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Location: Tombstone Arizona

Biography of James O’Neill

James O’Neill came to the northwest from the far-off Atlantic coast: nor have his travels been limited by his journey across the continent, for he spent some time among the mountains in the distant south. He was born in Rondout, New York, May 6, 1861 his parents being Patrick and Hannah (Mullroy) O’Neill, natives of Ireland. Both crossed the Atlantic to the United States in childhood, and were reared, educated and married in the Empire state. The father, who was a tanner by trade, died when our subject was only about five years old leaving the mother to care for her five small children. She lived to be fifty-five years of age and departed this life in Jarmyn, Pennsylvania. When a mere lad of seven summers James O’Neill began to earn his own living in the coal breakers of Pennsylvania, receiving forty-two cents per day for his services. His youth was one of hard toil and his entire life has been one of diligence. In 1879 he left the east and went to the Black Hills, settling at Lead City, South Dakota, where he engaged in mining for a year. He then went to Tombstone, Arizona, where he followed mining for a short time, after which he made his way to the Coeur d’Alene country on the discovery of the rich mineral deposits there. Later he was identified with...

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Biography of John P. Clum

John P. Clum, of San Bernardino, was born in Claverack, Columbia County, New York, in 1851, and his childhood and youth were passed on the banks of the historic Hudson. At the age of nineteen he graduated at the Hudson River Institute, and entered the freshman class of Rutger’s College, New Brunswick, New Jersey. After completing the first year and creditably passing all the examinations, adverse fortune compelled him to leave college, and in 1871 he entered the meteorological service of the United States Government. Having taken a course in meteorology and signaling, he was ordered to Santa Fe, New Mexico, and there opened a station for meteorological observations in November 1871. He was honored with the appointment as delegate to the Presbyterian General Assembly, held at Baltimore in 1873, and at St. Louis in 1874. On February 26, 1874, he was appointed Indian Agent of the Apaches at San Carlos, Arizona, and discharged the difficult duties of the office with remarkable fidelity and efficiency, and to the great satisfaction of the citizens of Arizona and Colorado. February 26, 1876, Mr. Clum resigned the agency, but finally, at the urgent request of the department, withdrew his resignation in October following. He resigned again in March, 1877, and left the agency July 1, 1877. In November 1876, Mr. Clum was united in marriage, at Delaware, Ohio, with Miss Mary D....

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Biographical Sketch of Richard Gird

Richard Gird is the well-known owner of the Chino Ranch, San Bernardino County. The few facts obtained in regard to his life and successful career form an interesting chapter in this Memorial History. Mr. Gird was born in Herkimer County, New York, in 1836. His father, John Gird, was a native of New Jersey, a farmer by occupation, and to that calling he reared his son, giving him the benefits of such an education as could be procured in the common schools. The subject of this sketch was of studious habits and disposition, and made the best of his advantages. He devoted considerable attention to the study of mechanics and other scientific studies. Of an ambitious disposition and desirous of a more extended field of operations, he sought the far West, and when less than seventeen years of age, in 1852, he came by steamer to California. Soon after his arrival he went to mining in El Dorado County. After some months in that calling he located on the Russian river in Sonoma County, and engaged in farming and stock raising. In 1858 he embarked for South America, and upon his arrival there was for several months engaged in prospecting for mineral wealth, after which he engaged in railroad building, under the old California pioneer, Harry Meigs. A year spent in South America satisfied him, and after a short...

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