Location: Sullivan County NH

Biographical Sketch of Rev. N. R. Nichols

Rev. N. R. Nichols was pastor of the Congregational church at Norwich village from February, 1880, to May, 1904, after completing a seven years’ pastorate at Barnet, Vermont, which was preceded by brief pastorates at Westfield, Massachusetts, and Acworth, New Hampshire. During his term of nearly a quarter of a century here in Norwich, Mr. Nichols faithfully cared for the interests committed to his charge, as the one hundred and ninety-five accessions to his church during his pastorate amply indicate. Not alone to matters connected with his church did he give his attention, but, as well, to those of...

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Biography of George Musalas Colvocoresses

Born in Scio, Grecian Archipelago, October 22, 1816. During the Greek Revolution the Turks invaded that island in 1822, and after narrowly escaping the massacre that followed, George with his mother and two young sisters were carried captives to Smyrna. Through friends in that city he was ransomed and sent in an American brig to Baltimore; much kindness was shown him by members of the Greek Relief Committee, and the story of his misfortunes excited the sympathy of Captain Alden Partridge, head of the military academy then at Norwich, who offered to receive and provide for young Colvocoresses as...

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Blaisdell Family of Norwich Vermont

Michael Blaisdell, the progenitor of the family in Norwich, came from Plainfield, N. H., in the year 1813, and settled on the farm where Henry S. Goddard now lives. His sons were Jonathan, Levi, Stephen, and Thomas. Of these Levi and Stephen spent their lives in town and reared large...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Frances Noble – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the captivity of Frances Noble, who was, among others, taken by the Indians from Swan Island, in Maine, about the year 1755; compiled by John Kelly, Esq. of Concord, New Hampshire, from the minutes and memoranda of Phinehas Merrill. Esq. of Stratham, in the same state; and by the Former Gen. Tleman communicated for publication to the editors of the Historical Collections of New Hampshire.

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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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Biography of Danford Rice

Danford Rice, late a well-known farmer of Claremont, who died August 4, 1877, was born in this town, December 2, 1805. His grandfather, Ebenezer Rice, who was one of the earliest settlers of Claremont, coming with a little colony of pioneers from Tolland, Conn., bought considerable land in the village, but afterward removed to West Claremont. He was a carpenter by trade, and framed the old Union church at West Claremont. He was a Deacon of the church, and in the absence of a minister he used to read the services. A stanch patriot, he fought for American independence in the Revolution. His death occurred April 24, 1829. His children were: Joseph; Stephen; Ebenezer; and Phebe, who became Mrs. Timothy Grannis. His son Joseph was a prosperous farmer, a man of influence in the town, and one of the leading members of the Union Church. He married Lucy Barron, who was born June 14, 1772. He died April 24, 1829, his wife surviving him until August 28, 1847. They had a large family of children. Minerva, the eldest, born November 30, 1795, married Daniel Bond. Horace was born July 2, 1801. He died in Cambridge, Mass., in 1872. Franklin was born May 2, 1803; and Sanford and Danford, twins, were born December 2, 1805. Sanford was lost in the Mexican War. Phebe Pamelia was born January 18, 1809, and...

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Biography of Abiathar Richards

Abiathar Richards, a retired merchant of Newport, was born here, October 8, 1825, son of Seth and Fanny Richards, of Dedham, Mass. He is descended from Edward Richards, one of the twelve immigrants bearing that surname, who, England to this country at different times in the period between 1630 and 1728, and whose descendants are to-day represented in the learned professions, the arts, commerce, and the general business of the country. Edward Richards, who arrived in 1632, was the sixth of the twelve referred to. With him, a fellow-passenger on the ship “Lion,” was his brother Nathaniel, who afterward joined the party led by the Rev. Mr. Hooker through the wilderness to the valley of the Connecticut, and was among the founders of Hartford. While a resident of Cambridge, Mass., on September 10, 1638, Edward married Susan Hunting. He was afterward one of the sixty-two original proprietors of the town of Dedham, near Boston, where many of his descendants are to be found to-day. He spent the rest of his life in Dedham, and died there in 1684. From Edward the line of descent comes through John (first), John (second), John (third), and Abiathar to the sixth generation, represented by Sylvanus, who in the beginning of this century moved with his family to Newport, N.H., and settled on a large tract of land in the western part of the...

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Biography of Amos Richardson

Amos Richardson, an influential resident of Cornish, was born here, November 27, 1817, son of Amos and Sophia (Cummings) Richardson. He is a descendant of Dr. Amos Richardson, who was a physician of note in Pelham, N.H. Dr. Amos’s son, Joseph, was grandfather of the subject of this sketch. Joseph’s children were: Miriam, Joseph, David, Josiah, Sarah, Mercy, Rebecca, and Amos. Miriam, now deceased, was the wife of Joshua Wyman, of Pelham, and the mother of seven children; Joseph married Polly Hilliard, of Cornish, and had a family of twelve children; David, now deceased, married Sarah Ford, and was the father of seven children; Josiah, who was unmarried, is deceased; Sarah married John Huggins, and is now deceased; Mercy, who married Aaron Hibbard, had no children, and is now deceased; Rebecca, who never married, lived to be eighty-two years of age. Amos Richardson, Sr., a native of Pelham, born in November, 1785, moved to Cornish with his parents when only four years of age. After finishing his education, which was obtained in the town schools, he went to Massachusetts; but after a while, at the urgent request of his parents, he came back to carry on the farm, the present homestead of his son. He was very prominent in the town, and was much interested in town affairs. He was Tax Collector for a number of years, also Selectman;...

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Biography of Timothy B. Rossiter

Timothy B. Rossiter, one of the wealthiest men in Claremont, was born there, September 18, 1807, son of Sherman and Olive (Baldwin) Rossiter. Sir Edward Rossiter, the founder of the family, with his son and son’s wife, Dr. and Mrs. Bray Rossiter, embarked from Plymouth, England, on the ship “Mary and John,” March 20, 1630, and arrived at Nantasket, Mass., May 30, 1630. They began a settlement at Mattapan, and in the spring of 1636 removed to Windsor, Conn. Sir Edward Rossiter, who was chosen in London in 1629 to serve as an assistant to Governor Winthrop, died soon after his arrival in the colonies. Dr. Bray Rossiter, his son, removed in 1650 to Guilford, Conn., where he became a planter, and purchased in 1651 the Desbourough estate. Dr. Rossiter died September 30, 1672, leaving ten children. Josiah Rossiter, a son of the Doctor, born at Windsor, removed with his father to Guilford. For ten years, between the years 1700 and 1711, he was Assistant Governor in the colony of Connecticut, and for some years Recorder and Justice of the Peace. He had seventeen children. His death occurred January 31, 1716. Theophilus, his son, born February 12, 1696, married Abigail Pierson, November 18, 1725, became the father of fourteen children, and died April 9, 1770. His son, Captain William, who was born February 11, 1740, married Submit Chittenden, February...

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Biography of John P. Rounsevel

John P. Rounsevel, formerly a well-known wool buyer of Claremont, was born in Unity, N.H., January 2, 1815, son of Royal and Betsey (Sweat) Rounsevel. Rounseville, the original spelling of the name, was changed to the present form by Joseph Rounsevel about the year 1768. In 1749 Thomas Rounseville wrote from Ottery St. Mary to Philip Rounseville, of England, who afterward came to this country. He settled in Freetown, Mass., and was called by the townspeople King Philip. His son Joseph, who, born January 3, 1737, died in 1827, went to Washington, N.H., between 1768 and 1772, from Middleboro, Mass., having previously resided in East Freetown. Joseph was a good farmer, a well-read man, and a Justice of the Peace. He executed the legal business of the town, and represented Washington with other towns in the General Court. His children were: Alden, Charity, Phebe, John, Rosamond, and Royal. Alden married Hannah Wells. Charity married Manasseh Farnsworth in 1784. Phebe never married. John married Rebecca Chamberlain in 1768. Rosamond married Thomas Putnam in 1787. Royal’s children were: Joseph, Minerva, Elle I., Lyman, and John P. Of them Joseph, who was born in 1796, and died December 24, 1858, married Betsey Laughton, who had by him five children-Sarah, Harriet, Holmes, Lyman, and Marinda. Minerva, born in 1799, who married John Stowell, had no children, and died in July, 1848. Elle I.,...

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Biography of Captain Eleazar L. Sarsons

Captain Eleazar L. Sarsons, a well-known resident of Acworth and a veteran of the Civil War, was born in Lyme, N.H., August 9, 1836, son of Leon and Flora Ella (Prue) Sarsons. His father, who was born in France in the year 1800, emigrated to Canada in 1828, and in 1834 moved to Sheffield, Vt. He was a shoemaker by trade, and followed this handicraft in connection with farming for some time. He later plied his calling in Lyme, N.H., and other places; and in 1871 he came to Acworth, where he spent the rest of his life. He married Flora Ella Prue, who was born in Canada in 1815. They became the parents of ten children, as follows: Mary; Elinore; Eleazar L., the subject of this sketch; Flora, who was born in 1834, and died in Wheelock, Vt., in 1841; Adeline; Marguerite; William H.; George W., who died in Pennsylvania, December 6, 1880; Ella, born in Barre, Vt., in April, 1852; and Charles, who was born in Orange, Vt., in 1860, and died in 1868. Mary Sarsons became the wife of Henry Townes, of Lake Village, N.H. Her husband died July 1, 1896; and she is now residing in Nashua, N.H. Elinore married George W. Newell, of Nashua, and died May 3, 1889. Adeline married John Williams. Marguerite, who married John Clark, died June 28, 1880. William H.,...

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Biographical Sketch of Solomon Stone

Solomon Stone was born in Plainfield, November 6, 1811, and died January 12, 1892. His wife, born in Cornish, June 11, 1813, still lives in Plainfield, enjoying good health and able to do nearly all her own work without assistance. Mr. Chadbourne’s mother, Sally Cady, was born in Cornish, August 29, 1790, and died December 16, 1864. Grandfather Cady was the first of the name to come to Cornish. He was born in 1743; and his wife was Hannah Hutchins, born in 1746. Grandfather Cady rode from Connecticut by marked trails. For a riding whip he had a willow stick; and when he alighted from his horse in Cornish he stuck the whip into the ground by his future home, and there has always been a willow-tree there since. When he came here, he brought with him a silver 1750. Mr. Chadbourne received at his birth from his grandfather Cady a silver dollar bearing the date of...

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Biography of George Henry Stowell

George Henry Stowell, a wholesale and retail dealer in hardware and one of the wealthiest citizens of Claremont, was born in Cornish, N.H., October 28, 1835. His father, Amasa Stowell, came to Cornish from Hartland, Vt. He died when our subject was a young boy. He had ten children, of whom five are living, namely: Evaline, who married G. W. Hewey; Sylvester, who is engaged in agriculture in East Unity, N.H.; Joseph, who is in the harness and livery and carriage business at Lawrence, owns three livery stables, and raises fast stock; Austin, who is in business with Joseph; and George H., the subject of this sketch. Carrie, who married Calvin Adams, is recently deceased. George H. Stowell received a commonschool education in his native town. In 1854 he embarked in the business of making monuments and headstones at Springfield, Vt. He came in 1860 to Claremont, where he purchased the marble business of J. A. & J. F. Davis. This he conducted until February, 1864, when he bought the hardware business of Levi Brown, and began to carry it on in his own name on the site of his present store. Starting with a small capital, he has by energy and ability built up what is claimed to be the largest wholesale and retail business in this part of the State, and amassed one of the largest fortunes...

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Biography of William Cant Sturoc

William Cant Sturoc, “the bard of Sunapee ,” as he is often called, was born November 4, 1822, in a humble, straw-thatched cottage in Arbroath, Scotland, son of Francis Sturoc and his wife, Ann (Cant) Sturoc. Doubtless, the poetic genius has descended to him from his paternal great-grandfather, James Sturoc, who wrote a book of “Hymns and Spiritual Songs,” and died in Panbride in 1750. Other distinguished members of the family were well known in the church. Among these was the Rev. David Sturoc, who was of ready speech and pen, and two generations ago repeatedly entered public debate with the renowned Dr. Wardlow, of Glasgow. Francis, the father of William, was well known as highly cultured and profoundly read, although throughout his life he followed mercantile occupations. Cantsland, an ancient estate in Kincardineshire, now in other hands, was for several hundred years in the possession of the Cants, the mother’s family. James Cant, the maternal grandfather of William C., and a resident St. Cyrus in the same county, was cousin to the famous Immanuel Cant, or Kant, who died in 1804. James had four daughters-Helen, Ann, Margaret, and Jane. His only son, John, died in Bridgeport, Conn. Ann Cant married Francis Sturoc, December 19, 1808, and to them were born ten children. The father died in 1851, aged seventy-seven years, after surviving the mother some years. William Cant,...

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Biography of Nathaniel Tolles, M.D.

Nathaniel Tolles, M.D., was for many years one of the most prominent physicians and surgeons of Claremont. A native of Weathersfield, Vt., he was born September 17, 1805, son of John Tolles. His father, an industrious farmer, moved from Weathersfield to Claremont about the year 1819. His grandfather, Henry Tolles, was a member of Captain William Upham’s company during the Revolutionary War. Young Nathaniel Tolles availed himself of the advantages for obtaining an education offered by the Catholic Seminary in this town, then in charge of the Rev. Daniel Barber. Here he fitted for college, and was about to enter upon his classical course, when a severe illness, resulting from a too close application to study, prevented him from carrying out his purpose. Afterward, for a period, he assisted his father upon the farm in the summer and taught school in the winter. Beginning in 1827 he studied medicine under Dr. James Hall, of Windsor, Vt., for two years. Then for a short time he was under the instruction of Dr. Charles G. Adams, of Keene, N.H. Subsequently he attended lectures at Bowdoin and Dartmouth Universities; and he graduated from the last-named college in November, 1830. Immediately after leaving college, he was appointed resident physician at the South Boston Almshouse, where he remained six months. In September, 1831, he located for practice in Reading, Vt. Unable to consult more...

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