Location: Stone County MO

Biography of Albert Hodges

ALBERT HODGES. Albert Hodges is an attorney at law of wide reputation, a man of unquestioned integrity, a close reasoner and a profound thinker. He is a Missourian by birth, and has inculcated in him the sterling principles of the better class of citizens of the State. He was born in Taney County (afterward Douglas County), November 2, 1848, and is a son of Edmond and Sarah (Garrison) Hodges, the former a native of Kentucky, and the latter of Warren County, Indiana, born in 1827. The grandfather, John Hodges, was a native of Kentucky, and the family moved from that State to Indiana at an early date, and thence to Missouri in 1835- After reaching the latter State, the grandfather settled at the mouth of Beaver Spring Creek, in Taney County, afterward Douglas and Taney Counties, and followed farming the rest of his life. He was one of the earliest pioneers of that section. His son, the father of our subject, followed in his footsteps and became an agriculturist. He is still living on the tract of land where he settled many years ago, in Douglas County. In 1846 he married Miss Sarah Garrison and immediately afterward began his career as an agriculturist. He has met with unusual success and has a fine farm of 360 acres, the same being an ornament to the county. During the Civil War...

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Biography of Dr. Wesley B. Wasson

DR. WESLEY B. WASSON. The value to any community of a professional man is not marked merely by his learning and skill, his proficiency in medical and surgical practice, but also by his character both private and professional, his honorable adherence to medical ethics and his personal integrity and benevolence of purpose. When a physician combines these characteristics it is with great pleasure that we record his life-work, and such a man do we find in Dr. Wesley B. Wasson. Although but just starting on his career in the medical profession, this young physician and surgeon has already become prominent in his calling and has the confidence of all. He was born on Spring Creek, in Stone County, in 1862, and is a son of John T. and Caroline (McCullah) Wasson, the former born in Darke County, Ohio, February 29, 1820, and the latter in Tennessee, March 10, 1830. Although the father received but a limited education in his youth he was a man possessed of a great amount of good common sense and good judgment. About 1852 he came down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to the mouth of Arkansas River, then up that stream to Ft. Smith, and then by land across the country to Stone County. There he stopped for a time with Alex. McCullah, and soon after married his daughter. From that time until 1867...

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Biography of William E. McDowell

WILLIAM E. McDOWELL. Given the ordinary average of intelligence and good judgment’ and a fair education, any man may make a success in the avenues of trade. In the profession of law he must be endowed with superior intelligence and have gone through years of careful study and training to be able to cope with the brilliant minds which do honor to the bench and bar. William E. McDowell, attorney at law, of Galena, Missouri, is a gentleman of well-known ability and one who is an ornament to the profession. He is a native of Stone County, born one mile above the mouth of Flat Creek, at the old town site of Cape Fair, January 31, 1840. That town was undermined and fell in, and was completely destroyed during a big flood, about the year 1855. He is a son of Wiley and Margaret (Williams) McDowell. The former was born in Simpson County, Kentucky, in 1814, moved to Stone County, Missouri, in 1838, and settled on a farm one mile below the mouth of Flat Creek, near where the town of Cape Fair is now situated. There he lived until 1854, when he moved to another farm three miles southwest of Galena, on which he made his home until his death in January, 1875, at the age of sixty-one years. His father, John McDowell, of English descent, was for...

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Biography of John S. May

JOHN S. MAY. The energy and perseverance of a man’s character have nowhere a better field for manifestation than in agricultural pursuits and stock-raising, and from small beginnings often become wealthy and influential citizens. The original of this notice is a native of Missouri, born in Taney County in 1843, and is a son of John D. and Elizabeth (Sittsworth) May, natives respectively of Tennessee and Arkansas. When a boy John D. May went to Arkansas, where he married and soon after removed to Taney County, Missouri, locating in the woods on Bear Creek, where he improved a good farm. In December, 1861, he joined Company 1, Twenty-sixth Missouri Infantry, enlisting at Jefferson City, and died at St. Louis in the winter of 1861-62. He held the office of constable at one time and was a thoroughgoing, wide-awake farmer all his life. In political matters he affiliated with the Democratic party. Honorable and upright in every walk of life, he was highly esteemed in the community where he made his home. His father, John May, was a Tennessean by birth and bringing up, but at an early day came to Taney County, being among the first settlers of that county. The Indians were there in great numbers and Mr. May became a great hunter, killing many bears, wolves, deer, etc. He was also quite a bee hunter and gathered...

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Biography of Simeon P. Maples

SIMEON P. MAPLES. In no part of Missouri is agriculture in a more flourishing condition than in Christian County, and here Mr. Maples is considered one of the leading tillers of the soil. Like two-thirds of the representative citizens of the county he is a native of Tennessee, his birth occurring in Bradley County October 2, 1842, but he is now a law-abiding and public-spirited man of his adopted county. He is a son of Simeon P. and Elizabeth (Webb) Maples, the grandson of Josiah Maples and the great-grandson of Josiah Maples, Sr., who was born in France. At an early date the latter crossed the strait to England with two brothers, and subsequently came to the United States. This was prior to the Revolution, and he served under Gen. Washington during that war. He married and reared a family in Virginia, but later removed to Tennessee, where he tilled the soil in McMinn County until his death. Josiah Maples, Jr., was born in the Old Dominion, and when but a boy he moved with his parents to McMinn County, Tennessee, where he married. In 1854 he came to Christian County, Missouri, and followed farming until his death the following year. He was the father of nine children. Our subject’s maternal grandfather, Thomas Webb, was a blacksmith by trade, but in connection also carried on farming. He married Miss...

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Biography of John Short

JOHN SHORT. John Short, who is a native of east Tennessee, born in Roane County in 1826, but who has long been a resident of Stone County, is a son of Willis and Nancy (Kindrick) Short, who were also natives of east Tennessee, where they owned the farm upon which our subject was reared. The parents were hard-working, industrious people, and by their thrift and enterprise accumulated a fair competence. They passed their entire lives in their native State, the mother dying in 1873. Aaron Short, grandfather of our subject, was a native of Kentucky, but early moved to Tennessee, where he was an early settler. He was a Revolutionary soldier. Grandfather Kindrick was a farmer of Roane County, Tennessee, and there he and his wife passed their last days. To the parents of our subject were born fourteen children as follows: Franklin, an old settler and farmer of Stone County; Elias B., of Greene County; Melsena, the wife of Wesley McCullah, died in Stone County; Samuel, of Christian County; John, our subject; Jasper, died in Tennessee; William, was in the Federal Army and died in Virginia; Edom, of Tennessee; Julius, died in Clinton, Missouri, since the war; Jackson died in Tennessee; Lauriett of Tennessee; Diannah, died in Arkansas, and two others of whom no record is extant. In the district school our subject received a limited education and...

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Biography of Price Summers

PRICE SUMMERS. In the history of the Rebellion the name of our subject will be found as not having borne an unimportant part in that eventful struggle. He was about twenty-two years of age when he enlisted in Company E, First Arkansas Volunteer Cavalry, and he served over three years in the United States Army. Many of his battles were in Missouri and Arkansas, and he was in the bloody fight at Fayetteville, in the latter State. He was in many fights under Maj. Charles Galloway and Col. E. R. Harrison, but was never wounded or taken prisoner. On August 23, 1865, he was discharged at Fayetteville, Arkansas, and returned to Stone County, where he has followed agricultural pursuits up to the present. Mr. Summers was born in Franklin County, Tennessee, February 24, 1839, and is a son of Samuel P. and Charity (Wells) Summers, natives of Tennessee. The former was born in Warren County and moved to Alabama with his father, also Samuel Summers, where he remained until 1855. He then came to Stone County, Missouri, and settled on James River, just below Cape Fair, where he tilled the soil until after the war. Thence he moved to Carroll County, Arkansas, and there died in 1884. He gave most of his attention to agricultural pursuits during life and was a well-to-do citizen. He was also a carpenter and...

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Biography of Dr. Lafayette Henson

DR. LAFAYETTE HENSON. Dr. Henson is still in the dawn of the success which has attended his efforts in a professional way, but has already given abundant evidence of the ability which qualifies him for a high place in the medical profession. He is a true son of Missouri and of Stone County, his birth occurring in the western part of this county October 6, 1858. The progenitor of this family in America was Peter Henson, who settled in Tennessee at an early date, and where his ancestors resided for a number of generations. Thomas Henson, the grandfather of our subject, was born in that State and was there married. Later he moved to Illinois and made his home there until 1835, when he moved to the wilds of Stone County, Missouri He followed farming to some extent, but was a minister of the Hard Shell Baptist Church for many years, and was well known all over southwest Missouri. He and wife reared a large family and some members are still living in Barry County, Mo, and are quite aged people. The grandparents settled on Flat Creek, within a mile of the Barry County line, and took up Government land. Zachariah Henson, the father of our subject, was born in Tennessee in 1814, and was but a child when his parents moved to Illinois. When he was twenty-one years...

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Biography of J. G. Short

J. G. SHORT. The gentleman whose name heads this sketch is a good example of the public servant, for he is faithful to every duty, is accurate, painstaking and honorable and is also genial and accommodating. He is a native of the county in which he now lives, for here he first saw the light of day February 25, 1864, and, as a natural sequence, he has ever been interested in every enterprise tending to benefit the county of his nativity, and has done all in his power to make it the magnificent commonwealth that it now is. His father, John Short, was born in Tennessee, in 1824, and was one of the early pioneer families of that State. He came to Stone County, Missouri, over forty-two years ago and located in the vicinity where he now lives, the journey thither from Roane County, Tennessee, being made by wagon. He was married in Roane, his native county, to Miss Elizabeth Coleman, a member of an old Tennessee family, who was born and reared in Roane County, Tennessee Shortly after their marriage Mr. Short and his wife came West, and since that time he has been one of the highly respected citizens of Stone County. On July 4, 1876, his wife died, at the age of forty-three years, having become the mother of an old fashioned family of thirteen children,...

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Biography of Hon. Patrick C. Berry

HON. PATRICK C. BERRY. The position occupied by Patrick C. Berry as one of the prominent and influential citizens of Stone County, Missouri, has been gained by personal worth and unquestioned integrity. He is well and favorably known all over the county, few men more so, and is now enjoying the fruits of a well-spent life. In the grand old mother of States, Virginia, he was born, August 22, 1830, the seventh son and next to the youngest of the eight children of Samuel and Sarah (Hickey) Berry, both natives of Washington County, Virginia. Our subject’s grandfather, William Berry, was born in the Emerald Isle, but at an early date came to this country and settled in Virginia or Pennsylvania, dying in the former State. He was a farmer, and the old homestead in the Old Dominion is now owned by members of the family. Samuel Berry was born on this old farm in 1799, grew to manhood and married Miss Hickey. All his children were born in that State, and he remained there until 1843, when he started for Missouri, arriving here the following year. He located in Wright County and died there the same year. The family bought an improved farm, on which they resided many years and on which the mother died in 1856, when about sixty years of age. Her parents, William and Rachel (Martin)...

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Biography of Washington M. Wade

WASHINGTON M. WADE. Washington M. Wade, ex-clerk and recorder of Christian County, and a prominent banker of the county, was born in Carroll County, Arkansas, January 21, 1858, and was the youngest of ten children born to the union of Joseph and Nancy (Sivley) Wade. The father was born in Warren County, Kentucky, near Bowling Green, March 4, 1814, and the mother was born in Lawrence County, Ala., in 1816. The latter was the daughter of Mr. and Rachel Sivley, and was the only one of the family to come to Missouri. Our subject’s paternal grandparents were Joseph Wade and his wife, formerly Miss Mounts. The father of our subject came from Alabama to Greene County, Missouri, in 1840, but subsequently moved to Arkansas, where he made his home until 1861. He then moved to Rolla, Missouri, for being a strong Union man his ideas did not accord with his neighbors’, and he thought it prudent to leave. He enlisted in the army, but was rejected on account of his age. His wife took the family and located in the northeast part of Christian County, but after residing there one year, moved to Grand Prairie, in Greene County, north of Republic. In 1866 the family moved to the southwest point of Christian County, Galloway Township, near Highlandville, and there resided until the death of the father, on the 29th...

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Biography of Hon. James D. Gideon

HON. JAMES D. GIDEON. No better citizens have come to Christian County, Missouri, than those who crossed the Mississippi River from Tennessee, and who brought as their inheritance the traits of character and life which has ever distinguished them. Hon. James D. Gideon, who is one of the foremost farmers and stockraisers of Union Township, Stone County, first saw the light in Hawkins County, Tennessee, in 1833. His parents, John and Polly (Evans) Gideon, were also natives of that State, the father born in Hawkins and the mother in Jefferson County. Both were fairly well educated for those days, and made their home in Tennessee until 1843, when they removed to Lincoln County, Kentucky Six years later, or in 1849, Mr. Gideon came on foot to what is now Christian County, and being a clock tinker he made the trip to work at his trade. He remained in this State until 1853, having in the meantime taken up a claim in what is now the southeastern part of Christian County (then Taney County), and then returned to Kentucky to get his family. He then settled on his claim, improved a good farm, but during the war he sold this and moved to Greene County. After the war, in 1866, he returned to this county and located on Bear Creek, where his death occurred in 1870, when sixty-six years of...

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Biography of Hon. Alfred Peters

HON. ALFRED PETERS. A traveler journeying through Pierce Township about a mile and a quarter southwest of Crane postoffice, will see the attractive home and beautifully cultivated farm of our subject, which evidently shows the hand of a practiced and systematic farmer. Mr. Peters was born in western Virginia in 1826, and is a son of Jacob and Keziah (Gardner) Peters, also natives of the grand old Mother of States. Mrs. Peters died there in 1828, and after the father’s second marriage, he moved to Clay County, Ky, where he remained three years. Returning to Virginia, he passed the remainder of his days, dying when our subject was but a boy. He was a farmer, and although uneducated, was an honest, industrious citizen and a man with a host of warm friends. The grandfather, John Peters, was a Pennsylvania Duchman, but an early settler of western Virginia, where he lived for some time in a fort, and where he spent his days engaged in farming, until his death about 1847. Grandfather Gardner died in Virginia. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs, Peters, as follows: Nancy died in Baton Rouge, La.; William is a farmer in Virginia; Alfred our subject; and Matilda, who died in Arkansas. By his second marriage, Jacob Peters became the father of four children: Mathias and Isaac, twins, and Susan and Jacob both of...

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Biography of Hon. John H. Anderson

HON. JOHN H. ANDERSON. This part of Missouri has proved a mine of wealth to thousands of industrious and earnest farmers who have come hither from the East and by dint of hard work and enterprise have developed the resources which nature so liberally provided. Among these is John H. Anderson, who was born in North Carolina, in 1826, to the marriage of William and Jane (Scruggs) Anderson, natives of the Palmetto State, where they were reared and married. Later the parents moved to the Old North State and from there to Georgia, where they remained a few years. When our subject was five or six years of age the parents came by team to what is now Moniteau County, Missouri, when that was thinly settled, and in 1846 removed from there to Taney, now Stone County, and settled on Crane Creek. There they remained until the war, and in 1862 he removed with three of his sons to Texas. His death occurred at Ft. Griffin, Shackleford County, Tex., about 1883, when seventy-seven years of age. He followed farming through life and met with fair success. His father, Noble Anderson, was born in South Carolina, and his grandfather was a Revolutionary soldier. The mother of our subject died in the Lone Star State about 1886. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson were the parents of nine children: John H., subject; Polly,...

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Biography of J. Frank Seaman

J. FRANK SEAMAN. Among the reputable men of Galena who have made their home in Stone County since 1865, is J. Frank Seaman, whose birth occurred at Carrollton, Carroll County, Arkansas, October 1, 1847. His father, Hon. John F. Seaman, was born in Saratoga County, New York, in 1812, and was of Scotch origin. He remained in his native county until grown, and then became a driver on the Erie Canal. Following this, he became a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in 1834 emigrated to Michigan, where he resided two years. In 1836 he was appointed a missionary to the Cherokee Indians, and was in their nation for two years, after which he was transferred to the Arkansas conference. After a little he gave up his ministerial duties and began the study of medicine under Dr. Forest, of Huntsville, Madison County, Arkansas. Up to 1844 or 1845 he practiced medicine, and then engaged in merchandising at Carrollton. While there, he married Miss Sophia E. Kenner, August 18, 1846, and there remained until 1862, when, on account of his Union sentiments, it became unpleasant for him and he moved to Lawrence County, Missouri. There he resumed the practice of medicine and also tilled the soil until 1869, when he again embarked in merchandising, following this at Marionville, Missouri, until his death, which occurred suddenly, on March 27, 1870....

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