Location: Tuscola County MI

1894 Michigan State Census – Tuscola County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Akron Township – Stephen Frent, William Partlow, Elijah G. Mathews, Samuel Woodman, Joseph E. Dairy, John Smith, David Butriek, John Rothermel, Byron Adams, Daniel Vaughn, Martin Kline, Ira P. Randall, Isaac Bolster, William Jewell, Conrad Beatenhead, Uriah G. Hover, Robert Wilson, George J. Dart, John Westphal, Jacob Woodman, Cornelius Hayes, William Hess, Francis Achenbach, Eli Woodman, William Woodman. George G. Marvin, L. A. Houghteling, Lewis S. Lee, Charles R. Gotham, Henry H. Gilbert, Peter Lagrow, Isaac M. Loomis, James S. Parks, Edward A. Dickey, Albert T. Cook, Peter G. Gross, George S. Clark, Amos E. Butterfield. Jacob Eckfeldt, Peter S. Beck, Christian R. Bauer. Almer Township – Dexter M. Macomber, Charles C. Vaughn. Elias Hiveles. Benjamin Loomis. Freeman Smith, Eben Brock, John Daugherty, Charles Bills, Amandrus Hein, Nicholas Vandecar, Orville Barden, Zachariah T. Hess, Augustus Greenfield, Henry H. Bush, Elisha P. Randall, Aaron Burgess, Sanderson P. Stacy, Elias Zinn, Emanuel Hess. Edward Goyer, William Vandervoort, John Graham, Louis C. Becker, Josiah P. Hackett. Alton Knowles, George W. Leman, William E. Trader, James R. Shaver. Arbela Township – Samuel S. Bird, Mathew Tuman. J. C. Silsbee, R. H. Pierce, Jeremiah Hunter, George Klock, Ira Reed. J. B. Wood, Shelton French, James Camp. Tice Perigo, Michell Gilligan. Chauncey Wright,...

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Biography of Richard S. Rutherford

As a man among men, possessed of integrity, ability and perseverance; as a soldier, whose steady and constant service in the struggle for the punishment of treason and the wiping out of the insult to the stars and stripes was valiant and brave; as a business operator, whose wisdom and enterprise have been well manifested: the subject of this sketch stands, and it is fitting that a representation of him be granted space in this volume of Malheur’s history. Richard S. was born in Armagh county, near Bellfast, Ireland, on February 22, 1840, being the son of Thomas and Amelia (Parks) Rutherford, who emigrated to this country when this son was eighteen months old. They settled in Quebec, Canada, whence in 1848 they came to Niagara county, New York. In 1852 they removed to Tuscola county, Michigan, and few years later our subject started in life for himself, his first move was to Scott county, Missouri, where he lived until the breaking out of the Civil War. At that particular time he was in charge of a plantation. On the tenth day of August, 186l, he offered his services to fight the battles of the nation, enlisting in Company H, Eighth Missouri Volunteer Infantry, being in the Fifteenth Army Corps under General Logan and in Sherman’s Division. He went in as a private and helped with good will to...

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Budd, Thursa Gifford – Obituary

Mrs. Thomas Budd died Friday, Oct. 27, 1911 of heart trouble aggravated by a stroke of paralysis she suffered two months before. Mrs. Budd, who was Thursa E. Gifford before her marriage, was born in England, County of Devon 66 years ago, and came to America when a small child. She married Mr. Budd, October 8, 1865 in Mayfield, Ohio. They lived in Sanilac County for a number of years and came to Tuscola eleven years ago where they lived in Wells Township until last spring when they moved to Caro and bought a home where they hoped to enjoy their declining years. She became a mother of eleven children, six of whom are living; Mrs. Minnie Bailey, Baker City, Oregon; Waldo A., Ellington, Alice M. Head, Flint; Roy W., Jennings; Ethel M. Witkovsky, and Clarence A., Caro. Funeral services were held at the home on West Gamble Street Monday afternoon, conducted by Rev. S. C. Robinson and burial was in Caro Cemetery. Tuscola County Advertiser, November 3, 1911 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Budd, Thomas – Obituary

Thomas Budd, a veteran of the Civil War, died in his home on West Gambe Street, Caro, Monday, October 7, of dropsy, after almost one year of suffering. He was born in England, August 14, 1840, and was a farmer all his life coming to this county from Sanilac in 1900. He was a member of the G.A.R. and M.E. Church. His first wife was Thursa Gifford, whom he married October 8, 1865, and they raised three boys and three girls: Waldo and Clarence of this county, and Roy of Clare; Mrs. William Witkovsky, Caro; Mrs. Minnie Bailey, Oregon, and Mrs. Alice Head of Flint. Mrs. Budd died in 1911 and May 1, 1915, he married Mrs. Nancy J. Hamilton, who survives. His army life was spent as a member of the 103rd Ohio Volunteer in infantry. Rev. A. L. Dells conducted funeral services at the house, Wednesday afternoon. Tuscola County Advertiser, October 11, 1918 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Russell Todd of Lansing MI

Russell Todd7, (Chauncey6, Jonah5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1 born Jan. 5, 1830, died Feb. 25, 1907, married Sept. 10, 1875, Cora A. Brown. He was ordained to the deaconate by Bishop DeLancey in 1860 and to the priesthood the following year by the same bishop. His various charges have been: Morris (assistant) Westmoreland, Clark’s Mills, Augusta, Oriskany Falls and general missionary work in Chenango County, all in New York; Caro, Michigan; again in New York at Whitney’s Point; then in Missouri, at Lebanon and Marshfield, Cape Girarfeau and Canton. At the close of his labors at the latter place, his health had failed so much that he retired from the active ministry, returning to Lebanon to live. There he remained until 1904 when, with his family, he removed to Lansing, Michigan, where he died. Children: *1257. Agnes Goodrich, b. Dec. 19, 1876. 1258. Russell Hobart, b. Dec. 24, 1878, d. Jan. 9, 1893. *1259. Edward Robertson, b. Sept. 21, 1880. *1260. Mary Louise, b. March 31, 1884. 1261. Cora Whittingham, b. Jan. 10, 1887, m. Feb. 15, 1919, John Simeon Cleavinger. 1262. Virginia Anna McCoun, b. Feb. 10, 1892, d. July 21,...

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Biography of William H. Fife

WILLIAM H. FIFE. – This gentleman is a native of Otonabee, Petersburg county, Ontario, and is the third child of William and Mary Beckett Fife. He was born on the first of October, 1833. His father was a native of Kincardine, and came to Canada in 1820, following farming in that country. His mother was born January 20, 1811, in Ayrshire, Scotland, and came with her parents to Canada about 1820, and is still living with her youngest son on the old homestead in Petersburg county. Our subject resided on his father’s farm until he became sixteen years of age, and then went to Keen, Ontario, where he entered a general merchandise store as an apprentice, serving three years. He then clerked for John Ross & Co. in Port Hope for a year, and then entered into business for himself in Norwood, Ontario. He afterwards sold out and moved West, and, on hearing of the great gold excitement of the Caribou mines in 1862, came West to British Columbia via New York and the Isthumus of Panama. He arrived at the Caribou mines in June, 1862, and there followed mining for three years, after which he returned to Canada. After a short time he removed to Michigan, locating at the town of Vassar, where he engaged in the mercantile, hotel and lumber business for five years, after which he...

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Biography of Hon. John P. Hoyt

HON. JOHN P. HOYT. – “Every man has two educations, – one which he receives from others, and one more important, which he gives himself.” Very early in life the subject of this sketch learned this important lesson; and the fruits of its strict observance are being enjoyed by him at present. He owes his advancement to no accident of birth or fortune, but has earned success through the toilsome avenue of study and hard work. His early education was acquired at a country district school during the winter months, when the plow used on his father’s farm stood idle in the granary. By close application to his books, he became proficient enough at the age of seventeen to teach the youth of his neighborhood himself, which he did during the winter. The savings of this labor, together with the funds earned during harvest, enabled him to attend an academy located in a village not far from his rural home. He thus continued his studies until 1862 when, true to his country’s needs, he enlisted for the protection of her flag and fought nobly in her behalf until peace was restored. While in the army he determined upon the adoption of law as a profession, and applied himself to the study thereof as well as the life of a soldier would permit. After being mustered out of service, he...

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