Location: Troy New York

Stetson Family of Bridgewater, MA

The Stetson family of Bridgewater is one of the oldest and most prominent in that section of the State, and it has for upward of two centuries been identified with the manufacturing interests of the town, its representatives being the founders of the iron industry of Bridgewater. Especial reference is made to Capt. Abisha Stetson, who was one of the first to engage in the iron business; his son, Nahum Stetson, whose name was a household word in his native town, and who by his great foresight, enterprise and progressive ideas built up the great Bridgewater Iron Works; and the latter’s sons and grandsons, all men of substance and good citizenship.

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Grinnell Family of New Bedford, MA

Since the early settlement of Newport and Portsmouth, R. I., shortly after 1638, the Grinnells have been identified with Rhode Island and Massachusetts history, the earlier generations living largely in the towns of Newport county, R. I., and for the past hundred and more years branches of this southern Rhode Island family have been representative of the best citizenship in the old Massachusetts town of New Bedford. At New Bedford lived Capt. Cornelius Grinnell, a patriot of the Revolution, and long engaged in the merchant service, who married into the old historic Howland family, and one of whose sons, Joseph Grinnell, for almost a decade represented the New Bedford district in the United States Congress, and was long prominent as a merchant and manufacturer and banker of the town; and there lived the late Lawrence Grinnell, father of the late Frederick Grinnell, who so long was at the head of the Providence Steam and Gas Pipe Company and the General Eire Extinguisher Company, a man of genius in mechanical lines, whose inventions gave him distinction, and one of whose sons, Russell Grinnell, is at this time vice president of the General Fire Extinguisher Company. It is with this New Bedford branch of the Grinnell family this article deals.

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Biography of Wolf Lewis

Wolf Lewis. The modern merchant is the man who knows what the people want and supplies the best facilities for meeting those wants. He acts on that solid commercial principle that real success is only a return for an adequate service rendered. Of Champaign merchants of this class there is no more conspicuous example than Wolf Lewis, whose department store in the large Illinois Building means to Champaign County about what the Marshall Field store means to the shopping public of Chicago. Mr. Lewis is a merchant almost by birthright, but has profited by a long and thorough experience and has been tested by the fire of adversity as well as by the stimulus of prosperity. Along with success in his private business ventures, he has combined a public spirit which has made him a factor in civic improvement and municipal betterment. He is looked upon as a man of the finest character and useful influence. Mr. Lewis is a native of Poland, where he was born May 15, 1858, a son of Reuben and Eva (Lewis) Lewis, both natives of Poland. The mother died in Poland when her son Wolf was a very small child. Reuben Lewis then immigrated to the United States, located at Troy, New York, and engaged in the wholesale dry goods business. He had left his six children behind him in Poland, and did...

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Biography of Levi Livermore Tucker

Levi Livermore Tucker, late superintendent and president of the Kansas Wesleyan Business College of Salina, devoted practically his entire life to the training of young men and women for business. Fully forty years were given to that profession, and few men accomplished a more satisfying aggregate of results in this field than Professor Tucker. He was of New England birth and ancestry. The farm in Orange County, Vermont, where he was born December 10, 1853, was also the birthplace of his father, Levi Livermore Tucker, Sr., and the house that thus served as a birthplace to these two generations was also the birthplace of Professor Tucker’s oldest living child. Mr. Tucker’s mother was Betty Putnam Carleton, also a native of Vermont. His early education Mr. Tucker acquired in the Vermont Conference Seminary at Newbury, where he was graduated with the class of 1874 at the age of twenty-one. He afterwards took a two years’ course in the Troy Rosiness College of Troy, New York, and for one year taught in the Troy Conference Business College at Courtney, Vermont. Following that came three years spent as principal of the Schofield Business College of Providence, Rhode Island. For fourteen years Mr. Tucker was principal of the New Jersey Business College at Newark, then for one year had charge of the office of a leather factory at Newark, and for ten years...

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Biography of Norman M. Ruick

This distinguished practitioner at the bar of Idaho has been connected with the leading interests of the state for some years, and in all the relations of life he has commanded the respect and confidence of his fellow men by his fidelity to duty and his devotion to the interests entrusted to his care. He comes from the far east, being a native of Connecticut. His birth occurred in Granby, that state, on the 4th of October, 1854, and his ancestry includes both Irish and Puritan stock. His paternal great-grandfather, a native of the Emerald Isle, emigrated to the New World and took up his residence in Hartford County, Connecticut, where he resided for many years. When the colonies attempted to throw off the yoke of British tyranny, he joined the army and valiantly fought in the war which gave to the nation her independence. The grandfather of our subject, William Ruick, Sr., and the father, who also bore the name of William, were both born in Granby, Connecticut, the latter on the l0th of July, 1822. He was a carriage-maker by trade and followed that pursuit in order to gain a livelihood for his family. He married Miss Temperance C. Hutchinson, a native of Mansfield, Connecticut, and a representative of one of the old Puritan families of New England. The Ruick family for several generations had been connected...

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Biography of Michael C. Normoyle

In the olden days the kings and rulers of countries erected palaces, temples or shrines in honor of themselves and to serve as monuments perpetuating their memory after they had passed away, but how much more does one do for civilization and his fellow men who aids in the substantial upbuilding of a city, the promotion of enterprises that add to its prosperity or the establishment of movements that produce progress and improvement along intellectual, social and material lines. Such Michael Charles Normoyle has done. No resident of Kendrick through the past nine years has done more for the city than he, for through the establishment and conduct of private business interests he has led to the improvement and growth of the town. He is a most loyal and public-spirited citizen, and is now the possessor of a handsome capital, which has come to him through his own labors. A bellboy in a hotel at the age of ten, he is now proprietor of the St. Elmo Hotel, one of the best in the state of Idaho, and has other extensive and profitable investments which render him the heaviest taxpayer in Kendrick. A native of Troy, New York, Mr. Normoyle was born September 8, 1853, and is of Irish lineage. His parents, John and Bessie (Clancy) Normoyle were both born in Ireland, and came to the United States with...

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Biography of William H. Stufflebeam

There is not a more popular man in Idaho either as Elk or “landlord” than William Herman Stufflebeam, proprietor of the Blackfoot Hotel, at Blackfoot; there is not a man better liked on purely personal grounds; and there is not a man to whom the citizens of Idaho would more confidently entrust the unraveling of a difficult problem or the settlement of important monetary interests than to Mr. Stufflebeam, who is a business man of careful and comprehensive training. William Herman Stufflebeam was born at Whitehall, Washington county, New York. His paternal great-grandfather and his grandfather fought together in the patriot cause during the Revolutionary struggle, the former as captain and the latter as private in his father’s company. After peace and American independence were established, these two patriot soldiers became prosperous farmers in Hudson County, New York, and upon the death of the father the old homestead descended to the son. William G. Stufflebeam, father of the subject of this review, was born in 1834 and married Miss Olive Mosher, a native of Washington County. He was long superintendent of the New York & Lake Champlain Transportation Company. In 1883, in company with his son, William Herman Stufflebeam, he came west on a prospecting tour, and bought a stock ranch twenty-five miles south of Blackfoot. In 1884 his wife and their other children came out from New York...

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Biographical Sketch of James Welch Frazier

Frazier, James Welch; consulting engineer; born, Pittsburgh, Pa., July 4, 1870; son of George G. and Sadie B. Smith Frazier; educated, Grammar and High School, Allegheny, Pa.; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; graduated, 1894, degree of Civil Engineer; married, Troy, N. Y., 1895, Jennie H. Van Deusen; two daughters, Ruth and Helen; chief engineer Federal St. & Pleasant Valley R. R., Pittsburg, 1894-1896; asst. engineer Pennsylvania Co., in office of chief engineer, 1896-1899; engineer Brown Hoisting Mchy. Co., 1899-1905; member of firm Frazier & Fox, 1905-1910; pres. The J. W. Frazier Co., 1910, to date; member of board of consulting engineers in connection with construction of Detroit-Superior High Level Bridge; director The Civic League of Cleveland; past pres. The Cleveland Engineering Society; member Rensselaer Society of Civil Engineers, American Society of Civil Engineers, and Cleveland Engineering Society; member Athletic, Colonial, City, and Automobile Clubs, Chamber of...

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Biographical Sketch of Michall F. Donovan

Donovan, Michall F.; manufacturer; born, Corning, N. Y., 1863; son of John and Mary Leary Donovan; educated, Corning, N. Y.; married, Auburn, N. Y., 1905, Margaret Holmes; learned the printer’s trade, starting when 14, and worked at it for eight years, working in large cities of New York State, Syracuse, Albany, Troy and New York City; became interested in the manufacture and sale of typewriting machines in 1885; in 1892, started the making of typewriter ribbons in Cleveland; later added the making of carbon papers; see’y and treas. The Buckeye Ribbon and Carbon Co.; member Cleveland Credit Men’s...

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Biography of Dudley Emerson Cornell, General

Gen. Dudley Emerson Cornell. The career of the late Gen. Dudley Emerson Cornell was one characterized by participation in various lines of endeavor and experiences of an interesting and extraordinary character; by faithful devotion to the duties and responsibilities of both peace and war; by success in business; and by a high type of citizenship that won to him the friendship and esteem of men in all walks of life. From 1866 until his death, in 1911, he was a resident of Kansas, and during this time was not only widely known in business circles as a man of sound ability and broad knowledge, but as a public official whose labors were always directed [p.2044] in behalf of the welfare of his community and its people. General Cornell was born on a farm near Wilton, Saratoga County, New York, January 15, 1837, being one of the four children of Merritt L. and Mercy W. (Howard) Cornell, natives respectively of New York and Vermont. He belonged to one of America’s oldest and most highly honored families, having been a descendant from Thomas Cornell, a native of England who, in 1638, to escape religious persecution, left that country and emigrated to the new land across the waters, here joining the colony of Roger Williams, which had been established two years before at Providence. He continued to worship as a Quaker during...

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Biographical Sketch of Frank Chittenden Osborn

Osborn, Frank Chittenden; civil engr.; born, Greenland, Ontonagon County, Mich., Dec. 18, 1857; son of Reuben Howard and Livonia (Chittenden) Osborn; C. E., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1880; married Annie Paull of Calumet, Mich., Oct. 27, 1880; asst. engr. Louisville Bridge & Iron Co., 1880-1885; prin. asst. engr. Keystone Bridge Co., 1885-1887; member firm G. W. G. Ferris & Co., Pittsburgh; inspector and designers of structural steel works, 1887-1889; asst, to M. J. Becker, chief engr. Ohio Connecting Ry., about four months in 1889; chief engr. King Bridge Co., Cleveland, 1889-1892; since then in private practice as consulting and designing engr. for structural steel work; pres. Osborn Engineering Co., 1900-1910; director Lake Shore Banking & Savings Co.; vice pres. American Art Stone Co.; member Cuyahoga County Bldg. Commission since 1908; member American Society C. E., Institution Civil Engineers of Great Britain, American Society Testing Materials, Cleveland Engineering Society, Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, American Railway Bridge and Building Ass’n. Mason (32nd degree). Clubs: Masonic, University, Cleveland Athletic, Chippewa. Author: Tables of Moments of Inertia and Squares of Radii of Gyration,...

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Biographical Sketch of Frank Perkins Whitman

Whitman, Frank Perkins; physicist; born, Troy, N. Y., July 29, 1853; son of William Warren and Caroline Keith (Perkins) Whitman; A. B., Brown University, 1874, A. M. 1877 (hon. Sc. D., 1900); studied Johns Hopkins; married Charlotte Webster Wheeler, of Providence, R. I., May 26, 1881; instructor in English and Classical Schools, Providence, 1874-1878; prof. physics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, 1880-1885; Western Reserve University since 1886; Fellow A. A. A. S. (vice pres. 1898); member American Physical Society, Astronomical and Astrophysical Society, America, Illuminating engineering Society. Contributor to scientific...

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Biographical Sketch of Arthur Bishop Shepherd

Shepherd, Arthur Bishop; electric machinery and building materials; born Troy, N. Y., Nov. 29, 1871; son of William A. and Martha Vail Shepard; educated, St. Paul School, Garden City, L. I.; Columbian University, Washington, D. C.; Massachusetts, Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass.; married, New York City, September, 1900, Gertrude Robins; three children; designing engineer for The General Electric Co., Schnectady, N. Y.; afterwards mgr. of their Cleveland office; with the company fourteen years; one year pres. Toledo; Chicago Interurban R. R.; at present, district mgr. for the following corporations: Wagner Electric Mnfg. Co., Asbestos Protected Metal Co., Colonial Fan & Motor Co., Wilson System Co., Sundh Electric Co., C. & C. Electric Mnfg. Co., Niles Electric Works, of G. E. Co., U. S. E. M. Co.; director Toledo & Chicago Int. R. R. R. Co.; member Electric League, of Cleveland; member Theta Phi Fraternity, and Union...

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Cooke, Susan Brewster – Obituary

Mrs. Susan E. Cooke, Kittitas Pioneer, Dies At Age Of 89. Was Resident Of Valley Since 1870; Crossed Plains In 1851; Funeral Monday; Deceased Came From Noted Family; Was Descendant Of Pilgrim Following a decline suffered nearly two years ago, Mrs. Susan Eliza Brewster Cooke, one of the oldest pioneers of Kittitas Valley, died last night at the family residence, 11 miles northeast of Ellensburg [died March 11, 1921]. Last Monday Mrs. Cooke celebrated her 89th birthday, having been born in Waterford County, four miles from Troy, New York, on March 7, 1832. Mrs. Cooke was a direct descendant of William Brewster, one of the original party of Pilgrims, and was a cousin of Jay Cooke, New York financier and railroad promoter. She was left an orphan at the age of three, and spent the following nine years at the home of her maternal grandfather at Sandusky, Ohio. Displaying the ideal pioneer spirit, she at the age of 19 left her cultured surroundings and with E. N. Cooke and his wife crossed the plains by ox team, landing near Salem, Oregon. On October 29, 1851, she was married to Charles P. Cooke at Salem, the couple then moving to a homestead near Independence, in Polk County, Oregon. After 16 years residence there they moved to the Moxee Valley in Yakima County where they lived until the spring of 1870,...

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James Harvey Todd of Dixon IL

James Harvey Todd8, (Henry7, John6, John5, John4, John3, John2, Christopher1) born Aug. 1, 1825, died Sept. 16, 1899, married Jan. 4, 1865, Charlotte T., daughter of Otis and Abigail L. (Perkins) Little, who was born Aug. 21, 1839, in Castine, Me., died June 5, 1915, in Dixon, Illinois Mr. Todd worked in New York City and Troy, N. Y., for some time at the tailors trade. He moved to Illinois in 1855, and settled in Dixon, where he kept a clothing store and was in the same building for over thirty years. His health was never good, so he led a rather quiet life. Children: 1808. Henry Otis Todd, born July 13, 1866, married April 20, 1892, Eva S. Southwell. Child: I. James Derby Todd, b. Sept. 12, 1894, m. Jan. 2, 1918, Zoe Fleming. 1809. Anna Todd, b. May 11, 1869; she has contributed much data relating to her branch of the family, resides in Dixon, Ill. She m. Oct. 21, 1916, Robert W. Sproul. 1810. Emma Howell Todd, b. May 7, 1873, m. Oct. 23, 1901, Charles A. Johnson; twin with next. 1811. Elmer Ely Todd, born May 7, 1873, married March 9, 1904, Relura P. Hunt. Children: I. Charles Hunt Todd, b. June 4, 1906. II. Thomas Todd, b. Dec. 22, 1908. III. Lucy Todd, b. March 29, 1915. 1812. Elizabeth Anderson Todd, b. Dec. 17,...

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