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Location: Stanley County NC

Slave Narrative of Robert McKinley

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Robert McKinley Location: Indianapolis, Indiana Place of Birth: Stanley County, N.C. Date of Birth: 1849 Place of Residence: 1664 Columbia Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Occupation: “herb doctor” Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana FOLKLORE ROBERT MCKINLEY-EX-SLAVE 1664 Columbia Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Robert McKinley was born in Stanley County, N.C., in 1849, a slave of Arnold Parker. His master was a very cruel man, but was always kind to him, because he had given him (Bob) as a present to his favorite daughter, Jane Alice, and she would never permit anyone to mistreat Bob. Miss Jane Alice was very fond of little Bob, and taught him to read and write. His master owned a large farm, but Jane Alice would not let little Bob work on the farm. Instead, he helped his master in the blacksmith shop. His master always prepared himself to whip his slaves by drinking a large glass of whiskey to give him strength to beat his slaves. Robert remembers seeing his master beat his mother until she would fall to the ground, and he was helpless to protect her. He would just have to stand and watch. He has seen slaves tied to trees and beaten until the...

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Slave Narrative of Mrs. Phoebe Bost

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Frank Smith Person Interviewed: Phoebe Bost Location: Campbell, Ohio Place of Birth: Louisiana Place of Residence: 3461 Wilson Avenue, Campbell, Ohio Youngstown, Ohio. Mrs. Phoebe Bost, was born on a plantation in Louisiana, near New Orleans. She does not know her exact age but says she was told, when given her freedom that she was about 15 years of age. Phoebe’s first master was a man named Simons, who took her to a slave auction in Baltimore, where she was sold to Vaul Mooney (this name is spelled as pronounced, the correct spelling not known.) When Phoebe was given her freedom she assummed the name of Mooney, and went to Stanley County, North Carolina, where she worked for wages until she came north and married to Peter Bost. Phoebe claims both her masters were very mean and would administer a whipping at the slightest provocation. Phoebe’s duties were that of a nurse maid. “I had to hol’ the baby all de time she slept” she said “and sometimes I got so sleepy myself I had to prop ma’ eyes open with pieces of whisks from a broom.” She claims there was not any recreation, such as singing and dancing permitted at this plantation. Phoebe, who is now widowed, lives with her daughter, in part of...

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Biography of Hon. William Alexander Ramsey

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now HON. WILLIAM ALEXANDER RAMSEY. This able associate  the Shannon County Court, from the Western District, is a native of Stanley County, N. C., born in 1845, and a son of Sanders Taylor and Leah (Light) Ramsey, who were also born in the Old North State, where they lived until 1846, when they removed to Tennessee, and four years later to Alabama, and two years from that time to Iron County, Missouri, where Mr. Ramsey died in January, 1894, aged about seventy-five years, and his wife in 1866, both having been members of the Southern Methodist Church. Mr. Ramsey was a farmer, a mechanic, and was an exceptionally skillful wheelwright and chairmaker. He led a very active life, made a good living for his family, was honest and upright, and although an uneducated man, was naturally intelligent. His second wife was Martha Howell, who still survives him. The paternal grandfather, Nathaniel Ramsey, is supposed to have been a North Carolinian, but nothing is positively known of him. Christopher Light, the maternal grandfather, came to Iron County, Missouri, about 1852, and finally settled in Dent County, where he died about 1879, a farmer and blacksmith by occupation. His wife died in Iron County in 1879. William Alex. Ramsey was the fifth of eight children born to his parents:...

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Tom H. Russell

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Sergt., Camp Personnel Co.; of Stanley County; son of W. C. and S. F. A. Russell. Entered service May 24, 1918, at Winston-Salem. Sent to Camp Jackson, transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C. Mustered out at Camp Sevier Feb. 14,...

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David T. Singleton

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Private, Depot Co., Artly., 3rd Army Corps; son of R. D. and Caroline Singleton, of Norwood, Stanley County. Entered service March 19, 1918. Sent to Camp Jackson, then to Camp Merritt. Sailed for France May 22, 1918. Fought at Chateau-Thierry, Meuse-Argonne, Verdun, Champagne, Mons. Gassed at Argonne September, 1918. Returned to USA Aug. 2, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., Aug. 10,...

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Jesse W. Morris

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Private, 2nd Trench Mortar Btn., Btry. B, 77th Div.; of Stanley County; son of J. B. and Mrs. Caroline Morris. Entered service June 1, 1916, at Salisbury, N.C. Sent to Ft. Caswell, N.C. Transferred to Camp Mills, L. I., N. Y. Sailed for France May 28, 1918. In action 28 days on Lorraine Front. Returned to USA April 20, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., May 7,...

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Thomas A. Hathcock

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Major, Med. Corps, 31st Div.; of Stanley County; son of the late T. A. and Sarah Katherine Hathcock. Husband of Estelle (Dunlap) Hathcock. Entered service Aug. 2, 1917, at Norwood. Sent to Ft. Oglethorpe; transferred to Camp Wheeler; then Promoted to Capt. May 23, 1918. Major Jan., 1919. On duty at Base Hospital at Camp Wheeler. Transferred to Evacuation Hospital No. 52, Ft. Oglethorpe, remained with this group until Armistice was signed. Ranking officer until discharged. Mustered out at Ft. Oglethorpe, Dec. 5, 1918. His father, T. A. Hathcock, was Captain of Confederate Home Guard in the Civil...

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