866, the family moved to Elizabeth, N. J.; in addition to his common-school education, he enjoyed the advantages of a boarding-school at Nazareth, Penn.; this school was of a military character, and he here pursued a course in civil engineering; at the age of 15 years he entered the firm of Roberts & Co. (dealers in books and stationery), at Elizabeth, N. J., to take charge of his father’s interest, he being a member of the firm. In the fall of 1870, he came West to Illinois, and settled in Mattoon, and engaged in engineering on the Decatur, Mattoon & Sullivan and the Grayville & Mattoon Railroads; he was thus employed about three years; in 1874, he was employed as book-keeper in the Essex House, and remained till March, 1878; in November, 1877, he purchased his present business, and since March, 1878, has given it his personal supervision. He was married in August, 1876, to Mary L. Cleveland, a native of Melrose, Mass.; has one daughter-Mary L., born Aug. 20, 1878. Mr. Ayer is a relative of the world-renowned Dr. J. C. Ayer, of Lowell,...

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Biography of Walter L. Fay

Walter L. Fay, who has been prominently identified with manufacturing interests for many years, is a son of Edmund B. Fay, who was born in Fulton, Oswego county, New York, and was finally engaged in the wholesale dry goods business in New York City. Walter L. Fay was born in Auburn, Cayuga county, New York, his mother’s home, February 5, 1859. He was educated in the Pingry School, Elizabeth, New Jersey, from which he was graduated at the age of eighteen years. He immediately entered upon his business career, working for his father for a short time, then, in 1879, entered the employ of D. M. Osborne & Company, Auburn, as an office boy, receiving a salary of fifty cents a day. He commenced at the bottom of the ladder, and by his faithful attention to the duties entrusted to him, he mounted steadily until he had attained an important position in the office. At the expiration of four years he accepted a position with A. W. Stevens & Son, the senior member of this firm being a pioneer in the field of thresher and steam engine building. After working for this firm for thirteen years, Mr. Fay started in business for himself, associating himself in a partnership with Ernest S. Bowen, the firm doing business under the name of Fay & Bowen, and manufacturing bicycle spokes and spoke...

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Biography of John Edward Stewart

The business world of New England and the manufacturing stationers’ trade suffered an irretrievable loss in the passing of one of Springfield’s most substantial citizens, John Edward Stewart, president of the printing company which bears his name, a veteran officer of the Civil War, prominent Grand Army man and highly esteemed throughout the community for his personal worth and by his business connections for his high sense of honor and unimpeachable integrity. The city of his adoption and scene of his successful labors could ill afford to part with such a forceful character, loyal friend and kindly neighbor, who was in the best sense of the term a constructive element in the body politic. Mr. Stewart was blessed with an ancient and honorable ancestry, the surname Stewart being one of the oldest and most distinguished in Scottish and English history. Its members in all generations have been among the builders of the States where they have resided, contributing in valued measure to the economic, moral, social, and political foundations of England, Scotland and the United States, to which latter country pioneering representatives of the family came at a very early date. The Stewart line is traced to the time of Cromwell, to a branch of the family as ancient as the Clan Stewart of Scottish history. At the time of the Protectorate a branch of the family in the...

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Biography of Colonel George Davenport

Colonel George Davenport was the first white man to make a permanent settlement in what is now Rock Island County, arriving here in the spring of 1816. He was a native of England, born in Lincolnshire, in 1783. At the age of seventeen he enlisted as a sailor on a merchant vessel, and for the next three years he visited France, Spain and Portugal. In the fall of 1803 his vessel sailed from Liverpool to St. Petersburg, Russia, and shortly after its arrival there an embargo was laid upon all English vessels in that port, the vessels taken possession of and their crews thrown into prison by the Russian Government. In the following spring they were released and returned home. The next voyage was to New York, in the summer of 1804, where they arrived in safety. After discharging their cargo and taking another on board for Liverpool, as the vessel was on the point of sailing, one of the sailors was knocked overboard. Mr. Davenport quickly jumped into a small boat and rescued him. In jumping into the boat he fractured his leg very badly and, there being no surgeon on board, the captain had him taken to the city and placed in a hospital, returning without him. After remaining in the hospital about two months, he was advised to go into the country to recruit his health....

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