Location: Suffolk County MA

Biographical Sketch of Richard Frederick Fuller

RICHARD FREDERICK FULLER was the fourth son. He graduated at Harvard University, 1844, studied law in Greenfield, Mass., afterwards a year at the Harvard Law School, and, having completed his studies in the office of his uncle, Henry H. Fuller, Esq., in Boston, was admitted to the bar on examination in open court, December, 1846, at the age of twenty-two. He became, and continued for two years to be, the law partner of his uncle, and subsequently practiced law with success in Boston. Having been fitted for college, at the age of sixteen he entered a store in Boston, at the solicitation of his family; but mercantile life proving distasteful to him, be relinquished it at the end of one year. By severe application, he in six months made up for this lost year, at the same time keeping pace with the studies of the Sophomore class, and was admitted to college in the middle of the Sophomore year. He graduated the second or third scholar of his class. He died at his country home in Wayland, May 30, 1869. He had a taste for literature, was deeply religious, and an ardent lover of nature. One of his greatest pleasures was to walk in the early morning through woods and fields accompanied by his...

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Biography of Charles Eastman Staniels

Charles Eastman Staniels, a prominent life insurance agent of Concord, N.H., was born in Lowell, Mass., December 27, 1844, son of Edward L. and Ruth Bradley (Eastman) Staniels. The father, born in Chichester, N.H., for many years was interested in the drug business, successively in Lowell and Boston, Mass. Toward the latter part of his life he removed to Roxbury, Mass., then a suburb of Boston, and died there at the age of sixty-five years. He was twice married. By his first wife there were three children, all of whom are now dead. His second marriage was made with Ruth Bradley Eastman, now over eighty-five years old, whose only child is the subject of this sketch. A daughter of General Isaac Eastman, of Concord, N.H., she is a direct descendant, in the sixth generation, of Captain Ebenezer Eastman, the first settler of Concord, and of Captain Edward Johnson, the historian of Woburn, Mass., one of the commissioners appointed by the General Court of Massachusetts Bay Colony to fix the northern boundary of that colony in 1652. In 1833 a large boulder was discovered at the entrance of Lake Winnepesaukee at Weirs, N.H., bearing the initials of Governor John Endicott, with those of the commissioners, Captain Edward Johnson and Captain Symon Willard, which had remained unnoticed and subject to elemental conditions for one hundred and eighty-one years. The State of...

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Biography of Henry Tubbs

Henry Tubbs, a successful dentist practising in Newport, was born in Peterboro, N.H., February 24, 1831, son of Joseph and Azuba (Monroe) Tubbs. The family is traced back to one William Tubbs, who came to the Plymouth Colony from London, England, in 1635. The paternal grandfather of Dr. Tubbs was Captain Joseph Tubbs, of Marlow, N.H., an early settler, a successful farmer, a good citizen, and a Captain in the old State militia. He died at the age of eighty years. Joseph Tubbs, son of Captain Tubbs, in company with Thomas Baker owned the Eagle Mills at Peterboro, N.H., where he manufactured cotton goods, ginghams, etc., from the rough cotton. Successful at first, the firm met with disasters from various causes; and the business was wound up after several years of existence. Joseph Tubbs then turned his May 22, 1859, at the age of seventy years and three months. His wife was a daughter of Dr. Joseph Monroe, of Hillsborough. She died at Hancock, N.H., January 16, 1871, at the age of seventy-five years and eight months. They were both Unitarians. They had six children, of whom three are deceased, namely: Thomas B., who died in 1894, seventy-nine years old; Elijah M. Tubbs, who died in 1881, fifty-eight years old; and Mrs. Sarah W. Merriman, who died at the age of fifty-five years. The others are: Mrs. Maria T....

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Biography of Dr. Rufus Merrill Weeks

Dr. Rufus Merrill Weeks, who resides in the village of Suncook, and is a well-known dentist in the town of Pembroke, was born in Gilford, N.H., December 15, 1854, son of William and Lizzie (Hutchinson) Weeks. Benjamin Weeks, the grandfather of Dr. Weeks, in his younger days was a farmer. He later learned Gilford. He became prominent in business circles and in public affairs, holding various town offices; and he was connected with the old State militia. In politics he was a Whig. He married, and reared a family of seven children. Of the latter the only survivor is Mrs. Harriet Gilman, who resides in Gilford. Benjamin Weeks and his wife lived to a good old age. He left with a good estate the reputation of an able and successful business man. William Weeks, a native of Gilford and the third-born of his parents’ children, was brought up on a farm. At an early age he displayed a natural aptitude for agricultural pursuits. The active period of his life was spent in tilling the soil of a good farm in Gilford, and he attained prominence as a practical and successful farmer. In politics he acted with the Republican party in his later years. He served as a Selectman for some time, and represented his district in the legislature. His wife, Lizzie, became the mother of eight children, of whom...

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Biography of Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Cooke Partridge

Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Cooke Partridge, a well-known musician of Claremont and a zealous worker in the cause of temperance, was born in Claremont, daughter of Godfrey and Abigail (Hubbard) Cooke. Her paternal grandfather, Captain John Cooke, of Norton, Mass., was among the first of the minute-men to report at Lexington in response to the alarm of April 19, 1775, for six days’ service. He again enlisted with the rank of Ensign, and was mustered out August 1, 1775. For the third time he enlisted December 8, 1776, in a Rhode Island regiment, under Colonel John Daggett. About the year 1779 he came to Claremont, and bought a large and valuable tract of meadow land and the tavern thereon. This tavern he conducted for years with much success. A family tradition has it that “a bushel of Continental money changed hands when the old tavern was bought.” His daughter, Matilda, married Colonel Josiah Stevens, who was the father of Paran Stevens, a famous hotel man. Paran Stevens received his first lessons in the hotel Godfrey Cooke. The Stevens High School was his gift to the village of Claremont. His daughter married Arthur Henry Fitzroy Paget, a son of General Paget of Waterloo fame. His sister married Samuel Fiske, the donor of the Fiske Free Library in Claremont. Godfrey Cooke and his brother George succeeded their father in the proprietorship of...

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Biography of J. Albert Peaslee

J. Albert Peaslee, an important factor of the agricultural and business community of Bradford, Merrimack County, was born in this town, on the farm that he still owns, December 14, 1845. His father, John Peaslee, a son of Samuel Peaslee, was a lifelong resident of Bradford. He was the Representative of an early settled family in New Hampshire, and one whose descendants are numerous in Hillsborough County, where, in the town of Pelham, they have an annual gathering. John Peaslee settled on the homestead farm now owned by his son, J. Albert, soon after attaining his majority, purchasing at first but ten acres. As time went on he bought other land, made valuable improvements; and at his death, which occurred in March, 1884, at the venerable age of fourscore and four years, he had one of the most valuable and attractive estates in the vicinity. He was twice married. His first wife was Chloe Maxfield, daughter of Richard Maxfield, who once owned the village of Bradford, then called Fishersfield. She died leaving two sons-Oliver, now of Bradford; and William, of Amherst, N.H. -and four daughters, namely: Margaret, wife of Stillman Parkhurst, of Bedford, N.H.; Minda, wife of B. B. Whiting, of Amherst; Hannah, wife of Timothy Morse, of Newbury, this county; and Sally, who died unmarried. He subsequently married Mrs. Betsey Presby Marshall, daughter of James Presby and granddaughter...

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Biographical Sketch of Rev. Bradford Leavitt

Rev. Leavitt is a minister of the Gospel; he is indeed more than this, for he is the pioneer in a new vocation in which his qualifications as a minister fit him for the perfect administration of his self imposed combined duties of clergyman and funeral director. When Rev. Leavitt entered this new field comparatively recently, opinion was divided as to the wisdom of his decision. Today the many hundreds whom he has served in this double and truly Christian role will testify that he was most certainly right in his decision; as he has proved that he could with his dual qualifications lessen the burden of grief attendant upon the last rites of those who pass away. Rev. Leavitt was born in 1868 in Boston, Mass. He came to California when a comparatively young man and has been a resident of Woodside for the last ten years. In 1893 he was married in Cambridge, Mass. The Rev. Leavitt was pastor of the First Unitarian (Star King) Church in San Francisco from 1900 to 1914 where his sermons and the administration of the affairs of the church attracted widespread comment of the most favorable nature. At the present day the Rev. Leavitt occupies the position as vice president of the N. Gray and Company of San Francisco and is the manager of the Burlingame and South San Francisco branches...

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Biography of John Shackford Kimball

John Shackford Kimball was an enterprising lawyer of Boston and a business man of Burlington, Ia. A son of David and Abigail (Perkins) Kimball, Pembroke, N.H., April 28, 1812. His descent from Michael Kimball, who married Bettie Runnells, came through David Kimball of the second generation and David Kimball of the third, who married Abigail Perkins. The fifth generation is now represented by John Stevens Kimball. Mr. Kimball’s parents died at Pembroke when he was thirteen years old, leaving nine children-Betsey, Asa, Perkins, John Shackford, Abigail, Sarah Towle (widow of Timothy Colby, of Concord ), Joseph, Mary Lewis (widow of Samuel B. Wright, of Burlington, Ia. ), and Harriet. Of these Sarah and Mary are living. Mary, who was about five years old at the death of her parents, subsequently lived in the family made famous at that time by the noted Prescott murder. Perkins, after spending some time in the printing business, was later employed in the Boston custom-house, and then kept a store in partnership with J. Frank Hoyt in Concord. On retiring from business, he returned to Hopkinton, and died there December 15, 1876. He first married Lydia Reed Wilde, of Boston, a sister of Joseph Wilde, of the well-known firm of Lawrence, Wilde & Co., furniture dealers, Cornhill, Boston. His second marriage was made with Savalla Mason, of Grafton, N.H., who survived him with one...

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Biographical Sketch of Judge George H. Buck

Few names stand out more prominently in the history of California jurisprudence than that of George H. Buck, Superior Judge of San Mateo County, who is completing his twenty-fifth year on the bench and his thirty-third year in public office. As a jurist Judge Buck is one of the most eminent in the State. In addition to sitting on the San Mateo County bench, Judge Buck has been called many times to preside for other judges, and three years ago Governor Johnson appointed him to fill Judge Dooling’s unexpired term when he left the San Benito county court to become a Federal judge. Judge Buck entered public life in 1882, when he was elected District Attorney of San Mateo County. He was re-elected each term until 1890 when the citizens of San Mateo County elevated him to the Superior Bench. The best evidence of Judge Buck’s popularity and ability is the handsome majorities by which the voters have returned him to office at each election for Superior Judge since then. It was only last year that he was reelected at the primaries for a six-year term by a sweeping vote. Judge Buck was born in Maine in 1847. After completing his education, he had charge of Gorham’s Seminary and Academy in Maine. He later studied law in the office of Woodbury & Ingalls at Boston. He was admitted to...

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Biographical Sketch of Maurice F. Boland

Maurice F. Boland, proprietor of Boland’s Cigar Store and Billiard Room in San Mateo, and for eleven years Chief of Police of San Mateo is well known throughout the county. As police chief, Boland had an enviable record. In addition to preserving order in the community, Chief Boland figured in the capture of many famous criminals. So satisfied were the citizens of San Mateo with his work, that he was re-elected several times and was in office at the time his business interests forced him to retire from public life. Of powerful physique Boland was a splendid athlete when a young man. He won prizes in all branches of sport. He is still a close follower of athletic events and keen authority on sports. Boland is a San Mateo property owner and in him the city finds a booster who always puts in a few good words for the city to every stranger that patronizes his place. Maurice F. Boland was born in Boston, Mass., where he lived for only three years. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Boland came from Ireland. Since coming west Mr. Boland spent a great part of his life in California and has been a resident of San Mateo for many years. He has been in the cigar business for the last four years. On December last he was married and lives with his...

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Biography of Hon. Isaac Darwin Merrill

Hon. Isaac Darwin Merrill, a well-known public man of Contoocook, is a son of Isaac and Mary (Wyman) Merrill, born October 1, 1814, in Hopkinton village, N.H. The father, a native of Hollis, Hillsborough County, born June 15, 1784, was a cooper by trade, and worked in Boston, Portland, and Troy, N.Y. When Isaac D. was about a year old, the family moved from Hopkinton to Hillsborough Bridge, where his father was employed at his trade. Later, more than sixty years ago, he settled in Contoocook, built the house where the subject of this sketch now resides, worked at his trade for some time longer, and died there, September 8, 1883, aged ninety-nine years, two months, and twenty-four days. He is well remembered in the community, among whom he is still spoken of as “Boss Merrill .” He was a man of strong frame and good health, industrious and apt to outdo his coworkers. Shortly before his death he became blind; and his last years were spent quietly at the homestead with his son, Isaac Darwin Merrill. He had three wives, whom he outlived. His first marriage was made with Mary Wyman, of Deering, who died May 31, 1843. She had eight children, six of whom, three sons and three daughters, reached maturity. The eldest, Clarinda, married Joseph L. Upton, of Contoocook, where she died after passing her eightieth...

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Biography of William Henry Harrison Moody

William Henry Harrison Moody, of Claremont, a retired shoe manufacturer and one of the wealthiest and most prominent men of New Hampshire, was born here, May 10, 1842, son of Jonathan Moody. His father made shoes by hand, employing several men in his business. Jonathan Moody took a lively interest in military matters throughout his life. A tenor drummer of reputation, he was always in demand at military training and at muster. The subject of this sketch, the seventh child in a family of eleven, was named for President William Henry Harrison. When fourteen years old, he entered the shoe factory of Russell W. Farwell, of Claremont, to learn the business; and he continued with that firm four years. In 1861 he enlisted in Troop L, New England Cavalry, served for a few months in the Civil War, and was then honorably discharged. In the fall of 1862 he engaged as travelling salesman for a large shoe jobbing firm in Boston, and was very successful in selling goods all over the country. His employers took him into partnership in 1867, when the firm name became McGibbons, Moody & Raddin. His capital was little more than ability and knowledge of the business. In 1873 he became a partner in the firm of Crain, Moody & Rising, who established a shoe manufactory at Amoskeag, N.H., employing one hundred hands, and making...

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Biography of Jesse W. S. Moon

Jesse W. S. Moon, a retired farmer, living in the village of Bradford, was born in Hopkinton, St. Lawrence County, N.Y., August 12, 1845. His parents, Jesse and Sophia (Barker) Moon, are well known in Bradford through their frequent visits to their son. Mr. Moon was reared on a farm, living with his parents until December 30, 1863, when he enlisted for service in the Civil War in the Eleventh New York Cavalry as a recruit, joining his regiment in Washington soon after. He served in the South, mostly in New Orleans. In the spring of 1864 he did guard on various plantations lying along the Mississippi, being for some months at Baton Rouge. He was honorably discharged May 16, 1865, at Memphis, Tenn. Returning to New York State, Mr. Moon was employed on the old homestead for a few years. In December, 1869, he went to Boston to work. While there he bought his present farm in Bradford, of which he took possession in July, 1874. His estate comprises two hundred and fifty acres of tillage and timber land and five hundred acres of pasture. He has carried on mixed farming, paying much attention to dairying, having a fine herd of thirty full-blooded Ayrshire cattle, which he considers the best milk producers. By remodelling and repairing the dwelling, and erecting new and commodious barns and out-buildings, he has...

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Biography of Benjamin Lyman Culver

Benjamin Lyman Culver, late a retired resident of Pembroke, Merrimack County, N.H., who died December 6, 1896, was born in Norwich, Vt., August 10, 1830, son of the Rev. Lyman and Fanny (Hovey) Culver. The Culver family is of French origin, and is said to have been founded in America by Benjamin L. Culver’s great-grandfather, John Culver, who, it is thought, emigrated from Paris, France. He settled in Connecticut, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits for the rest of his life. His son, James Culver, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was born in Connecticut; and in early life he settled in Vermont. He served in the French and Indian War. The active period of his life was spent in tilling the soil. He married; and he and his wife, who both lived to a good old age, reared a family of eight children. The parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal church and noted for their religious zeal. Two of their sons became ministers, and the Rev. David Culver preached in Pembroke in 1824. Lyman Culver, Benjamin L. Culver’s father, was born in Willington, Conn.; and at the age of seven years he accompanied his parents to Norwich, Vt. His boyhood and youth were passed upon a farm, and his leisure hours were devoted to study. He was practically a self-educated man; and at the age of...

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Biographical Sketch of Hiram C. Ellenwood

Hiram C. Ellenwood, a carpenter and undertaker of Charlestown, N.H., was born in Woodward, Vt., November 26, 1826, son of Cyrus and Sally (Draper) Ellenwood. His grandfather, Joseph Ellenwood, was a native of Greenfield, N.H., where he also resided during the greater part of his life, engaged in general farming. He married Mary Punchard, who became the mother of nine children. Their son, Cyrus, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Greenfield, N.H., in 1782. He was a shoemaker by trade, and removed to Charlestown at the age of fifty years. In 1811 he married Sally Draper, and they had seven children-Sally, Harvey, Simeon, Frances, Hiram (the subject of this sketch), Warren F., and Sarah. Hiram C. Ellenwood spent his school days in Acworth, N.H., where he stayed until he was twelve years of age. He then went to Charlestown, and worked on different farms outside the village. When he was twenty years old, he began to learn the carpenter’s trade, serving as an apprentice for three years. He afterward went to Boston, where he worked at his trade for two years. On his return he continued as a carpenter; but, becoming sexton for the Unitarian church, he entered also into the business of undertaking, which he has continued for thirty-five years. He is one of the prominent Democrats of Charlestown, and has served on public...

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