Location: Suffolk County MA

Biographical Sketch of Allen, Horace G.

Allen, Horace G., son of Stephen M. Allen, was born at Jamaica Plain (Boston), July 27, 1855. His preparatory studies were pursued in the common schools. He was graduated L.L.B. from the Harvard law school in 1876; then became associated with Nathan Morse, Boston. He was admitted to the Suffolk bar in 1877. Later, he became law partner with Mr. Morse, under the firm name of Morse & Allen, with whom he still remains in practice of the law. Mr. Allen was married in Brunswick, Me, April 28, 1881, to Grace D., daughter of Gen. Joshua L. Chamberlain. Mr. Allen is a member of the Boston Art Club, Boston Athletic Association, and Curtis Club. In 1888 and ’89 he was elected a member of the Boston common council, and in the latter year, after a protracted contest, was chosen president of that body, January 11th. In this responsible position he has displayed marked ability, and has already acquired a reputation for tact and fairness greatly to his credit. His residence is in...

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Biographical Sketch of Adams, Charles R.

Adams, Charles R., son of Charles and Eliza Ann Adams, was born in Charlestown, Middlesex County, February 10, 1834. His early education was received at the grammar school, Charlestown, and at Wesleyan Academy, Wilbraham. He early developed musical talents, and his first teacher of vocal music was Mr. Edwin Bruce of Boston, then afterwards Mme. Arnoult, and for a number of years his voice was frequently heard in the concert halls of Boston and vicinity. During several years he sustained the tenor roles in the oratorio performance of the Handel and Haydn Society, to the satisfaction of the public, upon which his hold became very strong. Having chosen music as his profession, Mr. Adams studied and traveled with Prof. Mulder, formerly one of the professors of the Royal Opera, Paris, and accompanied him to Europe. Prior to sailing for Europe they gave a series of concerts through the United States, which were very successful, the tour extending to Canada; and from St. John they sailed for Barbadoes, West Indies, giving concerts at all the islands. Mr. Adams afterwards went to London and Amsterdam, meeting at the latter place Professor Mulder, who had preceded him thither, and with him went on a concert tour through Holland, receiving at that time from Vienna an invitation to sing at the Austrian capital, in “Sonnambula: with Mlle. Artot. After learning the opera in...

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Biographical Sketch of Alden, Lewis

Alden, Lewis, son of Lewis and Abigail (Belcher) Alden, was born in East Randolph, Norfolk County, April 29, 1848. He received a common and high school education. Between the ages of seventeen and twenty-one he worked in the shoe factory of L. F. Wilde & Co. Later, for nearly five years. He worked for Rufus Gibbs & Co., boot and shoe jobbing house, Boston—most of the time in charge of their factory at South Weymouth. He established himself in business in Holbrook, 1878, entering his present factory (boots and shoes) 1885. Mr. Alden was married in Saugus, June 1874, to Harriet S. Hammond. Of this union is one child; Mabel Frances Alden. Mr. Alden is trustee of the Holbrook public library. He was largely instrumental in founding the Holbrook Methodist church, and has been for ten years superintendent of the Sunday school. He is always alive and active in promoting the temperance cause. He is a director in the Holbrook Co-operative Bank, a charter member of the Knights of Honor, having passed through every grade of...

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Biography of Adams, Charles Francis

Adams, Charles Francis, second son of Charles Francis and Abigail Brown (Brooks) Adams, was born in Boston, May 27, 1835. He entered Harvard College in 1852, and graduated in 1856. Choosing the law for his profession, he entered, as a student, the office of Richard H. Dana, Jr., of Boston. He was admitted to the bar May 7 1858. In February 1860, he was admitted to practice at the bar of the United States Supreme Court. The same year he resigned his military commission which he held as adjutant of the 2d regiment, M. V. M., with rank of Lieutenant. Later, he took a trip through the West in company with Senator Seward, during which he contribute to the New York papers several articles upon the political prospects of that region. In December, 1861, he was commissioned as first lieutenant in the 1st Massachusetts cavalry, and received his commission as captain in October, 1862. He participated in all the actions of his command, and was on every march during the war. In January 1864, the company which he commanded – company D – re-enlisted as a company, and came home on a furlough under his command. They were publicly received in Boston, January 23, with an escort, and were welcomed in Faneuil Hall with speeches from the governor and other representative men. He was finally mustered out of the...

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Biographical Sketch of Allen, Frank Dewey

Allen, Frank Dewey, son of Charles Francis and Olive Ely (Dewey) Allen, was born in Worcester, August 16, 1850. He was educated in the Worcester high school; was graduated from Yale in the class of 1873, and from the Boston University law school in 1875; was managing clerk in the offices of Hillard, Hyde & Dickinson, Boston, remaining with them until 1878, when he was admitted to the Suffolk county bar. Upon severing his connection with Hillard, Hyde & Dickinson, he opened an office for himself in Boston, where he has ever since been located as attorney and counselor-at-law. Mr. Allen was married in Lynn, January 9, 1878, to Lucy, daughter of Trevett M. and Eliza (Munroe) Rhodes. They have no children. In 1884 Mr. Allen organized the Massachusetts Temperance Home for Inebriates, which is located at Lynn. He was made its president, which position he still holds. He served one year as clerk of the Washington Street Baptist church, Lynn, when he resigned from pressure of other duties. He was elected from Lynn to the House of Representatives in 1881 to ’82, serving on the judiciary committee and acting as its clerk, also on the committee on the removal of Judge Day, the congressional re-districting committee, and the committee on banks and banking. He served on the Republican state central committee from the 1st Essex senatorial district for...

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Biographical Sketch of Adams, Charles Follen

Adams, Charles Follen, son of Ira and Mary Elizabeth (Senter) Adams, was born in Dorchester, Norfolk County, April 21, 1842. He was the youngest but one of ten children, and has now five sisters and three brothers living. He received a common school education, and leaving the grammar school in Dorchester at fifteen years of age, went as a boy into the well-known house of N. D. Whitney & Co., Boston, to learn the business. He was afterwards salesman in the same house, then went into business for himself with John D. Clapp, under the firm name of J. D. Clapp & Co. In 1872 he became a partner in the firm of Nicholson & Adams, hair goods for ladies’ wear, and later on made a change in business to that of furnishing supplies for the five, ten and twenty-five cent counters that have had such a phenomenal run – the firm name being Newell, Adams & Co. He sold out his interest January 1, 1885, and is now doing a manufacturing and commission business, in addition to his journalistic work. At the age of twenty, in August, 1862, he enlisted in the 13th regiment Massachusetts volunteers, and was in the battles of Second Bull Run, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg – wounded in the latter and held prisoner for three days, when he was re-captured and taken to the...

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Biography of George Walker

George Walker (known during his residence in the county as Judge Walker) was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1774. His father, John Walker, came of an old family in Leicestershire, England, was a graduate of the university of Edinburgh, and a barrister at law, removed to America in 1753, married in Boston, and settled in Hartford, Connecticut. George received a good business education, and engaged in mercantile business in Cooperstown, New York. For several years he was highly successful, but, through the dishonesty of a partner, he became deeply involved, and was compelled to close business at a great sacrifice. Disheartened by his losses, and soured by the meanness and dishonesty of his late associates, he determined to seek his fortune in a newer country, and came to Athens county in 1804. Here he purchased and settled on a farm near the present town of Amesville, where he remained all his life. The country was almost a wilderness, and the farm uncultivated, nor had the owner any practical knowledge of the work before him. Mrs. L. W. Ryors, to whom we are indebted for the substance of this sketch, says: “I have heard my mother say that, had it not been for the aid of the man who accompanied them in their long journey as a driver of a wagon, they would have suffered. His name was William Hassey,...

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Biography of John W. Perkins, M. D.

Dr. John W. Perkins, division surgeon for the Kansas division of the union Pacific Railroad since 1887 and a physician ‘and surgeon of pronounced ability, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, July 1, 1860, a son of David and Hannah (Dunn) Perkins, who were natives of New Hampshire and of Maine, respectively. The father was contractor and builder who devoted his life to the business following his marriage, previous to which time he had been a sea captain, sailing out of Boston to the West Indies and in the coastwise trade. He came of a family of seagoing people, but after his marriage, preferring to be with his family, he took up building operations in Boston. His son, Dr. John W. Perkins, completed a course in the Boston Latin school and then entered Harvard, in which he completed his classical course by graduation in 1882 with the Bachelor of Arts degree, while in 1886 he won the M. D. degree. He later served as house physician in the Boston Children’s Hospital and was after ward house surgeon for a year and nine months in the Boston City Hospital. On the expiration of that period he was appointed surgeon for the Union Pacific Railway at Kansas City and removed to the middle west in 1887. He has since acted in this capacity, or for a period of more than a third...

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Biography of Julius Terrass Willard, Prof.

Not so many years ago many men regarded the application of science to agriculture as an idle theory and it is within the lifetime of such men as Prof. Julius Terrass Willard, dean of the division of general science, professor of chemistry, and chemist of the agricultural experiment station, in the Kansas State Agricultural College, at Manhattan, that these doubters have been convinced. Applied science had not only revolutionized many phases of agriculture but is bringing this most important of industries to the forefront in scholarly study and research. America had held her position for many years as a granary of the world, but future conditions will tax her power to produce crops and livestock, and the cry for food from hungry people in this and other lands may find no adequate supply. To such men as Professor Willard the country must turn for expert assistance in preventing this condition. Julius Terrass Willard was born on a farm near Wabaunsee, in Wabaunsee County, Kansas, April 9, 1862, and is a son of Julius F. and Mary Elizabeth (Terrass) Willard. The progenitor of the Willard family, Simon Willard, came from England to Massachusetts in May, 1634, settling near Boston. The name is well and favorably known in New England to the present day. Julius F. Willard, father of Professor Willard, was born in Farmington, Connecticut, August 2, 1835, and, as...

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Biography of Andrew McGregor

This doughty end intrepid frontiersman, now one of the leading farmers and stock men of his vicinity, having a tine estate eight miles west from Ontario, which is the family home, and being a man of prominence and capabilities, has accomplished much in the development of the County and we are pleased to accord to him a representation in the history of Malheur County. Mr. McGregor was born in Glasgow, Scotland on June 28, 1845, being the son of Duncan and Marguerette (McIntyre) McGregor. The father was born in Inverness, north Scotland, on February 14, 1800 and the mother was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on August 27, 1865. In 1846 the family came to America in a sailing vessel, being six weeks on the trip. Landing in New York, they made their way to Boston, where the father worked at block printing and dyeing in a calico factory. In 1849 marks the date when they came to the vicinity of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and there on August 14, 1862, he enlisted in Company K, Twentieth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, being mustered in at Camp Randall, Madison, Wisconsin, and went thence to the barracks at St. Louis, and served under General Schofield in the First Brigade, Second Division, Army of the Frontier. He participated in the battle of Prairie Grove; Arkansas, December 7, 1862, was in the third siege of Vicksburg in...

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Biographical Sketch of William M. Mangin

The subject of this article is one of the oldest pioneers of Jordan Valley, a man of ability and worth. one who has wrought here with assiduity and sagacity since the early days, is now recognized as one of the prominent men of the County, has ever maintained an unsullied reputation and manifested a stanch character of uprightness and integrity, and in business circles has won a success that is a credit to any man, therefore he is deserving of a prominent posit don in the history of his County and it is with pleasure that we accord him such at this time. William Mangin was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on March 16, 183o, being the son of James and Elizabeth Mangin, natives of Ireland and Nova Scotia respectively. Our subject received his education at his native place and at the early age of sixteen years he embarked on the schooner, Boston, which went to Newfoundland to load with codfish for Gibraltar; thence to Madrid where they loaded with fruit and wine for America. Returning to Boston, he then went to Mobile for a load of cotton, then transferred, after a summer spent on the bay, to another ship, the Dublin, and went with a cargo of cotton to Liverpool. Returning to New York, he made another trip to Liverpool, then made several trips to foreign countries, as West...

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Biography of Atherton, Cornelius

Cornelius Atherton came in from Pennsylvania in 1803 or ‘4. He was born in Cambridge, Mass., in 1736, and was the fourth in descent from Gen. Humphrey Atherton of Boston, from whom all the Athertons in America are descended. He married Mary Delano and with her removed to Amenia, Dutchess Co., N. Y., in 1763. He was a blacksmith by trade, and having discovered the process of converting iron into American steel, in 1772 he entered into a contract with the Messrs. Reed, merchants of that place, to superintend the erection of steel works, to be constructed by them, and to instruct their workmen in the art. The works were erected and were in successful operation during the war of the Revolution. From Amenia he returned to Cambridge, where he superintended an armory belonging to John and Samuel Adams and John Hancock, which was burned by the British soldiers during the Revolutionary war. Thence, in 1775 or ‘6, he removed to Plymouth, Luzerne Co., Pa., where he worked at his trade. He was drafted at the time of the Wyoming massacre, but his place was filled by his eldest son, Jabez, who volunteered to become his substitute, and was accepted and mustered in. The youthful patriot fell in that sanguinary engagement and his name heads the list on the Wyoming monument. Atherton’s wife, by whom he had seven children,...

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Biography of William Waddell Duke, M.D.

Dr. William Waddell Duke, physician of Kansas City, was born in Lexington, Missouri, a son of Henry Buford and Susan (Waddell) Duke, the former a native of Louisville, Kentucky, and the latter of Lexington, Missouri. The father, now retired, was a manufacturer of farm implements and harness of the firm of Buford & George Manufacturing Company. Dr. Duke attended the Kansas City schools until graduated from the high school with the class of 1901. He next entered Yale University and gained his Ph. B. degree in 1904, while in 1908 Johns Hopkins University conferred upon him the M. D. degree, following the completion of the regular four years course in that institution. He next entered the Massachusetts General Hospital as an interne and was graduated in 1910, while in 1911 he did postgraduate work in the University of Vienna. He was voluntary assistant in research at the University of Tubingen, Wurttemberg, in 1912, and since then has devoted his attention to the practice of medicine. He has carried on a consulting practice in internal medicine in Kansas City from 1912 to the present time and has manifested a most active and helpful interest in medical research since entering upon the study o1 medicine and has contributed much to the current literature of the profession. He is the author of a monograph entitled, “Oral Sepsis in Its Relationship to Systemic Disease,”...

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Biography of Alfred A. Plummer, Sr.

ALFRED A. PLUMMER, Sr. – This pioneer of the port of entry was born at Alfred, Maine, March 3, 1822. He was the son of John and Eliza Adams Plummer, of an old family of the Pine Tree state. In early life young Plummer removed to Boston and learned the saddlery and harness trade, thereby acquiring practical ideas, and the facile use of his hands, which fitted him for the varied work of the pioneer on our coat. In 1849 he left for the Pacific shores, coming with the argonauts who steered their way across the seas of grass, and the deserts of the West, – one of those hardy, keen characters that find a world of resources within their own hearts and minds sufficient for any demand to be made upon a human being; and he most fully justified this confidence in his after career. At San Francisco he engaged for a time in the hotel business, but, feeling the drift of destiny still farther up the coast, boarded in 1850 the brig Emory, Captain Balch, and arrived in the Strait April 24th. The present site of the Port was then wholly uninhabited; but, seeing its great natural advantages as the first really practicable landing at the entrance of the Sound waters, he laid there his Donation claim, and with Charles Batchelder became the first settler of the...

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Biographical Sketch of Gustave Rosenthal

GUSTAVE ROSENTHAL. – This well-known merchant was born in Bavaria on the 4th of July, 1840. He continued to live in his native country until 1856. In that year he emigrated to America. The first three years of his stay he spent in Boston. Then, removing to the city of New York, he was engaged in mercantile business until 1861. In September of that year he came by the Panama route to California; and two years later he resumed his journeyings, coming to a final pause at Olympia, Washington Territory. There he soon embarked in the business of general merchandising in partnership with Isaac Lightner. In 1874 Mr. Rosenthal purchased the interest of his partner, and has since conducted the business independently, being now one of the oldest business men in Olympia. In 1869 the office of county treasurer was conferred on Mr. Rosenthal. The wife of Mr. Rosenthal was Miss Katie Bettman, to whom he was united at Olympia, and by whom he now has an interesting family of four children, Bertha, Samuel, Caroline and...

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