Location: Tucson Arizona

Biography of George W. Deitzler, Gen.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Gen. George W. Deitzler, one of the famous “treason prisoners” to be taken from Lawrence to Lecompton, afterward prominent in the public affairs of the Territory and State of Kansas and prominent in the Civil war, was born at Pine Grove, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, November 30, 1826. He received a common school edncation and removed to Kansas, where he became one of the prominent figures of the free-state party. He was a delegate to the Topeka convention, and in May, 1856, was one of the seven men who were arrested at Lawrence and taken to Lecompton under guard of Federal troops. They were known as the “treason prisoners” and were kept in a prison camp for several months. During the winter of 1857-58 he was a member and speaker of the Kansas House of Representatives and was re-elected. Subsequently he was elected mayor of Lawrence, and also served as treasurer of the State University. At the outbreak of the Civil war he was made colonel of the First Kansas; was seriously wounded at the battle of Wilson’s Creek, in August, 1861, and never entirely recovered. He remained in the service, however, was promoted to brigadier general, but resigned in 1863. During Price’s raid he rendered great service in protecting the border. In 1864 he was commissioned...

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Biography of Norman M. Ruick

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now This distinguished practitioner at the bar of Idaho has been connected with the leading interests of the state for some years, and in all the relations of life he has commanded the respect and confidence of his fellow men by his fidelity to duty and his devotion to the interests entrusted to his care. He comes from the far east, being a native of Connecticut. His birth occurred in Granby, that state, on the 4th of October, 1854, and his ancestry includes both Irish and Puritan stock. His paternal great-grandfather, a native of the Emerald Isle, emigrated to the New World and took up his residence in Hartford County, Connecticut, where he resided for many years. When the colonies attempted to throw off the yoke of British tyranny, he joined the army and valiantly fought in the war which gave to the nation her independence. The grandfather of our subject, William Ruick, Sr., and the father, who also bore the name of William, were both born in Granby, Connecticut, the latter on the l0th of July, 1822. He was a carriage-maker by trade and followed that pursuit in order to gain a livelihood for his family. He married Miss Temperance C. Hutchinson, a native of Mansfield, Connecticut, and a representative of one of the old Puritan...

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Biography of James Cyrus Preston, M. D.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now James Cyrus Preston, M. D. One of the foremost men of Buffalo, Kansas, is Dr. James Cyrus Preston, the pioneer physician, and for many years the leader in medical thought in Wilson County, and the wise adviser and stable supporter of public enterprises which have assisted greatly in the town’s development. Doctor Preston came first to Buffalo after some years of medical experience in Arizona, and thus was well prepared for the hardships and handicaps that attended his early days here, in 1889, and with the exception of an interim of five years, had been a continuous resident and a busy physician and surgeon. He was born in Fulton County, Illinois, March 13, 1863. His parents were William H. and Adaline (Thomas) Preston. The early Prestons were of English birth and descent and were Colonial settlers in New England. The grandfather of Doctor Preston was Richard Preston, who was born in Vermont, in 1805, and died in Howard County, Iowa, in 1882. In 1845 he removed with his family to Winnebago County, Illinois, seeking work as a carpenter and cabinetmaker, in which he was skilled. It is said of him that he had great facility with the drum and his services were often in demand when militia was under training. His wife, Hannah Gilmore, was born...

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Brooks, Leonard H. – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Enterprise, Oregon Leonard H. Brooks, 86, died April 6, 2005, in Surprise, Ariz. He was born September 26, 1918, in Tucson, Ariz., to Leonard and Elisabeth (Adams) Brooks Sr. As a child, he spent two years living in Mexico and learned to speak Spanish. As a young teenager, he spent a summer living with the Apache Indians and learned the art of bow and arrow making and shooting. After graduating from high school he worked as a cowboy and as a powder man in the mines. During World War II, he was a bomber pilot flying B-25s over Italy. While serving in the Army, he married Dorothy Custis and they had two children, Bamey and Penny. He loved to racehorses, so on his way home from the war he bought his first quarter horse and moved his family to Yoncalla, where he, his father and brother owned a ranch and a small sawmill operation. In 1955 he moved his family to Enterprise. In the late sixties, he divorced and then moved to Alaska in the early seventies. In Alaska, he hunted big game with both rifle and bow and arrow. He loved camping, photography, flying and meeting the many challenges of the Alaskan wilderness. He owned several bush planes while in Alaska. He also enjoyed writing...

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Biographical Sketch of William Toby Noyes

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now William Toby Noyes was born August 22, 1836, in Durham, Cumberland County, Maine. His parents, John Henry and Sarah Webb (Toby) Noyes, were natives respectively of England and Wales. His father was a politician, and was elected as the first clerk of Pawnel, and was a profound student and a strong advocate of the temperance cause. He died at the residence of his son William, in California, in 1880, at the age of seventy-six. Mr. Noyes came to California by water in 1863, and landed in San Francisco in May of that year. He had previously (in 1861) made a trip to Cuba, where be worked at the carpenter’s trade for one year. He also spent some time building, etc., in Virginia City, and in 1865 went back to San Francisco and worked for the Government for one year. Then he went to East Oakland, where he engaged in building and contracting for fourteen years. From there he went to Tucson, Arizona, and contracted for about one year. From the latter place he moved to San Bernardino County, and bought 120 acres of land in Highlands, in partnership with William H. Randall, and has given his attention to fruit and vine culture ever since. He was married in March 1861, to Miss Harriet Randall, of Pawnel,...

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Biographical Sketch of Hon. Frederic W. Gregg

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Hon. Frederic W. Gregg, of the law firm of Harris & Gregg, is a Green Mountain boy, born in Vermont, thirty-two years ago; was educated in Dartmouth College, celebrated as the alma mater of eminent men of action, men who have led in the fields of law and politics and commerce, where a combination of mental and physical vigor are the motive power of success. Graduating from Dartmouth in the class of 1878, Mr. Gregg studied law in the office of Hon. Frank Plumley, United States District Attorney for Vermont, and at the Columbia Law School. In June 1881, he came west and opened a law office in Tucson, Arizona. In March 1882, he was appointed United States Commissioner for the First Judicial District of Arizona, which office he filled for three years. In November 1882, he was elected a member of the Board of School Trustees of Tucson. He ran for district attorney of that county in 1884 on the Republican ticket and was defeated by a few votes. In March 1885, upon the petition of the bar of the county, Mr. Gregg was appointed County Judge of Pima County, and at the expiration of the term of two years was elected to the office as his own successor, receiving a larger vote than any...

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Christensen, Joyce Mary “Joy” Mrs. – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Baker City, Baker County, Oregon Joyce “Joy” Mary Christensen, 62, of Baker City, died June 3, 2003. In lieu of a memorial service, a picnic will be held in her memory for friends and family sometime in July. For more information, please call Dan Christensen at 425/880-4949 or Wes Christensen at 523-5561. Joy was born on Oct. 24, 1941, in Butte, Mont. She spent her childhood moving around with her parents, working ranches all over the western United States and Canada, where she acquired her love of horses. She later married and settled in the Baker area where she raised a family. She spent that time training and raising horses and spent many years involved in the 4-H horse program, in addition to maintaining the family business. Joy also attended many riding schools, including the renowned Fulmer Riding Academy in Aiken, S.C. In 1980, she relocated to western Washington where she worked as head trainer and riding instructor at Barnaby Stables on Bainbridge Island. She later moved to Tucson, Ariz., where she worked as a ranch hand at a guest ranch outside of Tucson. Later her travels took her to western Kansas where she worked and managed a cattle ranch. Joy later returned to the Baker area, where she spent her last years as a musician,...

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Biography of Hon. Theodore L. Stiles

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now HON. THEODORE L. STILES. – Honorable Theodore L. Stiles was born at Medway, Clarke county, Ohio, July 12, 1848, and was the only child of Daniel J. and Marie S. Stiles. His mother’s maiden name was Lamme; and she, too, was a native of the same county as her son. Mr. Stiles’ father was born of German and English parents, in Danplin county, Pennsylvania. His mother’s family were emigrants from Virginia in 1809. Until the age of sixteen, he remained at his birthplace, which was a small interior farming village. But, his mother having died in 1863, his father removed in 1865 to Indianapolis, Indiana, where he entered into mercantile business; and the young man was for a few months an assistant of his father’s firm. But although his father had not had the advantages of education, he was one of those who to the keenest degree realized its future importance to the young; and he, therefore, at great sacrifice to himself, opened to his son the use of his lifetime earnings. The young man was fairly prepared for study, and chose at first to enter the Ohio University at Athens. There he spent two years, laying the foundation for admission to Amherst College, at Amherst, Massachusetts, where he entered as freshman September 10, 1867. After...

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Cashmere, Donald Ray – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Baker City, Baker County, Oregon Donald Ray Cashmere, 40, died April 9, 2006, at his home in Baker City. His memorial service will be at 2 p.m. Thursday at the McEwen Bible Fellowship in Sumpter. Pastor Mark Norenberg of Granite will officiate. Friends are invited to attend a benefit buffet-style lunch at the Sumpter Nugget Restaurant after the service. Don was born on Aug. 11, 1965, at Tucson, Ariz., where he lived until moving to Portland in 1969. In 2002, he moved to Baker City to be closer to Mommy. Finally settling down, Don made a commitment to a “speed bump,” Tene. The couple had been together 14 years and were married for nine years. Don loved to work with wood and was always making special things for his family and friends. He learned his carpentry trade in the Job Corps and was working with Mark Norenberg building log cabins at the time of his death. He enjoyed fishing, snowmobiling and riding his three-wheeler. Don also loved to go out and pick mushrooms (a hobby that started with his baby sister, Marge). Don’s favorite gathering to entertain his friends and family was building a bonfire. Don was always willing to help any two-legged or four-legged strays. Don and Tene’s door was always open. He was preceded...

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Berry, Steven D. – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Steven D. Berry, 30, of Tucson, Ariz., a former Baker City resident, died of heart failure on Oct. 22, 2006, at Tucson. A private service will be scheduled later. Steven was born on July 16, 1976, at Fort Carson, Colo., to Daniel and Sherry Brown Martin. He moved to Springfield at a young age and then to Yamhill where he attended Yamhill Carlton High School. He moved to Baker City in 1991. While in Baker City, he worked for Pizza Hut. In 2005, he moved to Tucson, Ariz. He loved music, playing the guitar and the keyboard and singing. “He loved spending time with his many friends in Baker City,” his family said. Survivors include his mother, Sherry Martin of Yamhill; his father, Daniel Martin of Yamhill; and grandparents living at Sisters, Baker City and Yamhill. Used with permission from: Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, October 25, 2006 Transcribed by: Belva...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles H. Meyer

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Charles H. Meyer was a German, and settled in Tucson in 1854. From 1875 he served several times as City Recorder. His court was unique; every man, when first brought before him for any misdemeanor, he would treat leniently, sometimes giving him a lecture, but for the second offense, he usually imposed a heavy fine, and in addition, would send the offender to the chain gang. If the prisoner demurred to the sentence, the judge would generally double the time on the chain gang, saying: “Veil, I gifs you thirty days more on the chain gang for contempt of de court.” By this method he kept Tucson an orderly city during his terms in office. He had the first drug store in Tucson, which he conducted for many years. One of the principal streets of the city, Meyer Street, is named for him. He died in Tucson September 7th, 1903, having been a resident of that town for forty-seven...

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Biography of Captain Thomas Jonathan Jeffords

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Captain Thomas Jonathan Jeffords was born in Chautauqua County, New York, in 1832. He laid out the road from Leavenworth, Kansas, to Denver, in 1858. In the fall of 1859 he came to Taos, New Mexico, and wintered in Taos. The following spring he went into the San Juan Mountains to prospect and mine. In 1862 he carried dispatches from Fort Thorn to General Carleton at Tucson. At that time, he was on the payroll of the United States Government as a scout, and piloted the advance companies of the California Column into New Mexico, to old Fort Thorn near the Rio Grande near Las Cruces. He is said to have taken part in the battle of Val Verde and the other engagements which resulted in the expulsion of the Confederates from New Mexico. In 1867 Captain Jeffords made the personal acquaintance of Cochise, who had been very active against all Americans and Mexicans. Of this meeting, Captain Jeffords said: “He had killed twenty-one men to my knowledge, fourteen of whom were in my employ. I made up my mind that I wanted to see him. I located one of his Indians and a camp where he came personally. In the meantime, I had acquired a smattering knowledge of the Indian language, having been an Indian...

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Biography of Henry Wickenburg

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Henry Wickenburg was a native of Austria, born in that empire in 1820. In 1847 he came to New York. He went to San Francisco in 1853, and came to Arizona in 1862. He remained at Fort Yuma for a time, then went up the river to La Paz. At La Paz, he learned that a party of explorers had left there a few days before* to go through the country to Tucson. Henry took their trail and overtook them at what is now known as Peeples’ Valley, having travelled nearly two hundred miles alone through the Apache country. After leaving Peeples ‘ Valley, the party travelled east to what is now Walnut Grove, then on to Turkey Creek and Black Canyon. Near Turkey Creek one of the party found some white quartz which had coarse gold in it. His name was Goss. He said nothing of his find to the balance of the party, but the next year he came back, and in company with Timothy Lambertson, worked some on the mine and packed the ore to Walnut Grove and arrastred it. From Black Canyon the exploring company made their way to Tucson. There Henry went to work driving a team for the United States Government. We next find him on a piece of land...

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Biography of Samuel Hughes

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Samuel Hughes, probably the oldest pioneer Arizonan now living, was born in Wales, British Isles, August 28th, 1829. In 1837 his father settled in Pennsylvania, where Mr. Hughes lived up to 1848, when he became a cabin boy on the Mississippi River, which vocation he followed until 1850, at which time he came to California overland from St. Louis. His first mining was done in Hangtown, California. In 1851 he went to Yreka, California. In 1852 he crossed the mountains to Rogue River Valley in Oregon, where he was one of the first to discover Rich Gulch at Jacksonville. In 1853 he kept Cole station at the foot of the Siskiyou Mountains, and remained there until 1856, when he returned to the Shasta Valley, and soon afterwards became interested in the stock business. In 1857 he was compelled to leave California for the milder climate of Arizona, being, at that time, in the last stages of tuberculosis. He started with a party from Yreka in that year. At Yuma it seemed that his lease of life had apparently expired, with no hope of renewal, but after a few days’ rest, the sick man determined to make one more effort to reach his destination, and started again with the party. At Maricopa Wells, about four miles east...

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Biography of William S. Oury

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now William S. Oury was born in Wythe County, Virginia, on August 13th, 1816. In early life he drifted to the west and was with General Sam Houston, at the battle of San Jacinto. He came to Arizona in 1856, and engaged in stock raising and trading. He bore his part in the early history of the Territory, and was a member of several expeditions against the Indians. He organized the expedition against the Indians which resulted in what has been called the “Camp Grant Massacre.’ ‘ The following is his own story concerning it; and is a paper read by him before the Society of Arizona Pioneers on April 6th, 1885: “Having been chosen by our President to give a paper upon some events connected with the early history of Arizona, the writer has selected for his theme the so called Camp Grant Massacre, believing it to be one of the events most important in its result to the peace and progress of our Apache cursed land. To give a mere recital of the act of killing a few more or less of the bloodthirsty savages without the details of the causes and provocations which drove a longsuffering and patient people to the adoption of remedial measures so apparently cruel in their results, would be a...

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