Location: Umatilla County OR

Filer, Martha Ann Bacus – Obituary

After an illness of several months at her home near Twisp, Washington, Mrs. Martha Filer, died Thursday, August 25 [1913] age 73 years. Mrs. Filer was born January 8, 1840 in Illinois and when a girl moved with her parents to Texas, where in 1869 she was married to Jacob Filer. [Marriage date is incorrect. First child was born about 1862]. To this union twelve children were born, eight of whom are living; her daughters, Mrs. Jones of Twisp, Mrs. Tuverson of Kellogg, Idaho, Mrs. Manning of North Yakima, and Mrs. G. C. Charlton of this valley. Four sons Fred and Louis Filer of Twisp, John H. Filer of this city and Jacob Filer of Toppenish. In 1883 Jacob Filer, wife and family left Texas, headed for Washington. They got as far as Pendleton, Ore., where Mr. Filer, after some weeks took sick and died. [Jacob is buried in Ellensburg so this account seems to be in error.] After a few weeks, Mrs. Filer and her children gathered their all together and started for Kittitas valley. Once here, she bought the ranch now owned by J. H. Kresge near the Nanum Canyon and there reared her children to manhood and womanhood. In the early nineties Mrs. Filer sold her farm and with a part of her children and number of other Kittitas Valley people, moved to the Methow Valley...

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Molstrom, William – Obituary

William Molstrom, aged 50 died yesterday [February 14, 1935] after a heart attack. He is survived by his brothers, Abe Molstrom, John Molstrom, Henry Molstrom, and sisters, Marie H. Nelson, Mamie Somppi, Anna M. Littlejohn. The funeral will be at 1:30 p.m. Saturday from the Bomboy Funeral Home, with Rev. A. F. Van Slyke pastor of the Christian Church officiating. Pall bearers will be Olney Simpson, James Haring, William Embusk, James Harvey, Ed Davis, and Elmer Hendrickson. Burial will be at Olney. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Peacock, Joseph Mrs. – Obituary

Word has been received here of the death of Mrs. Charles Peacock of Pendleton. Mrs. Peacock was a sister of Mrs. Joseph Sanders, now of Scio, but formerly residents here. Mrs. Peacock has visited here many times and will be remembered by quite a number of friends. Oregon Trail Weekly North Powder News Jan 30, 1931 Transcribed by Charlotte...

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Culpus, Dick – Obituary

Hit And Run Driver Kills Umatilla Indian Dick Culpus, of Colville, Wash., an Indian, died at Pendleton Sunday from injuries received when struck by a hit and run driver on the Old Oregon Trail east of Pendleton. He was badly cut and received internal injuries. Oregon Trail Weekly North Powder News Saturday, July 28,...

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Mytinger, Vivian May – Obituary

Funeral services for Mrs. Frank (Vivian May) Mytinger, 81, who died Friday at her home near Pendleton, will be Tuesday with Folsoms’ Funeral Chapel in charge. Notice is on page 4 today. Born at Cove Sept. 16, 1884, she lived in Union County for many years, marrying in La Grande in 1903. She and her husband moved to Pendleton in 1910. He died several years ago. She had lived here the last 56 years. Survivors are three sons, Paul of Pendleton, Harry of Ogden, Utah, and Clifford of San Jose, Calif.; a daughter, Mrs. Walter P. (Florence) Hall, Pendleton; five grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Donated by Margaret...

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Belfield, Oscar – Obituary

Funeral services were held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C.M. Belfield Sunday for the late Oscar Belfield who passed this life at Pendleton on June 3. The services were conducted by Rev. Ira J. McFarland and burial was in the local cemetery. Oscar Shaw Belfield was born at Burton, Harvey county, Kansas, January 2, 1892 and died at Pendleton, Oregon, June 3, 1925, aged 33 years, four months and 11 days. He had been in ill health for several months. He leaves to mourn his loss, his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Belfield of North Powder and four sisters and three brothers. Oscar was a good boy, of a lovable disposition and was loved by all who knew him. North Powder News Saturday, June 13,...

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Knight, Martha Ellen – Obituary

Martha Ellen, wife of Robt. Knight, died at her home near Freewater, Umatilla county, Sunday evening after a lingering illness, aged 53 years, 6 months and 18 days. Deceased was a native of Missouri but came to Oregon at an early age and had made her home in this state ever since. She was a daughter of Joseph Harris, the well known pioneer resident of this city, and leaves a husband, seven sons and a daughter in addition to numerous other relatives, to mourn her loss. The body arrived from Umatilla county on Wednesday’s train and was laid to rest in the Summerville cemetery, which is the family buring ground. Elgin Recorder Friday August 14,...

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Biography of Jacob Frazier

This pioneer of the wool business in Eastern Oregon, and owner of some of the best buildings in Pendleton, is a native of the Buckeye state (1820), and while but a boy of ten went with his father to Indiana, and as a youth of sixteen to Iowa. In this state, then known locally as the Black Hawk purchase, his father died at the advanced age of eighty-three. In 1850 Mr. Frazer crossed the plains to California with horses, being one of a party of five. This company was made to pay a toll of sugar, flour, etc., by the Sioux, and near Salt Lake had eight of their eleven horses stolen. Frazer himself was sick at the time; but two of the company gave chase and recaptured the animals, arriving at Hangtown (more euphoniously Placerville), our pioneer began gold digging. One of the first men he met in the country was his brother Montgomery, who had been out a year, and who had been very successful, insomuch tat he returned East soon after and bought the farm in Iowa which Jacob had first purchased with the avails of a big job of wood-chopping that he had undertaken for the brother of Jefferson Davis. Four years of mining life proved hazardous. Indeed, the list of casualties to which Mr. Frazer was subject suggest some sort of protecting agency that...

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Biography of William Tillman

WILLIAM TILLMAN – We have before us in the person of the subject one of those hardy, intrepid and commendable pioneers, who wrought in this section for its development, wresting it from the grasp of the savages and fitting it for the abode of man. Especially is our subject to be mentioned in this capacity, since he came here yound and vigorous and wrought constantly here for nearly half a century, enduring all the hardships known to frontier existence, displaying an astuteness, energy, and ability, coupled with faithfulness and integrity that have commended him to the graces and hearts of all who appreciate noble and true qualities and a pioneer and self-sacrificing spirit. William Tillman was born in Newton county, Missouri, on a farm, the date being February 12, 1842. He received a common school education in his native place, securing the same during the winter months, and striving on his father’s farm to practice the art of agriculture during the summers. He continued under the parental roof until 1861, and then in company with three other families, he being nineteen years of age, he turned toward the west with his “prairie schooner” and steadily pursued his way to the setting sun, until the little train halted in the Grande Ronde valley. The accompanying travelers were George and John Howeel, Tomps Crofford and Sandford P. Robertson. They halted but...

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Biographical Sketch of George E. Ward

No work that purports to chronicle the careers of the leading citizens of Malheur County would be complete were there omission to mention the estimable gentleman whose name initiates this paragraph, and whose labors have been fruitful of much good to this portion of the County, as well as adjacent vicinities, having been instrumental in originating the famous Owyhee ditch and in furthering the plans for its completion, while also in general development of the country he has clone very much. George E. Ward was born in Quebec, Canada, on September 14, 1852, being the son of George P. and Elizabeth (Sherman) Ward. He was reared on a farm and in a hotel and was educated in the common schools of his native place. In 1879 he came to Silver City. Idaho and there he engaged in the sheep business, remaining in the same for five years. Then he sold out and vent to Umatilla County in this state, bought a hand of sheep and brought them to the Owyhee River and since that time he has continuously devoted his attention to the sheep business. He has a stock ranch in Grant County and one on the Owyhee River and is one of the leaders in this important line of industry, having brought to bear in its prosecution a wealth of ability, energy and wisdom that have given him...

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Biographical Sketch of James T. Davis

One of the worthy pioneers of this County, a man of ability and executive force and unswerving integrity, the subject of this sketch is now one of the leading citizens of Nyssa, and a prominent man in Malheur County. He lives one mile northwest from the town of Nyssa, having a ‘farm of one hundred and twenty acres, well improved and handled in a skillful manner, which is a good dividend producer. James T. was born in Unionville, Putnam County, Missouri, on October 25, 185o, being the son of Hamilton and Saline Davis. In 1862, the father and the oldest son came across the plains with ox teams and in 1865, our subject and his mother came the same journey with horse teams. They both made the trip without serious accident and when the mother arrived in Boise, the father was there to meet them and the reunited family made their way to the Willamette valley where they settled in Polk County. Four years later, they removed from that place to Umatilla County and in 1874, our subject went from the home in that County to Boise valley, Idaho, and later re-turned to his people, who had in the meantime migrated to Baker City. The reports which he brought from the Boise valley caused all to move there and engage in raising stock. Our subject went thence to Emmett,...

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Biography of Hon. William Rufus King

Among those granted representation in this volume, none is more worthy of notice, than the subject of this sketch. As a public spirited citizen he enjoys the confidence of the people and has become well and popularly known, not only throughout Malheur and adjoining counties, but throughout the whole state. On October 3. 1864, near Walla Walla. Washington, David R. King and Elizabeth (Estes) King, became the parents of a boy, whom they named William Rufus. His parents were pioneers of Walla Walla, Washington. Arriving from Arkansas in 1860 his father being captain of a large immigrant train, crossing what was known as “the plains”-the journey being through the dangerous Indian countries between the Mississippi and the Pacific coast. At the age of nine years he moved with his parents to Weston, Oregon, and five years later, in 1878, to Jordan Valley, in this County. After receiving his preliminary education in the common schools, he entered the Agricultural College, at Corvallis, Oregon, where he pursued his studies for three years. He re-turned again to the farm, but in 1889 left it to take up the study of law at the law school in Danville, Indiana. After graduating with high honors in 1891, he was admitted to practice by the supreme court of Indiana, and entered a law office in the city of Indianapolis. H remained there but a few...

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Biography of William Henry Canaday

It is fitting that in a work that purports to accord to the leading citizens of Harney county representation there should be special mention of the well known business man whose name heads this article and who has labored in our midst for a number of years, gaining a good success and making for himself a name and standing which are enviable. Madison Canaday was born in Hillsboro, Highland county, Ohio, on October 21, 1831, and when a boy went with his parent to Illinois and then to Iowa, whence they crossed the plains with ox teams in 1852. They settled in Douglas county, Oregon, the parents taking a donation claim. Later they removed to Yam Hill county. Miss Sarah E. Abbott was born near Springfield, Missouri, in 1842, and started across the plains with ox teams in 1852, having traveled to Texas and returned to Missouri inĀ 1844. The train was a large on and the dreaded cholera attacked them and her father was the first victim to succumb to that terrible disease, passing away on June 9. Before the journey was completed the mother died also, the date being September 30, and she sleeps near where Baker City now stands. Thus from the happy eastern home this child was left an orphan on the dreary plains. She came on to Yam Hill county, Oregon. There she met and...

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Biographical Sketch of W. D. Martin

One half mile southeast from Harney is one of the finest small grain farms in the county. It consists of eighty acres of choice land and is well under cultivation. The improvements are of a quality and kind quite fitting such an estate and its owner is the subject of this article. Mr. Martin was about the first man to try raising grain in this locality and he has made a marked success in this direction. He raised in 1901 the largest crop of any one man in Harney county and he is classed as one of the leading agriculturists of middle Oregon. W. D. Martin was born in Walla Walla county, Washington, on February 13, 1865, being the son of John and Nancy (Owens) Martin. The parents came from the state of Iowa overland with ox teams direct to Walla Walla and the father took a ranch that joined Oregon, and within one hundred yards of the state line our subject was born. Soon after that event, the family removed to the Oregon side and dwelt in Umatilla county until 1885. W. D. was educated in the common schools there and grew up on a farm, developing both his mental and physical powers in a becoming manner to a western born son. In 1885 he came to Baker county, near North Powder and on June 8, of that...

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Biographical Sketch of Wallace McClain

This well-known and representative business man and patriotic citizen of Harney county is one of the firm of McClain & Biggs, liverymen and dealers in horses and mules in Burns, where their stables are, being also owners of a fine stock ranch. Our subject was born in Scotland county, Missouri, on September 16, 1854, being the son of Martin and Sarah (Childers) McClain. The father was in the confederate army and in the battle of Pea Ridge lost his right arm. He served under Price. In 1866 the family removed to Schuyler county and our subject was educated in these two localities and he remained with his parents until 1875, when he went to Waterloo, Iowa, and took up the grocery business. In 1877 he went to Elk City, Kansas, and the next year he came to San Francisco, and thence by steamer, George M. Elder, to Portland and soon he was in Linn county. He was engaged in a flouring mill until 1881 and then came to Summerville, Union county, and freighted from Umatilla to Idaho. It was 1883 when he came to the Silvies valley, engaging with Lux & Miller, stockmen. He took a train of twenty-one cars of cattle to Chicago and another to Omaha and was foreman of the company until he met with an accident of falling under a wagon, which unfitted him for...

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