Location: Stewart County GA

Rood Creek Mounds

Rood Creek Mounds (also known as Roods Creek Mounds) is a very large Native American town site in southwestern Georgia that is immediately east of the Chattahoochee River in Stewart County. It was one of the largest Native American towns in the eastern United States. The original palisade enclosed about 120 acres and eight mounds. The final palisade enclosed at least eight mounds and 150 acres.   The archaeological zone is now within Rood Landing Recreation Area, a US Army Corps of Engineers facility on Lake Eufaula. Relatively little is known about this archaeological zone. Four mounds (A, B, D...

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Slave Narrative of Angeline Lester

Interviewer: Frank M. Smith Person Interviewed: Angeline Lester Location: Youngstown, Ohio Place of Residence: 835 West Federal Street Story and Photo by Frank M. Smith Ex-Slaves Mahoning County, Dist. #5 Youngstown, Ohio The Story of MRS. ANGELINE LESTER, of Youngstown, Ohio. Mrs. Angeline Lester lives at 836 West Federal Street, on U.S. Route #422, in a very dilapidated one story structure, which once was a retail store room with an addition built on the rear at a different floor level. Angeline lives alone and keeps her several cats and chickens in the house with her. She was born on the plantation of Mr. Womble, near Lumpkin, Stewart County, Georgia about 1847, the exact date not known to her, where she lived until she was about four years old. Then her father was sold to a Dr. Sales, near Brooksville, Georgia, and her mother and a sister two years younger were sold to John Grimrs[HW:?], who in turn gave them to his newly married daughter, the bride of Henry Fagen, and was taken to their plantation, near Benevolence, Randolph County, Georgia. When the Civil War broke out, Angeline, her mother and sister were turned over to Robert Smith, who substituted for Henry Fagen, in the Confederate Army. Angeline remembers the soldiers coming to the plantation, but any news about the war was kept from them. After the war a celebration...

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Native American History of Stewart County, Georgia

Stewart County is located in southwest Georgia, south of Columbus and Fort Benning. It was named after Brig. General Daniel Stewart, a commander in the Georgia Militia during the American Revolution and the War of 1812. Stewart was the great-grandfather of President Theodore Roosevelt. The county seat of Stewart County is the town of Lumpkin. Stewart County is bounded on the north by Chattahoochee County, GA. On the south, it is bordered by Randolph County, GA. The county’s western boundaries are formed by the Chattahoochee River, the Alabama State Line, Barbour County, AL and Russell County, AL. On the east, it is bordered by Webster County, GA. Geology and hydrology Stewart County is located in the Upper Gulf Coastal Plain. In most areas of the Gulf Coastal Plain the terrain is almost level with sandy loam soils. The soils located in stream former Miocene, Pliocene and Holocene swamplands (25 million to 2,000 years ago) can be extremely fertile. Because of their sandy structure, they were particular attractive to Native American farmers, who only had crude stone and bone tools with which to till the soil. The Chattahoochee Red Clay Hills run through Stewart County. Here, there are deep ravines and canyons created by streams flowing westward through soft sedimentary soils. Inappropriate farming methods by 19th century farmers worsened the erosion to the point that much of this landscape is...

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Sawokli Indians

Sawokli Tribe: Possibly meaning “raccoon people,” in the Hitchiti language, and, while this is not absolutely certain, the okli undoubtedly means “people.” Sawokli Connections. The Sawokli belonged to the Muskhogean linguistic stock and to the subdivision called Atcik-hata. (See Apalachicola.) Sawokli Location. The best known historic location was on Chattahoochee River in the northeastern part of the present Barbour County, Ala. (See Florida and Georgia.) Sawokli Villages Hatchee tcaba, probably on or near Hatchechubbee Creek, in Russell County, Ala. Okawaigi, on Cowikee Creek, in Barbour County, Ala. Okiti-yagani, in Clay County, Ga., not far from Fort Gaines. Sawokli, several different locations, the best known of which is given above. Sawoklutci, on the east bank of the Chattahoochee River, in Stewart County, Ga. Teawokli, probably on Chattahoochee River in the northeastern part of Russell County, Ala. Sawokli History. When first known to the Spaniards the Sawokli were living on Chattahoochee River below the falls of Columbus, Georgia, on the Alabama side. A Spanish mission, Santa Cruz de Sabacola, was established in one section of the tribe by Bishop Calderón of Cuba in 1675, and missionaries were sent to a larger body among the Creeks in 1679 and again in 1681. Most of the Indians surrounding these latter, however, soon became hostile and those who were Christianized withdrew to the junction of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers, where they were settled...

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Oconee Indians

Oconee Tribe – Significance unknown. Oconee Connections. The Oconee belonged to the Muskhogean linguistic stock, and the Atcik-hata group. (See Apalachicola) Oconee Location. Just below the Rock Landing on Oconee River, Georgia. (see also Florida.) Oconee History. Early documents reveal at least two bodies of Indians bearing the name Oconee and probably related. One was on or near the coast of Georgia and seems later to have moved into the Apalachee country and to have become fused with the Apalachee tribe before the end of the seventeenth century. The other was at the point above indicated, on Oconee River. About 1685 they were on Chattahoochee River, whence they moved to the Rock Landing. A more northerly location for at least part of the tribe may be indicated in the name of a Cherokee town, though that may have been derived from a Cherokee word as Mooney supposed. About 1716 they moved to the east bank of the Chattahoochee in Stewart County, Georgia, and a few years later part went to the Alachua Plains, in the present Alachua County, Florida, where they became the nucleus of the Seminole Nation and furnished the chief to that people until the end of the Seminole war. Most of them were then taken to Oklahoma, but they had already lost their identity. Oconee Population. The following estimates of effective Oconee men in the Creek...

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Kolomi Tribe

The earliest mention of Kolomi town is contained in a letter of the Spanish lieutenant at Apalachee, Antonio Mateos, in 1686. 1Serrano y Sanz, Doc. Hist., pp. 194-195. A translation of this has been given in considering the history of the Kasihta. 2See p. 221. The town was then probably on Ocmulgee River, where it appears on some of the very early maps, placed close to Atasi. From the failure of Mateos to mention Atasi it is possible that that town was not yet in existence. From later maps we learn that after the Yamasee war the Kolomi settled on the Chattahoochee. The maps show them in what is now Stewart County, Ga., but Colomokee Creek in Clay County may perhaps mark a former settlement of Kolomi people farther south. The name is often given on maps in the form ”Colomino.” 3This form of the name suggests a derivation from kulo, a kind of oak with large acorns, and omin, “where there are.” Still later they removed to the Tallapoosa, where, as appears from Bartram, they first settled upon the east bank but later moved across. 4Bartram, Travels, p. 394. In all these changes they seem to have kept company with the Atasi. Their name appears in the lists of 1738, 1750, 1760, and 1761. In 1761 their officially recognized trader was James Germany. 5MS8., Ayer Lib.; Miss. Prov. Arch.,...

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