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Location: Tulsa Oklahoma

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. James H. Thomas

(See Foreman and Riley)-Eugenia, the daughter of Eugene and Jane (Riley) Triplett, was born at Fort Gibson in 1844; was educated in the Cherokee public schools, and the Cherokee National Female Seminary. She married at Wagoner on Dee. 25, 1892; James H. Thomas, born in Oklahoma in 1874. They are the parents of George H., born April 5, 1897; Arvol V., born June 10, 1899; Theron, born July 8, 1901; Gladys M., born January 16, 1905; Helen, born January 1909; Celia and Lewis Thomas, born June 20, 1911. Mr. Thomas is a member of the Knights of Pythias; and is a prominent business in Tulsa,...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. O. O. Brannon

(See Foreman) Lucile Sarah, daughter of Owen Henry and lda Lorena (Stephens) Haworth was born at Tulsa, Monday, October 3, 1887. Educated in the Public Schools and Scarrett College. Married at Tulsa in 1906, Orval O. Brannon, born Oct. 28, 1883 in Martin County, Ind. They are the parents of Mary, born Nov. 3, 1907 and Thomas Brannon, born Jan 30, 1910. Ida Lorena, daughter of Spencer Scago and Sarah (Hicks) Stephens was born March 1865. Graduated from Northfield Academy Northfield, Connecticut in 1884. Was istructor in the first school opened in Tulsa. She married June 11, 1886 Owen Henry Haworth born April 27, 1858 in Kankakee County,...

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Biography of Mrs. Julia M. Boling

(See Grant)-Julia Matilda daughter of John and Ruth (Hall) was born Tuesday June 22, 1869 in Georgia. Married at the Martin Davis homestead on the Chickamauga battle ground, Georgia, December 3, 1891 James Madison, son of Reuben and Marguerite Boling born 31, 1856. He graduated from University of Georgia, Graduate of Missouri Medical College, Louis and University of Pennsylvania, Boling, who was a thirty second degree in died June 6, 1916. A pioneer physician and friend to the Cherokee and did much good. Reserved, talented and gracious; Mrs. Boling being possessed of ample means maintains a home in Tulsa, but spends much of her time, traveling. Joseph, son of Joseph and Susannah (Childs) Martin was born on his father’s plantation near Charlotteville, Virginia in 1740. He was elected Captain of the Trannia Militia in 1776 became Major, February 17, 1779 and Lieutenant Colonel in March 1781. His activities were directed against the Tories and their Indian Allies west of the Allegheny Mountains, they having been stirred to violence by a letter of May 9, 1776 from the British Superintendent of Southern Indian affairs, calling on them for concerted action in surprising and killing the men, women and children of the revolutionists and their sympathizers. The south had been practically subjugated by the summer of 1780 and it was only by the efforts of such a patriot as Major Joseph...

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Biography of Mrs. Bryan E. Sanders

(See Grant and Ward)-Adda LaDayle, daughter of John Lowrey and Laura Ann (Edmondson) Ward was born Wednesday August 8, 1895. Educated in the Cherokee public schools and Female Seminary. Married at Tulsa Nov, 29, 1917 Bryan Elton son of William Henry and Rose Mary Sanders, born July 25, 1895 in Benton County, Ark. They are the parents of Mariann Josephine Sanders, born July 6, 1921. Mrs. Sanders is a member of the Christian church. Mr. Sanders served six months in the World’s War as secretary to Captain Martin R. Rohn at Camp Pike. He is a member of the American Legion. John Lowrey, son of James and Louisa M. (Williams) Ward was born July 20, 1851, married January 3, 1878 Laura Ann, daughter of Augustus Van and Laura Ann (Denman) (Edmondson, born December 18, 1858 in Gordon County, Georgia. Laura Ann (Edmondson) Ward was born near Atlanta, Georgia, Dec. 18, 1858. She was the daughter of Augustus Vann Edmondson and Laura Ann Denman who belonged to two of the most prominent families in North Georgia. Her grandfather Col. Felix G. Denman was one of the wealthiest planters and slave holders prior to the Civil War. Her father Augustus Vann Edmondson came to this country from Texas in the early seventies. Locating in what is now Delaware County and was a power in the community in which he lived. On...

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Biographical Sketch of Clarke Charlesworth Lipe

(See Thornton, Oolootsa and Thompson) Clarke Charlesworth Lipe was born November 15, 1887, married at Tulsa July 19, 1914 Lucy V. daughter of John and Sarah Sellers born Nov. 22, 1888 near Stilwell, Cherokee Nation. They are the parents of Clarke Charlesworth Lipe born January 4, 1916. Mr. Lipe’s Cherokee name is, Oolasant. Mrs. Lipe is a member of the Baptist church. John Gunter married Catherine a full-blood Cherokee of the Paint Clan and they settled on the Tennessee River in north Alabama, where he made powder and operated a ferry. Their daughter Catherine married as her second husband Oliver Wack Lipe born January 20, 1814 at Fort Plains, New York. He was a merchant at Fort Gibson and the first mayor of that town. He had five children of whom Clarke Charlesworth was the youngest. One of Clark Charlesworth’s older brothers was John Gunter Lipe, born January 1, 1844. Though ordinarily happy and pleasant he wrote the following lines in the autograph album of Miss Victoria Susan Hicks on February 27, 1861: “I stand at the portal and knock, And tearfully, prayerfully wait, O! who will unfasten the lock, And open the beautiful gate? Forever and ever and ever, Must I linger and suffer alone? Are there none that are able to sever, The fetters that keep me from home? My spirit is lonely and weary, I long...

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Slave Narrative of Isaac Adams

Person Interviewed: Issac Adams Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Louisiana Age: 87 I was born in Louisiana, way before the War. I think it was about ten years before, because I can remember everything so well about the start of the War, and I believe I was about ten years old. My Mammy belonged to Mr. Sack P. Gee . I don’t know what his real given name was, but it maybe was Saxon. Anyways we all called him Master Sack. He was a kind of youngish man, and was mighty rich. I think he was born in England. Anyway his pappy was from England, and I think he went back before I was born. Master Sack had a big plantation ten miles north of Arcadia, Louisiana, and his land run ten miles along both sides. He would leave in a buggy and be gone all day and still not get all over it. There was all kinds of land on it, and he raised cane and oats and wheat and lots of corn and cotton. His cotton fields was the biggest any wheres in that part, and when chopping and picking times come he would get Negroes from other people to help out. I never was no good at picking, but I was a terror with a hoe! I was the only child my Mammy had. She...

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Slave Narrative of Mary Grayson

Person Interviewed: Mary Grayson Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Age: 83 I am what we colored people call a “native.” That means that I didn’t come into the Indian country from somewhere in the Old South, after the war, like so many Negroes did, but I was born here in the old Creek Nation, and my master was a Creek Indian. That was eighty three years ago, so I am told. My mammy belonged to white people back in Alabama when she was born, down in the southern part I think, for she told me that after she was a sizeable girl her white people moved into the eastern part of Alabama where there was a lot of Creeks. Some of them Creeks was mixed up with the whites, and some of the big men in the Creeks who come to talk to her master was almost white, it looked like. “My white folks moved around a lot when I was a little girl”, she told me. When mammy was about 10 or 12 years old some of the Creeks begun to come out to the Territory in little bunches. They wasn’t the ones who was taken out here by the soldiers and contractor men, they come on ahead by themselves and most of them had plenty of money, too. A Creek come to my mammy’s master and bought her to...

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Slave Narrative of Henry F. Pyles

Person Interviewed: Henry F. Pyles Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Date of Birth: August 15, 1856 Age: 81 That’s how the niggers say old Bab Russ used to make the hoodoo “hands” he made for the young bucks and wenches, but I don’t know. ’cause I was too trusting to look inside de one he make for me, and anyways I lose it, and it no good nohow! Old Bab Russ live about two mile from me, and I went to him one night at midnight and ask him to make me de hand. I was a young strapper about sixteen years old, and thinking about wenches pretty hard and wanting something to help me out wid the one I liked best. Old Bab Russ charge me four bits for dat hand, and I had to give four bits more for a pint of whiskey to wet it wid, and it wasn’t no good nohow! Course dat was five-six years after de war. I wasn’t yet quite eleven when de war close. Most all the niggers was farming on de shares and whole lots of them was still working for their old Master yet. Old Bab come in there from deep South Carolina two-three years befo’ and live all by hisself. De gal I was worrying about had come wid her old pappy and mammy to pick cotton on de place....

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Slave Narrative of Anthony Dawson

Person Interviewed: Anthony Dawson Location: 1008 E. Owen St., Tulsa, Oklahoma Age: 105 “Run nigger, run, De Patteroll git you! Run nigger, run, De Patteroll come! “Watch nigger, Watch- De Patteroll trick you! Watch nigger, watch, He got a big gun!” Dat one of the songs de slaves all knowed, and de children down on de “twenty acres” used to sing it when dey playing in de moonlight ’round de cabins in de quarters. Sometime I wonder iffen de white folks didn’t make dat song up so us niggers would keep in line. None of my old Master’s boys tried to git away ‘cepting two. and dey met up wid evil, both of ’em. One of dem niggers was fotching a bull-tongue from a piece of new ground way at de back of de plantation, and bringing it to my pappy to git it sharped. My pappy was de blacksmith. Dis boy got out in de big road to walk in de soft send, and long come a wagon wid a white overseer and five, six, niggers going somewhar, Dey stopped and told dat boy to git in and ride. Dat was de last anybody seem him. Dat overseer and another one was cotched after awhile, and showed up to be underground railroaders. Dey would take a bunch of niggers into town for some excuse, and on de way...

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Slave Narrative of Lucinda Davis

Person Interviewed: Davis Lucinda Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Age: 89 “What yo’ gwine do when de meat give out? “What yo’ gwine do when de meat give out? Set in de corner wid my lips pooched out! Laway! “What yo’ gwine do when de meat give out? “What yo’ gwine do when de meat give out? Set in de corner wid my lips pooched out! Laway! Dat’s about de only little nigger song I know, less’n it be de one about: “Great big nigger, laying ‘hind de log- Finger on de trigger and eye on the hawg! Click go de trigger and bang go de gun! Here come de owner and de buck nigger run!” And I think I learn both of dem long after I been grown, ’cause I belong to a full-blood Creek Indian and I didn’t know nothing but Creek talk long after de Civil War. My mistress was part white and knowed English talk, but she never did talk it because none of de people talked it. I heard it sometime, but it sound like whole lot of wild shoat in de cedar brake scared at something when I do hear it. Dat was when I was little girl in time of de war. I don’t know where I been born. Nobody never did tell me. But my mammy and pappy git me after de war...

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Slave Narrative of Katie Rowe

Person Interviewed: Katie Rowe Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Age: 88 I can set on de gallery, what de sunlight shine bright, and sew a powerful fine seam when my grandchillun wants a special purty dress for de school doings, but I ain’t worth much for nothing else I reckon. These same old eyes seen powerful lot of tribulations in my time, and when I shets ’em now I can see lots of l’ll chillun jest lak my grand-chillun, toting hoes bigger dan dey is, and dey pore little black hands and legs bleeding whar dey scratched by de brambledy weeds, and whar dey got whuppings ’cause dey didn’t git out all de work de overseer set out for ’em. I was one of dem little slave gals my own self, and I never seen nothing but work and tribulations till I was a grown up woman, jest about. De niggers had hard traveling on de plantation whar I was born and raised, ’cause old Master live in town and jest had de overseer on de place, but iffen he had lived out dar hisself I speck it been as bad, ’cause he was a hard driver his own self. He git biling mad when de Yankees have dat big battle at Pea Ridge and scatter de ‘Federates all down through our country all bleeding and tied up and hungry, and...

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Slave Narrative of Mary Lindsay

Person Interviewed: Mary Lindsay Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Date of Birth: September 20, 1845 Age: 91 My slavery, days wasn’t like most people tell you about. ’cause I was two to my young Mistress and cont away to have when I was jest a little girl. and I didn’t live on a big plantation a very long time. I got an old family Bible what ray I war born on September 20, in 1845 but I don’t know who yut he writing in it unclear it was my mammy’s witness. My mammy had de book when she die. My mammy come out to the Indian country from Eiariy two years before I was born. She was try slave of a Chicasaw part-breed name Sobe Love. He was the kinsfolks of Mr. Eenjamin Love, and Mr. Henry Love what bring the big bunches of the Chickasaws out from Mississipi to the Choctaw country when the Chickasaws sign my do trouty to leave Mississippi, and the whole Love family settle ’round on the Red River below Fort Washita. There that I was born. My mammy any dey have a terrible have time again the sickness when they first come out into that country, because it was low and swampy and all full of came brakes, and everybody have the smallpox and the malaria and fever all the time Lots of the Chickness...

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Slave Narrative of Joanna Draper

Person Interviewed: Joanna Draper Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Hazelhurst Mississippi Age: 83 Most folks can’t remember many things happened to ’em when they only eight years old, but one of my biggest tribulations come about dat time and I never will forget it! That was when I was took away from my own mammy and pappy and sent off and bound out to another man, way off two-three hundred miles away from whar I live. And dat’s the last time I ever see either one of them, or any my own kinfolks! Whar I was born was at Hazelhurst. Mississippi. Jest a little piece east of Hazelhurst, close to the Pearl River, and that place was a kind of new plantation what my Master, Dr. Alexander, bought when he moved into Mississippi from up in Virginia awhile before the war. They said my mammy brings me down to Mississippi, and I was born jest right after she got there. My mammy’s name was Margaret, and she was born under the Ramson’s, back in Tennessee. She belonged to Dave Ramson, and his pappy had come to Tennessee to settle on war land, and he had knowed Dr. Alexander’s people back in Virginia too. My pappy’s name was Addison. end he always belonged to Dr. Alexander. Old doctor bought my mammy ’cause my pappy liked her. Old doctor live...

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Slave Narrative of William Hutson

Person Interviewed: William Hutson Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Age: 98 When a feller gets as old as me it’s a keep easier to forget things than it is to remember, but I ain’t never forget that old plantation where good old Doctor Allison lived back there in Georgia long before the war that brought us slaves the freedom. I hear the slaves talking about noon maters when I was a boy. They wasn’t talking about Master Allison though, ’cause he was a good man and took part for the slaves when any trouble come up with the overseer. The Mistress’ name was Louisa (the same name as the gal I was married to later after the war), and she was just about as mean as was the old Master good. I was the house boy when I gets old enough to understand what the Master wants done and I does it just like he says, as I reckon that’s why we always get along together. The Master helped to raise my money. When I was born he says to her (my Mammy tells me when I gets older): “Cheney”, the old Master say, “that boy is going be different from these other children. I aims to are that he is. He’s going be in the house all the time, he ain’t going work in the fields; he’s going to stay...

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Slave Narrative of Allen V. Manning

Person Interviewed: Allen V. Manning Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Clarke County Mississippi Date of Birth: 1850 Age: 87 Occupation: Sells Milk I always been somewhar in the South, mostly in Texas when I was a young man, and of course us Negroes never got much of a show in court matters, but I reckon if I had of had the chance to set on a jury I would of made a mighty poor out at it. No sir. I jest can’t set in judgement on nobody, ’cause I learned when I was jest a little boy that good people and bad people, makes no difference which, jest keep on living and doing like they been taught, and I jest can’t seen to blame them none for what they do iffen they been taught that way. I was born in slavery, and I belonged to a Baptist preacher. Until I was fifteen years old I was taught that I was his own chattel-property, and he could do with me like he wanted to, but he had been taught that way too, and we both believed it. I never did hold nothing against him for being hard on Negroes sometimes, and I don’t think I ever would of had any trouble even if I had of growed up and died in slavery. The young Negroes don’t know nothing ’bout...

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